Concrete revolution : large dams, Cold War geopolitics, and the US Bureau of Reclamation (eBook, 2015) [WorldCat.org]
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Concrete revolution : large dams, Cold War geopolitics, and the US Bureau of Reclamation
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Concrete revolution : large dams, Cold War geopolitics, and the US Bureau of Reclamation

Author: Christopher Sneddon
Publisher: Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, [2015] ©2015
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Water may seem innocuous, but as a universal necessity, it inevitably intersects with politics when it comes to acquisition, control, and associated technologies. While we know a great deal about the socioecological costs and benefits of modern dams, we know far less about their political origins and ramifications. In Concrete Revolution, Christopher Sneddon offers a corrective: a compelling historical account of  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Erscheint auch als:
Druck-Ausgabe
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Christopher Sneddon
ISBN: 9780226284453 022628445X
OCLC Number: 915159107
Description: 1 online resource : illustrations
Contents: Large dams, technopolitics, and development --
Building a "world-wide fraternity": the Bureau, China, and John Savage --
"A reclamation program to lead them": the Bureau goes global --
Ethiopia, the Bureau, and investigations of the blue Nile --
Cold War geopolitics, technical expertise, and the Mekong project --
Large dams and the contemporary geopolitics of development --
Conclusion: large dams and other things.
Responsibility: Christopher Sneddon.
More information:

Abstract:

Water may seem innocuous, but as a universal necessity, it inevitably intersects with politics when it comes to acquisition, control, and associated technologies. While we know a great deal about the socioecological costs and benefits of modern dams, we know far less about their political origins and ramifications. In Concrete Revolution, Christopher Sneddon offers a corrective: a compelling historical account of the US Bureau of Reclamation's contributions to dam technology, Cold War politics, and the social and environmental adversity perpetuated by the US government in its pursuit of economic growth and geopolitical power. Founded in 1902, the Bureau became enmeshed in the US State Department's push for geopolitical power following World War II, a response to the Soviet Union's increasing global sway. By offering technical and water resource management advice to the world's underdeveloped regions, the Bureau found that it could not only provide them with economic assistance and the United States with investment opportunities, but also forge alliances and shore up a country's global standing in the face of burgeoning communist influence. Drawing on a number of international case studies-from the Bureau's early forays into overseas development and the launch of its Foreign Activities Office in 1950 to the Blue Nile investigation in Ethiopia-Concrete Revolution offers insights into this historic damming boom, with vital implications for the present. If, Sneddon argues, we can understand dams as both technical and political objects rather than instruments of impartial science, we can better participate in current debates about large dams and river basin planning.

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