Climate and the making of worlds : toward a geohistorical poetics (Book, 2021) [WorldCat.org]
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Climate and the making of worlds : toward a geohistorical poetics
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Climate and the making of worlds : toward a geohistorical poetics

Author: Tobias Menely
Publisher: Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, 2021. ©2021
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"For the humanities, climate change is a problem of historical understanding that requires new scales of context, including that of planetary processes. In this book, Tobias Menely shows that poetry is a rich and revealing archive of geohistorical change. Poetry and the kind of human world-making that it exemplifies can best be understood, Menely argues, through their interconnections with a dynamic Earth System.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: ebook version :
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Tobias Menely
ISBN: 9780226776149 022677614X 9780226776286 022677628X
OCLC Number: 1200581077
Description: vii, 269 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: Introduction : stratigraphic criticism --
"Earth trembled" : Paradise lost, the little Ice Age, and the climate of allegory --
"The works of nature" : descriptive poetry and the history of the earth in Thomson's The seasons --
Mine, factory, and plantation : the industrial georgic and the crisis of description --
Uncertain atmospheres : romantic lyricism in the time of the Anthropocene.
Other Titles: Toward a geohistorical poetics
Responsibility: Tobias Menely.

Abstract:

"For the humanities, climate change is a problem of historical understanding that requires new scales of context, including that of planetary processes. In this book, Tobias Menely shows that poetry is a rich and revealing archive of geohistorical change. Poetry and the kind of human world-making that it exemplifies can best be understood, Menely argues, through their interconnections with a dynamic Earth System. Menely focuses on English poetry of the momentous century and a half, during which Britain, emerging from a crisis intensified by the Little Ice Age, established the largest empire in world history and instigated the Industrial Revolution. These poems depict seasonal and climatic extremes, unpredictable weather, and the cycles of wind and water as inescapable conditions of production and limits to growth. Menely shows that geohistorical transition is expressed not only topically but also in changing literary modes, and that the poetry of this period--from Milton's "Paradise Lost" forward--reflects a recognition of planetary crisis. The result is a bracing and sophisticated contribution to ecological poetics and to the cultural history of the Anthropocene"--

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"Menely's book addresses an extraordinarily taxing interpretive problem. How has the turbulence of the Earth itself intervened in the history of poetic form? His answer is revelatory. With erudition, Read more...

 
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