skip to content
Classical studies, patriarchy and feminism: The view from 1986
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Classical studies, patriarchy and feminism: The view from 1986

Author: Marilyn B Skinner Affiliation: Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115, U.S.A.
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Women's Studies International Forum, v10 n2 (1987): 181-186
Summary:
Approaching the study of Greco-Roman civilization from a feminist perspective presents special problems: classical studies is one of the most conservative, hierarchical and patriarchal of academic fields, and women classicists, even those professing themselves feminists, remain strongly male-oriented. The historic use of classical studies as a self-enhancing cultural emblem and a gatekeeping mechanism designed to  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy online

Links to this journal/publication

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Marilyn B Skinner Affiliation: Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115, U.S.A.
ISSN:0277-5395
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4930991625
Awards:

Abstract:

Approaching the study of Greco-Roman civilization from a feminist perspective presents special problems: classical studies is one of the most conservative, hierarchical and patriarchal of academic fields, and women classicists, even those professing themselves feminists, remain strongly male-oriented. The historic use of classical studies as a self-enhancing cultural emblem and a gatekeeping mechanism designed to control access to education and power explains its present appeal to reactionary elitists, along with its tendency to attract female practitioners with an intense ‘daughterly’ ego-investment in the prevailing system. Research on women in antiquity, though popular and well-regarded among male and female classicists, is therefore conservative by feminist standards and makes relatively little use of new cross-disciplinary scholarship on women. Critical neglect and/or trivialization of the work of the several women poets of ancient Greece provides a telling example of how knowledge that does not fit male disciplinary paradigms can be dismissed, even by women scholars doing women in antiquity research. Recent critiques of the field by both mainstream and feminist members nevertheless offer hope for gradual disciplinary change.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/4930991625> # Classical studies, patriarchy and feminism: The view from 1986
    a schema:Article, schema:CreativeWork ;
    library:oclcnum "4930991625" ;
    rdfs:comment "949 $l journal" ;
    schema:creator <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/211062633#Person/skinner_marilyn_b> ; # Marilyn B. Skinner
    schema:datePublished "1987" ;
    schema:description "Approaching the study of Greco-Roman civilization from a feminist perspective presents special problems: classical studies is one of the most conservative, hierarchical and patriarchal of academic fields, and women classicists, even those professing themselves feminists, remain strongly male-oriented. The historic use of classical studies as a self-enhancing cultural emblem and a gatekeeping mechanism designed to control access to education and power explains its present appeal to reactionary elitists, along with its tendency to attract female practitioners with an intense ‘daughterly’ ego-investment in the prevailing system. Research on women in antiquity, though popular and well-regarded among male and female classicists, is therefore conservative by feminist standards and makes relatively little use of new cross-disciplinary scholarship on women. Critical neglect and/or trivialization of the work of the several women poets of ancient Greece provides a telling example of how knowledge that does not fit male disciplinary paradigms can be dismissed, even by women scholars doing women in antiquity research. Recent critiques of the field by both mainstream and feminist members nevertheless offer hope for gradual disciplinary change." ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/211062633> ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://worldcat.org/issn/0277-5395#10_2> ;
    schema:name "Classical studies, patriarchy and feminism: The view from 1986" ;
    schema:pageStart "181" ;
    schema:productID "4930991625" ;
    schema:sameAs <http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0277-5395(87)90027-6> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/4930991625> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/211062633#Agent/elsevier_ltd> # Elsevier Ltd
    a bgn:Agent ;
    schema:name "Elsevier Ltd" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/211062633#Person/skinner_marilyn_b> # Marilyn B. Skinner
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:name "Marilyn B. Skinner" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/issn/0277-5395>
    a schema:Periodical ;
    rdfs:label "Women's Studies International Forum" ;
    schema:issn "0277-5395" ;
    schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/211062633#Agent/elsevier_ltd> ; # Elsevier Ltd
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.