skip to content
Covid-19 virus
COVID-19 Resources

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID-19) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel). Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this WorldCat.org search. OCLC’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus issues in their communities.

Image provided by: CDC/ Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAM
A cultural history of physics Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

A cultural history of physics

Author: Károly Simonyi; David Kramer
Publisher: Boca Raton, Fla. : CRC Press, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
While the physical sciences are a continuously evolving source of technology and of understanding about our world, they have become so specialized and rely on so much prerequisite knowledge that for many people today the divide between the sciences and the humanities seems even greater than it was when C.P. Snow delivered his famous 1959 lecture, "The Two Cultures." In this work, the author, a Hungarian scientist  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Károly Simonyi; David Kramer
ISBN: 9781568813295 1568813295 9781439865118 1439865116
OCLC Number: 606051425
Notes: "An A K Peters book."
Translated from the German and Hungarian.
Description: xiv, 622 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Contents: Introduction: the history of physic and its relevance to our lives today : The history of physics and its relevance to our lives today ; Assessment and division into epochs : A historical timeline based on the intensity of scientific activity ; Scientific knowledge from the viewpoint of the physicist of today ; Division into epochs based on theoretical synthesis ; The role of modeling. Elements of the philosophy of science : Illusory simplicity ; Reason and experience ; Pitfalls of the inductive method. The dynamism of history : Forces for progress ; Limits, possibilities, and dangers ; Uncertainty in the precision ; Physics in a new role ; Characterization of epochs in physics --
1. The classical heritage : What the Greeks inherited : The beginnings of science ; Egypt and Mesopotamia. The harmonious, beautiful order : Overview: temporal, spatial, and casual connections ; Mysticism and mathematics: Pythagoras ; Idea and reality ; Plato on insight and ideas. Matter and motion: the Aristotelian synthesis : Atoms and elements ; Motion under terrestrial conditions: peripatetic dynamics ; Celestial motion ; The Aristotelian worldview ; A selection from Aristotle's metaphysics. The greatest achievements of the ancient sciences : Archimedes ; The Ptolemiac system for describing celestial motion ; Astronomy and geography ; Geometry ; Scientific instruments and technology. The twilight of Hellenism : Pessimistic philosophers ; Augustine on the absurdity of astrology ; Augustine on time --
2. The stewards of the heritage : The thousand-year balance sheet : Why did progress stall? ; Europe takes shape ; The technological revolution ; Monasteries and universities. The salvage of ancient knowledge : The direct path ; Byzantium ; The Arab transmission ; Return to the source. The Indian and Arab world : The decimal system ; Algebra and algorithm ; Some outstanding contributions of Arab science. The West awakens : Fibonacci: the artist of computation ; Jordanus Nemorarius: structural engineer ; Descriptive kinematics: Nicole Oresme and Merton College ; Peripatetic dynamics reformed ; Buridan's theory of impetus ; Physics in astronomy ; Results ; Nicole Oresme on the motion of earth. Medieval natural philosophy : Faith, authority, and science ; Faith and experience. The Renaissance and physics : Art, philology, and science ; Progress in mechanics ; The science of artists ; Leonardo da Vinci ; The professional astronomers take the stage ; The role of the printing press --
3. Demolition and the construction of a new foundation : The world in 1600 ; Numerology and reality : Back to Plato in a new spirit ; The retrograde revolutionary: Copernicus ; A compromise: Tycho Brahe ; Celestial harmony: Kepler. Galileo and those who stood in his shadow : The unity of the celestial and terrestrial spheres ; Inclined planes, pendulums, and projectile motion ; Galileo's greatness ; In the background: Stevin and Beeckman ; The possibility of connection. The new philosophy: doubt becomes method : Francis Bacon and the inductive method ; A method for discovering certain truth: Descartes ; The Cartesian laws of motion ; The first cosmogony ; On the periphery of western culture. Light, vacuum, and matter through the middle of the seventeenth century : The Snell-Descartes law ; Fermat's principle ; Vacuum and air pressure ; Uncertain steps on the path to modern chemistry. After Descartes and before Newton: Huygens : Huygen's axioms on dynamics ; The mathematical pendulum ; The cycloidal pendulum ; The physical pendulum ; The collision laws as consequences of the equivalence of inertial systems ; Circular motion. Newton and the Principia: the Newtonian worldview : The tasks awaiting the advent of Newton ; A force is not required to maintain a state of motion but to change it ; The law of universal gravitation ; Selections from the Principia ; Newton as philosopher --
