The Civil War diary of Sarah Morgan (Book, 1991) [WorldCat.org]
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The Civil War diary of Sarah Morgan

Author: Sarah Morgan Dawson; Charles East
Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, ©1991.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In January 1862, nine months after the start of the Civil War, Sarah Morgan of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, began a diary that would become one of the most remarkable records of the era. Now published for the first time in its entirety, it provides a moving account of a family caught up in the turmoil of war, as well as a fascinating look inside the mind o fan extraordinary 19th-century woman. Not yet twenty years old  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Autobiographies
Diaries
History
Personal narratives
Personal narratives, Confederate
Named Person: Sarah Morgan Dawson; Sarah Morgan Dawson; Sarah Morgan
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Sarah Morgan Dawson; Charles East
ISBN: 0820313572 9780820313573
OCLC Number: 23144535
Notes: Revised edition of: A Confederate girl's diary. 1960.
Description: xli, 626 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Responsibility: edited by Charles East.

Abstract:

In January 1862, nine months after the start of the Civil War, Sarah Morgan of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, began a diary that would become one of the most remarkable records of the era. Now published for the first time in its entirety, it provides a moving account of a family caught up in the turmoil of war, as well as a fascinating look inside the mind o fan extraordinary 19th-century woman. Not yet twenty years old when she began her diary, Sarah had already seen her three brothers join the Confederate forces. Soon she herself became a first-hand witness to the war's dangers and deprivations. Richly evocative of its period, the diary is especially striking for the clarity of its observations and the questioning nature of its author. Though Sarah remained a loyal Southerner, her sympathies could also extend to the Union wounded and to the women of the North. And while she belonged to her society's privileged class and shared its racial attitudes, she could also chafe at its tyrannical subordination of women. Long recognized as one of the most important personal records of the Civil War, this book is also the story of one woman's emotional development. "It is a life's lesson learned in the most terrible way- compressed into the span of a war instead of a lifetime."--Publisher description.

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