Counseling the culturally diverse : theory and practice (Book, 2019) [WorldCat.org]
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Counseling the culturally diverse : theory and practice

Author: Derald Wing Sue; David Sue; Helen A Neville; Laura Smith
Publisher: Hoboken, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2019.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : Eighth editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"This fully revised, 8th edition of the market-leading textbook on multicultural counseling comprehensively covers the most recent research and theoretical formulations that introduce and analyze emerging important multicultural topical developments. It examines the concept of 'cultural humility' as part of the major characteristics of cultural competence in counselor education and practice; roles of white allies in  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Sue, Derald Wing, author.
Counseling the culturally diverse
Hoboken, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2019
(DLC) 2018044428
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Derald Wing Sue; David Sue; Helen A Neville; Laura Smith
ISBN: 9781119448242 1119448247
OCLC Number: 1052905725
Description: xxiii, 520 pages ; 28 cm
Contents: Section One: the multiple dimensions of multicultural counseling and therapy --
Part 1: The effective and conceptual dimensions of multicultural counseling an therapy --
1. Obstacles to developing cultural competence and cultural humility: understanding resistance to multicultural training --
Reactions to reading Counseling the Culturally Diverse --
Emotional self-revelations and fears: majority group members --
Emotional invalidation versus affirmation: marginalized group members --
A word of caution --
Rand understanding resistance to multicultural training Cognitive resistance-denial --
Emotional resistance --
The meaning of anxiety an fear --
The meaning of defensiveness and anger --
The meaning of guild, regret, and remorse --
Behavioral resistance --
Cultural competence and emotions --
Implications for clinical practice --
2. Multicultural counseling and therapy (MCT) --
Culture-universal versus culture-specific formulations --
Cultural concepts of distress --
Acknowledging group differences --
Being aware of collectivistic cultures --
Attuning to cultural and clinical clues --
Balancing the culture-specific and culture-universal orientations --
The nature of multicultural counseling competence --
The harm of cultural insensitivity --
Good counseling is culturally responsive counseling --
A tripartite framework for understanding the multiple dimensions of identity --
Individual level: all individuals are, in some respects, like no other individuals --
Group level: all individuals are, in some respects, like some other individuals --
Universal level: all individuals are, in some respects, like all other individuals --
Individual and universal biases in psychology and mental health --
The impact of group identities on counseling and psychotherapy --
What is multicultural counseling and therapy? --
What is cultural competence? --
Social justice and cultural competence --
Implications for clinical practice --
3. Multicultural counseling competence for counselors and therapists of marginalized groups --
Interracial and inter ethnic biases --
Impact on interracial counseling relationships --
Stereotypes held by socially marginalized group members --
The who-is-more-oppressed game --
Counselors from marginalized groups working with majority and counselors from marginalized group clients --
The politics of inter ethnic and interracial bias and discrimination --
The historical and political relationships between groups of color --
African Americans and Asian Americans --
Asian Americans and Latinx Americans --
Latinx Americans and Black Americans --
American Indians and Black, Latinx, and Asian Americans --
Differences between racial/ethnic groups --
Cultural values --
Communication styles --
Issues regarding stage of ethnic identity --
Counselors of color and dyadic combinations --
Challenges associated with counselor of color and white client dyads --
Challenging the competency of counselors of color --
Needing to prove competence --
Transferring racial animosity toward white clients --
Viewing the counselor of color as a super minority counselor --
Dealing with client expressions of racism --
Challenges associated with counselor of color and client of color dyads --
Over identifying with the client --
Encountering clashes in cultural values --
Experiencing clashes in communication and counseling --
Receiving and expressing racial animosity --
Dealing with the racial identity status of counselors and clients --
Implications for clinical practice --
Part II: The impact and social justice implications of counseling and psychotherapy --
4. The political and social justice implications of counseling and psychotherapy --