4. The completion of classical physics : Starting capital for the eighteenth century : Prior results ; Waves or particles? ; Analytic geometry ; Differential and integral calculus: the battle of the Titans ; For and against Descartes ; Voltaire and the philosophers. Worthy successors: d'Alembert, Euler, and Lagrange : Possible directions for progress ; Results in statics ; Newtonian mechanics in Euler's hands ; The first variational principle in mechanics: Maupertuis ; The first "positivist": d'Alembert ; Modern ideas ; Mechanics as poetry. The century of light : The enlightenment ; The great encyclopedia ; D'Alembert: preface to the encyclopedia ; Belief in the solid foundation of physics: Kant. From effluvium to the electromagnetic field : Peter of Maricourt and Gilbert ; The chronology of progress ; Qualitative electrostatics ; Quantitative electrostatics ; Flow of electric charge ; The magnetic field of electric currents: cross-fertilization from natural philosophy ; The interaction of currents: an extension of Newton's ideas ; Faraday: the greatest of the experimentalists ; Maxwell: the fundamental laws of electromagnetic fields ; The electromagnetics theory of light ; Lorentz's theory of the electron. Heat and energy : The thermometer ; Progressive in its day: the Caloricum theory of Joseph Black ; Rumford: but heat is still a form of motion! ; Fourier's theory of heat conduction ; Caloricum and the state equation ; The Carnot cycle ; The kinetic theory of heat: first steps ; The law of conservation of energy ; The kinetic theory of gases ; The second law of thermodynamics ; Entropy and probability. The structure of matter and electricity: the classical atom : Chemistry hinting at the atomic structure of matter ; The electron: J.J. Thomson ; Chemistry to the rescue again: the periodic table ; First ideas about the structure of the atom ; The line spectrum and the reappearance of the integers ; A farewell to the nineteenth century --
5. The physics of the twentieth century : "Clouds on the horizon of nineteenth-century physics" : A conclusion or a new start? ; Mach and Ostwald. The theory of relativity : Antecedents: failed attempts at measuring absolute velocity ; Attempts at adaptation ; The protagonists: Lorentz, Einstein, and Poincare ; The measurement of distance and time ; The equivalence of energy and mass ; Matter and the geometry of space ; Einstein on space, ether, and the field problem of physics. Quantum theory : Blackbody radiation in classical physics ; Planck: entropy of points the way to the solution ; The appearance of the energy quantum ; Einstein: light is also quantized ; Bohr: the "classical" quantum theory of the atom ; The statistical derivation of the radiation formula as prelude to quantum electronics ; Heisenberg's matrix mechanics ; Einstein and Heisenberg ; Shrodinger's wave mechanics ; Heisenger: the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory ; Operators. Quantum electrodynamics ; The casualty problem ; John von Neumann on causality and hidden parameters ; Quantum mechanics as a tool and as philosophy ; What remains a classical physic?. Nuclear structure, nuclear energy : A backward glance at the first three decades ; Stations of the study of the atomic nucleus ; Becquerel: why do uranium salts fluoresce? ; The protagonists of the heroic age: the Curies and Rutherford ; The Rutherford-Bohr model begins to take shape ; The first artificial nuclear transformation ; Quantum mechanics can be applied to nuclear phenomena ; Predicted by Rutherford, found by Chadwick: the neutron ; Nuclear structure and nuclear models ; Nuclear fission: experimental evidence, theoretical doubt ; The chain reaction: the large-scale liberation of nuclear energy ; Energy through nuclear fusion: the fuel of the stars in the hands of mankind ; The responsibility of physicists. Law and symmetry : The historian's role in the description of modern physics ; The elementary particles in order of appearance ; A few words about cosmic rays ; Particle accelerators and detectors ; Fundamental interactions ; The conservation law ; Symmetry, invariance, conservation ; Mirror symmetry? ; "A bit of asymmetry improves the aesthetics" ; Back to the Apeiron? ; The Quark theory is completed. Mankind and the universe : New information channels ; Energy production in the stars ; Birth, life, death on a cosmic scale ; The formation of the universe. Summary and preview : Physics, philosophy, and society at the turn of the millennium ; The standard model and beyond ; Groups and symmetries ; The grand unification ; The great laboratory ; Questions and doubts multiply ; "Between nothing and infinity".
Other Titles: Fizika kultúrtörténete.
Responsibility: Károly Simonyi ; translated by David Kramer.

