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Computer Security Handbook.

Author: Seymour Bosworth; M E Kabay; Eric Whyne
Publisher: New York : John Wiley & Sons, 2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 5th edView all editions and formats
Summary:
The classic and authoritative reference in the field of computer security, now completely updated and revised With the continued presence of large-scale computers; the proliferation of desktop, laptop, and handheld computers; and the vast international networks that interconnect them, the nature and extent of threats to computer security have grown enormously. Now in its fifth edition, Computer Security Handbook  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Bosworth, Seymour.
Computer Security Handbook.
New York : John Wiley & Sons, ©2012
Print version:
Bosworth, Seymour.
Computer Security Handbook, Set.
Somerset : Wiley, ©2012
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Seymour Bosworth; M E Kabay; Eric Whyne
ISBN: 9780470413746 0470413743
OCLC Number: 1058151417
Notes: 3.2: Six Essential Security Elements.
Description: 1 online resource (2034 pages)
Contents: Computer Security Handbook; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; About the Editors; About the Contributors; A Note to Instructors; Part I: Foundations of Computer Security; 1. Brief History and Mission of Information System Security; 1.1: Introduction to Information System Security; 1.2: Evolution of Information Systems; 1.2.1: 1950s: Punched-Card Systems; 1.2.2: Large-Scale Computers; 1.2.3: Medium-Size Computers; 1.2.4: 1960s: Small-Scale Computers; 1.2.5: Transistors and Core Memory; 1.2.6: Time Sharing; 1.2.7: Real-Time, Online Systems; 1.2.8: A Family of Computers. 1.2.9: 1970s: Microprocessors, Networks, and Worms1.2.10: First Personal Computers; 1.2.11: First Network; 1.2.12: Further Security Considerations; 1.2.13: First "Worm."; 1.2.14: 1980s: Productivity Enhancements; 1.2.15: Personal Computer; 1.2.16: Local Area Networks; 1.2.17: 1990s: Total Interconnection; 1.2.18: Telecommuting; 1.2.19: Internet and the World Wide Web; 1.3: Government Recognition of Information Assurance; 1.3.1: IA Standards; 1.3.2: Computers at Risk; 1.3.3: InfraGard; 1.4: Recent Developments; 1.5: Ongoing Mission for Information System Security; 1.6: Notes. 2. History of Computer Crime2.1: Why Study Historical Records?; 2.2: Overview; 2.3: 1960s and 1970s: Sabotage; 2.3.1: Direct Damage to Computer Centers; 2.3.2: 1970-1972: Albert the Saboteur; 2.4: Impersonation; 2.4.1: 1970: Jerry Neal Schneider; 2.4.2: 1980-2003: Kevin Mitnick; 2.4.3: Credit Card Fraud; 2.4.4: Identity Theft Rises; 2.5: Phone Phreaking; 2.5.1: 2600 Hz; 2.5.2: 1982-1991: Kevin Poulsen; 2.6: Data Diddling; 2.6.1: Equity Funding Fraud (1964-1973); 2.6.2: 1994: Vladimir Levin and the Citibank Heist; 2.7: Salami Fraud; 2.8: Logic Bombs; 2.9: Extortion; 2.10: Trojan Horses. 2.10.1: 1988 Flu-Shot Hoax2.10.2: Scrambler, 12-Tricks and PC Cyborg; 2.10.3: 1994: Datacomp Hardware Trojan; 2.10.4: Keylogger Trojans; 2.10.5: Haephrati Trojan; 2.10.6: Hardware Trojans and Information Warfare; 2.11: Notorious Worms and Viruses; 2.11.1: 1970-1990: Early Malware Outbreaks; 2.11.2: December 1987: Christmas TreeWorm; 2.11.3: November 2, 1988: Morris Worm; 2.11.4: Malware in the 1990s; 2.11.5: March 1999: Melissa; 2.11.6: May 2000: I Love You; 2.12: Spam; 2.12.1: 1994: Green Card Lottery Spam; 2.12.2: Spam Goes Global; 2.13: Denial of Service; 2.13.1: 1996: Unamailer. 2.13.2: 2000: MafiaBoy2.14: Hacker Underground of the 1980s and 1990s; 2.14.1: 1981: Chaos Computer Club; 2.14.2: 1982: The 414s; 2.14.3: 1984: Cult of the Dead Cow; 2.14.4: 1984: 2600: The Hacker Quarterly; 2.14.5: 1984: Legion of Doom; 2.14.6: 1985: Phrack; 2.14.7: 1989: Masters of Deception; 2.14.8: 1990: Operation Sundevil; 2.14.9: 1990: Steve Jackson Games; 2.14.10: 1992: L0pht Heavy Industries; 2.14.11: 2004: Shadowcrew; 2.15: Concluding Remarks; 2.16: Further Reading; 2.17: Notes; 3. Toward a New Framework for Information Security; 3.1: Proposal for A New Information Security Framework.

Abstract:

The classic and authoritative reference in the field of computer security, now completely updated and revised With the continued presence of large-scale computers; the proliferation of desktop, laptop, and handheld computers; and the vast international networks that interconnect them, the nature and extent of threats to computer security have grown enormously. Now in its fifth edition, Computer Security Handbook continues to provide authoritative guidance to identify and to eliminate these threats where possible, as well as to lessen any losses attributable to them. With seventy-seven chapter.

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