The mental health impact of sociopolitical oppression --
Sociopolitical oppression and the training of counseling/mental health professionals --
Definitions of mental health --
Normality as a statistical concept --
Normality as ideal mental health --
Abnormality as the presence of certain behaviors --
Curriculum and training deficiencies --
Counseling and mental health literature --
Pathology and persons of color --
The genetically deficient model --
The culturally diverse model --
The need to treat social problems-social justice counseling --
A failure to develop a balanced perspective between person and system focus can result in false attribution of the problem --
A failure to develop a balanced perspective between person and system focus can result in an ineffective and inaccurate treatment plan potentially harmful to the client --
When the client is an organization or a larger system and not an individual, a major paradigm shift is required to attain a true understanding of problem and solution identification --
Organizations are microcosoms of the wider society from which they originate; as a result, they are likely to be reflections of the monocultural values and practices of the larger culture --
Organizations are powerful entities that inevitably resist change and possess many ways to force compliance among workers; going against the policies, practices, and procedures of the institution, for example, can bring about major punitive actions --
When multicultural organizational development is required, alternative helping roles that emphasize systems intervention and advocacy skills must be part of the repertoire of the mental health professional --
Although remediation will always be needed, prevention is better --
Social justice counseling --
Advocacy for organizational change --
Social justice advocacy and cultural humility --
Social justice advocacy and counseling roles --
Implications for clinical practice --
5. The impact of systemic oppression within the counseling process: client worldviews and counselor credibility --
Locating clients' problems entirely inside the clients --
Culturally related responses that reproduce stereotypes --
Responding when the issues are our own: white fragility --
Effects of historical and current oppression --
Ethnocentric multiculturalism --
Belief in the superiority of the dominant group --
Belief in the inferiority of others --
Power to impose standards --
Manifestation in institutions --
The invisible veil --
Historical manifestations of ethnocentric monoculturalism --
Surviving systemic oppression --
Counselor credibility and attractiveness --
Counselor credibility --
Expertness --
Trustworthiness --
Formation of individual and systemic worldviews --
Locus of control --
Externality and culture --
Externality and sociopolitical factors --
Locus of responsibility --
Formation of worldviews --
Internal locus of control-internal locus of responsibility counseling implications --
External locus of control-internal locus of responsibility counseling implications --
External locus of control-external locus of responsibility counseling implications --
Internal locus of control-external locus of responsibility counseling implications --
implications for clinical practice --
6. Microaggressions in counseling and psychotherapy / Christina M. Capodilupo --
Contemporary forms of oppression --
The evolution of the "isms": microaggressions --
Microassault --
Microinsult --
Microinvalidation --
The dynamics and dilemmas of microaggressions --
The clash of sociodemographic realities --
The invisibility of unintentional expressions of bias --
The perceived minimal harm of microaggressions --
The catch-22 of responding to microaggressions --
Therapeutic implications --
Manifestations of microaggressions in counseling/therapy --
The path forward --
Implications for clinical practice --
Part III: the practice dimensions of multicultural counseling and therapy --
7. Multicultural barriers and the helping professional: the individual interplay of cultural perspectives --
My therapist didn't understand --
Standard characteristics of mainstream counseling --
Culture-bound values --
Focus on the individual --
Verbal/emotional/behavioral expressiveness --
Insight --
Self-disclosure (openness and intimacy) --
Scientific empiricism --
Distinctions between mental and physical functioning --
Patterns of communication --
Class-bound values --
Impact of poverty --
Therapeutic class bias --
Language barriers --
Patterns of American cultural assumptions and multicultural --
Family counseling/therapy --
People-nature dimension --
Time dimension --
Relational dimension --
Activity dimension --
Nature of people dimension --
Overgeneralizing and stereotyping --
Implications for clinical practice --
8. Communication style and its impact on counseling and psychotherapy --
Communication styles --