Abstract:

Presents a comprehensive history of physics. This book combines a wide-ranging account of the science of physics with an insightful interpretation of the cultural context in which these experimental  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

The book offers a total history of a discipline ... Simonyi ... largely succeeds in fostering the public understanding of a science in its broad historical context. ... In the middle of the book the Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(3)

User lists with this item (4)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


\n\n

Primary Entity<\/h3>\n
<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/606051425<\/a>> # A cultural history of physics<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Book<\/a>, schema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nbgn:translationOfWork<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/606051425#CreativeWork\/unidentifiedOriginalWork<\/a>> ; # Fizika kult\u00FArt\u00F6rt\u00E9nete.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:oclcnum<\/a> \"606051425<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:placeOfPublication<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Place\/boca_raton_fla<\/a>> ; # Boca Raton, Fla.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:placeOfPublication<\/a> <http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/vocabulary\/countries\/mau<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/id.worldcat.org\/fast\/1063025<\/a>> ; # Physics<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/dewey.info\/class\/530.09\/e22\/<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Topic\/physik<\/a>> ; # Physik<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Topic\/physics_history<\/a>> ; # Physics--History<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:bookFormat<\/a> bgn:PrintBook<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:contributor<\/a> <http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/21986668<\/a>> ; # David Kramer<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:copyrightYear<\/a> \"2012<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:creator<\/a> <http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/287810<\/a>> ; # K\u00E1roly Simonyi<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:datePublished<\/a> \"2012<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Introduction: the history of physic and its relevance to our lives today : The history of physics and its relevance to our lives today ; Assessment and division into epochs : A historical timeline based on the intensity of scientific activity ; Scientific knowledge from the viewpoint of the physicist of today ; Division into epochs based on theoretical synthesis ; The role of modeling. Elements of the philosophy of science : Illusory simplicity ; Reason and experience ; Pitfalls of the inductive method. The dynamism of history : Forces for progress ; Limits, possibilities, and dangers ; Uncertainty in the precision ; Physics in a new role ; Characterization of epochs in physics -- 1. The classical heritage : What the Greeks inherited : The beginnings of science ; Egypt and Mesopotamia. The harmonious, beautiful order : Overview: temporal, spatial, and casual connections ; Mysticism and mathematics: Pythagoras ; Idea and reality ; Plato on insight and ideas. Matter and motion: the Aristotelian synthesis : Atoms and elements ; Motion under terrestrial conditions: peripatetic dynamics ; Celestial motion ; The Aristotelian worldview ; A selection from Aristotle\'s metaphysics. The greatest achievements of the ancient sciences : Archimedes ; The Ptolemiac system for describing celestial motion ; Astronomy and geography ; Geometry ; Scientific instruments and technology. The twilight of Hellenism : Pessimistic philosophers ; Augustine on the absurdity of astrology ; Augustine on time -- 2. The stewards of the heritage : The thousand-year balance sheet : Why did progress stall? ; Europe takes shape ; The technological revolution ; Monasteries and universities. The salvage of ancient knowledge : The direct path ; Byzantium ; The Arab transmission ; Return to the source. The Indian and Arab world : The decimal system ; Algebra and algorithm ; Some outstanding contributions of Arab science. The West awakens : Fibonacci: the artist of computation ; Jordanus Nemorarius: structural engineer ; Descriptive kinematics: Nicole Oresme and Merton College ; Peripatetic dynamics reformed ; Buridan\'s theory of impetus ; Physics in astronomy ; Results ; Nicole Oresme on the motion of earth. Medieval natural philosophy : Faith, authority, and science ; Faith and experience. The Renaissance and physics : Art, philology, and science ; Progress in mechanics ; The science of artists ; Leonardo da Vinci ; The professional astronomers take the stage ; The role of the printing press -- 3. Demolition and the construction of a new foundation : The world in 1600 ; Numerology and reality : Back to Plato in a new spirit ; The retrograde revolutionary: Copernicus ; A compromise: Tycho Brahe ; Celestial harmony: Kepler. Galileo and those who stood in his shadow : The unity of the celestial and terrestrial spheres ; Inclined planes, pendulums, and projectile motion ; Galileo\'s greatness ; In the background: Stevin and Beeckman ; The possibility of connection. The new philosophy: doubt becomes method : Francis Bacon and the inductive method ; A method for discovering certain truth: Descartes ; The Cartesian laws of motion ; The first cosmogony ; On the periphery of