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The color of the law : race, violence, and justice in the post-World War II South Preview this item
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The color of the law : race, violence, and justice in the post-World War II South

Author: Gail Williams O'Brien
Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©1999.
Series: John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"On February 25, 1946, African Americans in Columbia, Tennessee, averted the lynching of James Stephenson, a nineteen-year-old, black Navy veteran who had fought with a white Army veteran and radio repairman at a local department store. That night, after Stephenson was safely out of town, four of Columbia's police officers were shot and wounded when they tried to enter the town's black business district. The next  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
O'Brien, Gail Williams.
Color of the law.
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©1999
(OCoLC)607208220
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Gail Williams O'Brien
ISBN: 0807824755 9780807824757 0807848026 9780807848029
OCLC Number: 39695512
Awards: American Historical Association Littleton-Griswold Prize in American Law and Society, 2000.
Description: xiii, 334 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: The Columbia story --
The bottom and its brokers --
War, esteem, efficacy, and entitlement --
The making and unmaking of mobocracy --
The politics of policing --
Grand (jury) maneuvers and the politics of exclusion --
Outsiders and the politics of justice.
Series Title: John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture.
Responsibility: Gail Williams O'Brien.
More information:

Abstract:

Drawing on oral interviews and an array of written sources, this is the dramatic story of the 1946 Columbia ""race riot"", the national attention it drew, and its surprising legal aftermath. It  Read more...

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