Nonverbal communication --
Proxemics --
Kinesics --
Paralanguage --
High/low-context communication --
Sociopolitical facets of nonverbal communication --
Nonverbal as reflections of bias --
Non verbals as triggers to biases and fears --
Counseling and therapy as communication style --
Differential skills in MCT --
Implications for MCT --
Implications for clinical practice. 9. Multicultural evidence-based practice --
evidence-based practice and multiculturalism --
Empirically supported treatment --
Implications --
Empirically supported relationships --
The therapeutic alliance --
emotional or interpersonal bond --
Empathy --
Positive regard, respect, warmth, and genuineness --
Self-disclosure --
Management of countertransference --
Goal consensus --
Evidence-based practice and diversity issues in counseling --
Implications for clinical practice --
10. Non-western indigenous methods of healing: implications for multicultural counseling and therapy --
Worldviews and cultural syndromes --
The shaman and traditional healer as therapist: commonalities --
A case of child abuse? --
the principles of indigenous healing --
Holistic outlook, interconnectedness, and harmony --
Belief in metaphysical levels of existence --
Acceptance of spirituality in life and the cosmos --
Examples of indigenous healing approaches --
Ho'oponopono --
Native American sweat lodge ceremony --
dangers and benefits of spirituality --
Implications for clinical practice --
Part IV: racial, ethnic, cultural identity attitudes in multicultural counseling and therapy --
11. Racial, ethnic, cultural identity attitudes in peopl of color: counseling implications --
Racial awakening --
Oriental, Asian, or white--
Denial breakdown --
The internal struggle for identity - Locus of the problem --
REC identity attitude models --
Foundational REC models --
A general model of REC identity --
Conformity status --
Dissonances status --
Resistance and immersion status --
Introspection status --
Integrative awareness status --
Counseling implications of the R/CID model --
Conformity status --
Dissonance status --
Resistance and immersion status --
Introspection status --
Integrative awareness status --
Value of a general REC identity framework --
Implications for clinical practice --
12. White racial identity development: counseling implications --
Understanidng the dynamics of whiteness --
Models of white racial identity development --
The hardiman white racial identity development model --
The helms white racial identity development model --
The process of white racial identity development: a descriptive model seven-step process --
Developing a nonracist and antiracist white identity --
White antiracist identifications --
Principles of prejudice reduction --
Learn about people of color from sources within the group --
Learn from healthy and strong people of the culture --
Learn from experiential reality --
Learn from constant vigilance of your biases and fears --
Learn from being committed to personal action against racism --
Implications for clinical practice --
Section two: Multicultural counseling and specific populations --
Part V: understanding specific populations --
13. Culturally competent assessment --
Therapist variables affecting diagnosis --
Cultural competence and preventing diagnostic errors --
Cultural self-awareness --
Cultural knowledge --
Culturally responsive or multicultural skills --
Contextual and collaborative assessment --
Collaborative conceptualization model --
Principles of collaborative conceptualization --
Infusing cultural relevance into standard clinical assessments --
Cultural formulation interview --
Culturally sensitive intake interview --
Diversity-focused assessment --
Implications for clinical practice --
Part VI: Counseling and therapy with racial/ethnic minority group populations --
14. Counseling African Americans --
Characteristics and strengths --
Racial and ethnic identity --
Implications --
Family structure --
Implications --
Spiritual and religious values --
Educational characteristics --
African American youth --
Cultural strengths --
Specific challenges --
Racism and discrimination --
Implications for clinical practice --
15. Counseling American Indians/Native Americans and Alaska Natives --
Characteristics and strengths --
Tribal social structure --
Family structure --
Cultural and spiritual values --
Cultural strengths --
Specific challenges --
Historical and sociopolitical background --
Educational concerns --
Acculturation conflicts --
Alcohol and substance abuse --
Domestic violence --
Suicide --
Implications for clinical practice --
16. Counseling Asian Americans and pacific islanders --
Characteristics and strengths --
Asian Americans; a success story? --
Collectivistic orientation --
Hierarchical relationships --
Parenting styles --
Emotionality --
Holistic view on mind and body --
Academic and occupational goal orientation --
Cultural strengths --
