Contesting conformity democracy and the paradox of political belonging (Book, 2020) [WorldCat.org]
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Contesting conformity democracy and the paradox of political belonging
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Contesting conformity democracy and the paradox of political belonging

Author: Jennie Choi Ikuta
Publisher: New York, NY Oxford University Press [2020] © 2020
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Non-conformity in American public life -- Countering conformity through intellectual freedom in Tocqueville's Democracy in America -- Contesting conformity through individuality in Mill's On liberty -- Refusing conformity through creativity in Nietzsche.
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Additional Physical Format: Erscheint auch als
Ikuta, Jennie
Contesting conformity
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2020]
Online-Ausgabe
(DLC)2019036719
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jennie Choi Ikuta
ISBN: 9780190087845 0190087846
OCLC Number: 1195967649
Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Description: xiv, 178 Seiten 25 cm
Contents: Chapter One: Non-Conformity in American Public LifeChapter Two: Countering Conformity Through Intellectual Freedom in Tocqueville's Democracy in America Chapter Three: Contesting Conformity Through Individuality in Mill's On Liberty Chapter Four: Refusing Conformity Through Creativity in Nietzsche Conclusion
Responsibility: Jennie C. Ikuta.

Abstract:

Non-conformity in American public life -- Countering conformity through intellectual freedom in Tocqueville's Democracy in America -- Contesting conformity through individuality in Mill's On liberty -- Refusing conformity through creativity in Nietzsche.

""Be yourself!" "Don't just follow the crowd!" Such injunctions valorizing non-conformity pervade contemporary American culture. We praise individuals such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Steve Jobs who chart their own course in life and do something new. Yet surprisingly, recent research in social psychology has shown that in practice, Americans are averse to non-conformity. This disjunction between our public rhetoric and practice raises questions: Why is non-conformity valuable? Is it always valuable--or does it pose dangers as well as promise benefits for democratic societies? What is the relationship between non-conformity as an individual ideal and democracy as a form of collective self-rule? Contesting Conformity brings a fresh interpretive lens to the writings of Alexis de Tocqueville, John Stuart Mill, and Friedrich Nietzsche to investigate non-conformity and its relationship to modern democracy. Drawing new insight from their work, Ikuta argues that non-conformity is an intractable issue for democracy. While non-conformity is often important for cultivating a most just polity, non-conformity can also undermine democracy. Insofar as democracy depends on the ability of each citizen to critically reflect and dissent from an unjust public opinion when necessary, Tocqueville and Mill enable us to appreciate non-conformity as an ethical and political ideal for democratic citizens. However, non-conformity can also undermine democracy, as Nietzsche helps us see, insofar as unconstrained expressions of non-conformity may stand in tension with the equality constitutive of democracy. Contesting Conformity demonstrates that while non-conformity can enhance democracy, non-conformity is not necessarily democratic"

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[A] refreshingly clear and deeply provocative book...Contesting Conformity is a deeply engaging work of political theory that challenges us to reconsider our longstanding commitment to nonconformity, Read more...

 
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