Colonial women : race and culture in stuart drama. (eBook, 2001) [WorldCat.org]
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Colonial women : race and culture in stuart drama.

Author: Heidi Hutner
Publisher: New York : Oxford Univ Press, 2001.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Analyzing the plays of Shakespeare, Fletcher, Davenant, Dryden, Behn and other playwrights, Heidi Hutner argues that in drama, as in historical accounts, the symbol of the native woman is used to justify the English commodification and exploitation of the New World and its native inhabitants.
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Named Person: William Shakespeare; Aphra Behn; William Shakespeare; Aphra Behn; William Shakespeare
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Heidi Hutner
ISBN: 0195349644 9780195349641
OCLC Number: 191924393
Description: 1 online resource (pages)
Contents: Introduction: Colonial Women and Stuart Drama; One: The Tempest, The Sea Voyage, and the Pocahontas Myth; Two: Restoration Revisions of The Tempest; Three: The Indian Queen and The Indian Emperour; Four: Aphra Behn's The Widow Ranter; Afterword; Notes; Index.

Abstract:

Analyzing the plays of Shakespeare, Fletcher, Davenant, Dryden, Behn and other playwrights, Heidi Hutner argues that in drama, as in historical accounts, the symbol of the native woman is used to justify the English commodification and exploitation of the New World and its native inhabitants.

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