Specific challenges --
Racial identity issues --
Acculturation conflicts --
Expectations regarding counseling --
Racism and discrimination --
Implications for clinical practice --
17. Counseling Latinx populations --
Characteristics and strengths --
Cultural values and characteristics --
Family structure --
gender role expectations --
Spiritual and religious values --
Educational characteristics --
Cultural strengths --
Specific challenges --
Stigma associated with mental illness --
Acculturation conflicts --
Linguistic issues --
implications for clinical practice --
18. Counseling multiracial populations --
Characteristics and strengths --
Multiracialism in the United States --
The 'one drop of blood' rule --
Strengths --
Specific challenges --
Racial/ethnic ambiguity: what are you --
Racial identity invalidation --
Intermarriage, stereotypes, and myths --
Discrimination and racism --
A multiracial bill of rights --
Implications for clinical practice --
Part VII: Counseling and special circumstances involving racial/ethnic populations --
19. Counseling Arab Americans and Muslim Americans --
Characteristics and strengths --
Arab Americans --
Muslim Americans --
Cultural and religious values --
Family structure and values --
Cultural strengths --
Specific challenges --
Stereotypes, racism, and discrimination --
Acculturation conflicts --
Implications for clinical practice --
20. Counseling immigrants and refugees --
Characteristics and strengths --
Historical and sociopolitical factors --
Cultural and acculturation issues --
Gender issues and domestic violence --
Strengths --
Specific challenges --
Prejudice and discrimination --
Barriers to seek treatment --
Linguistic and communication issues --
Counseling refugees --
Effects of past persecution, torture, or trauma --
Safety issues and coping with loss --
Implications for clinical practice --
21. Counseling Jewish Americans --
Characteristics and strengths --
Spiritual and religious values --
Ethnic identity --
Gender-related considerations --
Cultural strengths --
Specific challenges --
Historical background and sociopolitical challenges --
Prejudice and discrimination --
Implications for clinical practice --
Part VII: Counseling and therapy with other multicultural populations --
22. Counseling individuals with disabilities --
Characteristics and strengths --
The Americans with disabilities Act --
Myths regarding individuals with disabilities --
Models of disability --
Like satisfaction --
Sexuality and reproduction --
Spirituality and religiosity --
Strengths --
Specific challenges --
Prejudice and discrimination --
Supports for individuals with disabilities --
Counseling issues with individuals with disabilities --
Family counseling --
implications for clinical practice --
23. Counseling LGBTQ populations --
Characteristics and strengths --
Sexual and gender identity awareness --
LGBTQ youth --
LGBTQ couples and families --
Strengths --
Specific challenges --
Coming out --
Prejudice, discrimination, and misconceptions --
Aging --
Implications for clinical practice --
24. Counseling older adults --
Characteristics and strengths --
Physical and economic health --
Sexuality in later years --
Strengths --
Specific challenges --
Prejudice and discrimination --
Mental deterioration --
Elder abuse and neglect --
Substance abuse --
Social isolation, depression, and suicide --
Implications for clinical practice --
25. Counseling individuals living in poverty --
Characteristics and strengths --
Strengths --
Specific challenges --
The cultural invisibility and social exclusion of the poor --
educational inequities --
Poverty and mental illness --
Environmental injustice --
Disparities in the judicial system --
Classicism and the minimum wage --
Health care inequities --
Negative attitudes and beliefs --
Implications for clinical practice --
26. Counseling women --
Characteristics and strengths --
Societal roles and expectations --
Strengths --
Specific challenges --
Discrimination, harassment, and victimization --
Educational barriers --
Economic and employment barriers --
Ageism and women --
Depression --
Gender bias in therapy --
Implications for clinical practice.
Responsibility: Derald Wing Sue, David Sue, Helen A. Neville, Laura Smith.

Abstract:

"This fully revised, 8th edition of the market-leading textbook on multicultural counseling comprehensively covers the most recent research and theoretical formulations that introduce and analyze emerging important multicultural topical developments. It examines the concept of 'cultural humility' as part of the major characteristics of cultural competence in counselor education and practice; roles of white allies in multicultural counseling and in social justice counseling; and the concept of 'minority stress' and its implications in work with marginalized populations." -- Provided by publisher.

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