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Chimes of freedom : the politics of Bob Dylan's art

Author: Mike Marqusee
Publisher: New York : New Press, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Though it was blues and folk songs that first led Bob Dylan to politics, it was politics that unlocked his astonishing songwriting ability, evidenced by dazzling responses in the early 1960s to the civil rights movement and the threat of nuclear war. Chimes of Freedom reasserts the timeliness of such political songs as A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall, revealing that although Dylan actually penned the song prior to the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Bob Dylan; Bob Dylan; Bob Dylan; Bob Dylan
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mike Marqusee
ISBN: 156584825X 9781565848252
OCLC Number: 51991566
Description: vii, 327 pages ; 20 cm
Contents: The whole wide world is watchin' --
Not much is really sacred --
Little boy lost --
The wicked messenger --
Corruptible seed.
Responsibility: Mike Marqusee.
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Abstract:

"Though it was blues and folk songs that first led Bob Dylan to politics, it was politics that unlocked his astonishing songwriting ability, evidenced by dazzling responses in the early 1960s to the civil rights movement and the threat of nuclear war. Chimes of Freedom reasserts the timeliness of such political songs as A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall, revealing that although Dylan actually penned the song prior to the event widely-thought to have inspired it - the Cuban Missile Crisis - he was able to do so precisely because he was fundamentally a political artist with an astute sense of the prevailing anxieties." "Marqusee then traces the young songwriter's subsequent reluctance to be pigeoholed, his rejection of "protest," and his turn to electric rock at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965. He shows the way folk tradition, modernism, and commercial popular culture are sublimely fused in Dylan's masterworks of the mid-1960s, notably on the albums Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde, and discusses the artist's quest for American identity - amid the continuing carnage in Vietnam and growing chaos at home - in The Basement Tapes and John Wesley Harding."--Jacket.

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