Une culpabilité ordinaire? : Hitler, les Allemands et la Shoah : les enjeux de la controverse Goldhagen (Book, 1997) [WorldCat.org]
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Une culpabilité ordinaire? : Hitler, les Allemands et la Shoah : les enjeux de la controverse Goldhagen

Author: Edouard Husson
Publisher: Paris : F.-X. de Guibert, ©1997.
Edition/Format:   Print book : FrenchView all editions and formats
Summary:
Criticizes Daniel Goldhagen for over-estimating German antisemitism as a motive for the Holocaust and for presenting an over-simplified picture of what drove "ordinary Germans" to become murderers. Pt. 1 (pp. 25-88) compares Goldhagen's analysis of how the members of Reserve Police Battalion 101 became killers, presented in his book "Hitler's Willing Executioners" (1996), to Christopher Browning's views on the same  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Adolf Hitler; Daniel Jonah Goldhagen; Adolf Hitler; Adolf Hitler; Daniel Jonah Goldhagen
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Edouard Husson
ISBN: 2868394566 9782868394569
OCLC Number: 37259340
Description: 198 pages ; 21 cm
Responsibility: Edouard Husson.

Abstract:

Criticizes Daniel Goldhagen for over-estimating German antisemitism as a motive for the Holocaust and for presenting an over-simplified picture of what drove "ordinary Germans" to become murderers. Pt. 1 (pp. 25-88) compares Goldhagen's analysis of how the members of Reserve Police Battalion 101 became killers, presented in his book "Hitler's Willing Executioners" (1996), to Christopher Browning's views on the same subject. Favors Browning's less emotional description of the gradual evolution and personal dynamics of these men, who were not initially disposed to murdering Jews. Pt. 2 (pp. 89-177) discusses the German reception of Goldhagen's work and the controversies it engendered there. Grants Goldhagen credit for reintroducing the essential question of Germany's collective guilt, and for countering efforts by German historians and politicians (such as Ernst Nolte and Chancellor Helmut Kohl) to normalize the Nazi period. Goldhagen has also made it difficult for historians to overlook the question of the legitimacy of the German Federal Republic after 1945. Deals also with the question whether the Holocaust is a subject for historiographical study, and prefers Goldhagen's views to those of Martin Broszat.

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