Connecting histories : a comparative exploration of African-Caribbean and Jewish history and memory in modern Britain (Book, 2006) [WorldCat.org]
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Connecting histories : a comparative exploration of African-Caribbean and Jewish history and memory in modern Britain
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Connecting histories : a comparative exploration of African-Caribbean and Jewish history and memory in modern Britain

Author: Gemma Romain
Publisher: London : Kegan Paul, 2006.
Series: Kegan Paul studies in anthropology, economy and society.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Ch. 6 (p. 177-214), "Re-remembering and Forgetting Histories: Memories of Racist Riots in Britain", discusses, inter alia, immediate and long-time reactions to the anti-Jewish pogrom wave of 1911 in South Wales, as well as to the anti-Jewish riots in Leeds and in London's Bethnal Green in 1917. In 1911 the non-Jewish press tried to minimize the antisemitic nature of the pogroms and stressed the economic factor;  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Romain, Gemma.
Connecting histories.
London : Kegan Paul, 2006
(OCoLC)607759525
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Gemma Romain
ISBN: 0710312237 9780710312235
OCLC Number: 65468345
Description: viii, 273 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: 1. introduction to historical and ethnic memory in life history : African-Caribbean and Jewish autobiography and oral history --
I. Paradoxes of migration : myths of migration in Jewish and African-Caribbean narrative : the mother country and the promised land --
Introduction : paradoxes of migration --
2. Myths, silence and autobiographical contexts : the autobiographical memory of Ernest Marke and Maurice Levinson --
3. self-knowing autobiographical voice, meta-memory and the deconstruction of myths : Linda Grant, Floella Benjamin, Wallace Collins, and Louis Teeman --
II. 'By the waters of Babylon' : blacks, Jews and diasporic consciousness in the autobiographical act --
Introduction : 'by the waters of Babylon' --
4. Theorisations of the diaspora : race, identity, and historical memory --
5. Memories of 'dwelling' and migration : Britain and the diaspora in travel and migration narratives --
III. Hidden histories, collective memory, remembering and forgetting in black and Jewish ethnic memory --
Introduction : hidden histories, collective memory, remembering and forgetting in black and Jewish ethnic memory --
6. Re-remembering and forgetting histories : memories of racist riots in Britain --
7. Mythology and history : memories of comparative histories, black and Jewish identity and inter-ethnic relations.
Series Title: Kegan Paul studies in anthropology, economy and society.
Responsibility: Gemma Romain.

Abstract:

Ch. 6 (p. 177-214), "Re-remembering and Forgetting Histories: Memories of Racist Riots in Britain", discusses, inter alia, immediate and long-time reactions to the anti-Jewish pogrom wave of 1911 in South Wales, as well as to the anti-Jewish riots in Leeds and in London's Bethnal Green in 1917. In 1911 the non-Jewish press tried to minimize the antisemitic nature of the pogroms and stressed the economic factor; there was also a tendency to blame the victims themselves. The Jewish press and community generally also tried to deny the anti-Jewish element in the riots, as well as anti-Jewish sentiments in Wales. The riots of 1917 did not receive much coverage in the press, both Jewish and non-Jewish. The common sentiment prevalent among British Jews was that these riots, and especially the Jewish self-defense against them, should be forgotten for the sake of social peace. In the last decades, the memory of the pogroms was reclaimed by the Jewish community in Britain, albeit in a moderate path. Discusses some memoirs written by Jews relating the riots, as well as the feature film "Solomon and Gaenor" by Paul Morrison (1999), based on the events in 1911 in Wales. For both Jews and Blacks, the racial riots shattered their image of tolerant Britain, but the responses were different.

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"A clear introduction to a number of important debates concerning autobiography and memory" --Journal of British Studies"

 
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