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Correctional Education From the Perspective of the Prisoner Student
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Correctional Education From the Perspective of the Prisoner Student

Author: Renee Smiling Hall (Ph.D.); Jim Ed D Killacky
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Journal of Correctional Education, v59 n4 (December 2008): 301 - 320
Other Databases: WorldCat
Summary:
Findings indicate that the prisoner student is filled with regret over past educational experiences and life choices and this regret is a motivator for change, an impetus for attending class and improving themselves. The motivation to attend and persist in class also comes from internal (friends, family, self) and external (judges, parole boards, prison administrators) sources. This motivation may or may not result  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Renee Smiling Hall (Ph.D.); Jim Ed D Killacky
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4769641568
Notes: ANNOTATION: This study examined the correctional education experience from the perspective of the prisoner student.
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Abstract:

Findings indicate that the prisoner student is filled with regret over past educational experiences and life choices and this regret is a motivator for change, an impetus for attending class and improving themselves. The motivation to attend and persist in class also comes from internal (friends, family, self) and external (judges, parole boards, prison administrators) sources. This motivation may or may not result in persistence in a General Equivalency Diploma (GED) course. The field of correctional education may benefit from this study by examining the GED program and its use of inmate tutors. Providing a training course for correctional educators may enhance the quality or instruction of both certified teachers and inmate tutors. The field of elementary and secondary education may benefit society at large by reaching out to at-risk students before they have a chance to be incarcerated. Finally, the field of higher education may benefit from this study's findings by developing ways to provide additional program offerings for the prisoner students. By introducing new courses and programs of study, the Federal and State governments would find a way to provide more funds for the field of correctional education. Data were collected from 10 prisoner students and 2 prison administrators; collection consisted of an open-ended questionnaire designed to gather the perceptions of prisoner students, as well as fully understand the correctional education process. Figure and references

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