western culture. Light, vacuum, and matter through the middle of the seventeenth century : The Snell-Descartes law ; Fermat\'s principle ; Vacuum and air pressure ; Uncertain steps on the path to modern chemistry. After Descartes and before Newton: Huygens : Huygen\'s axioms on dynamics ; The mathematical pendulum ; The cycloidal pendulum ; The physical pendulum ; The collision laws as consequences of the equivalence of inertial systems ; Circular motion. Newton and the Principia: the Newtonian worldview : The tasks awaiting the advent of Newton ; A force is not required to maintain a state of motion but to change it ; The law of universal gravitation ; Selections from the Principia ; Newton as philosopher -- 4. The completion of classical physics : Starting capital for the eighteenth century : Prior results ; Waves or particles? ; Analytic geometry ; Differential and integral calculus: the battle of the Titans ; For and against Descartes ; Voltaire and the philosophers. Worthy successors: d\'Alembert, Euler, and Lagrange : Possible directions for progress ; Results in statics ; Newtonian mechanics in Euler\'s hands ; The first variational principle in mechanics: Maupertuis ; The first \"positivist\": d\'Alembert ; Modern ideas ; Mechanics as poetry. The century of light : The enlightenment ; The great encyclopedia ; D\'Alembert: preface to the encyclopedia ; Belief in the solid foundation of physics: Kant. From effluvium to the electromagnetic field : Peter of Maricourt and Gilbert ; The chronology of progress ; Qualitative electrostatics ; Quantitative electrostatics ; Flow of electric charge ; The magnetic field of electric currents: cross-fertilization from natural philosophy ; The interaction of currents: an extension of Newton\'s ideas ; Faraday: the greatest of the experimentalists ; Maxwell: the fundamental laws of electromagnetic fields ; The electromagnetics theory of light ; Lorentz\'s theory of the electron. Heat and energy : The thermometer ; Progressive in its day: the Caloricum theory of Joseph Black ; Rumford: but heat is still a form of motion! ; Fourier\'s theory of heat conduction ; Caloricum and the state equation ; The Carnot cycle ; The kinetic theory of heat: first steps ; The law of conservation of energy ; The kinetic theory of gases ; The second law of thermodynamics ; Entropy and probability. The structure of matter and electricity: the classical atom : Chemistry hinting at the atomic structure of matter ; The electron: J.J. Thomson ; Chemistry to the rescue again: the periodic table ; First ideas about the structure of the atom ; The line spectrum and the reappearance of the integers ; A farewell to the nineteenth century -- 5. The physics of the twentieth century : \"Clouds on the horizon of nineteenth-century physics\" : A conclusion or a new start? ; Mach and Ostwald. The theory of relativity : Antecedents: failed attempts at measuring absolute velocity ; Attempts at adaptation ; The protagonists: Lorentz, Einstein, and Poincare ; The measurement of distance and time ; The equivalence of energy and mass ; Matter and the geometry of space ; Einstein on space, ether, and the field problem of physics. Quantum theory : Blackbody radiation in classical physics ; Planck: entropy of points the way to the solution ; The appearance of the energy quantum ; Einstein: light is also quantized ; Bohr: the \"classical\" quantum theory of the atom ; The statistical derivation of the radiation formula as prelude to quantum electronics ; Heisenberg\'s matrix mechanics ; Einstein and Heisenberg ; Shrodinger\'s wave mechanics ; Heisenger: the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory ; Operators. Quantum electrodynamics ; The casualty problem ; John von Neumann on causality and hidden parameters ; Quantum mechanics as a tool and as philosophy ; What remains a classical physic?. Nuclear structure, nuclear energy : A backward glance at the first three decades ; Stations of the study of the atomic nucleus ; Becquerel: why do uranium salts fluoresce? ; The protagonists of the heroic age: the Curies and Rutherford ; The Rutherford-Bohr model begins to take shape ; The first artificial nuclear transformation ; Quantum mechanics can be applied to nuclear phenomena ; Predicted by Rutherford, found by Chadwick: the neutron ; Nuclear structure and nuclear models ; Nuclear fission: experimental evidence, theoretical doubt ; The chain reaction: the large-scale liberation of nuclear energy ; Energy through nuclear fusion: the fuel of the stars in the hands of mankind ; The responsibility of physicists. Law and symmetry : The historian\'s role in the description of modern physics ; The elementary particles in order of appearance ; A few words about cosmic rays ; Particle accelerators and detectors ; Fundamental interactions ; The conservation law ; Symmetry, invariance, conservation ; Mirror symmetry? ; \"A bit of asymmetry improves the aesthetics\" ; Back to the Apeiron? ; The Quark theory is completed. Mankind and the universe : New information channels ; Energy production in the stars ; Birth, life, death on a cosmic scale ; The formation of the universe. Summary and preview : Physics, philosophy, and society at the turn of the millennium ; The standard model and beyond ; Groups and symmetries ; The grand unification ; The great laboratory ; Questions and doubts multiply ; \"Between nothing and infinity\".<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"While the physical sciences are a continuously evolving source of technology and of understanding about our world, they have become so specialized and rely on so much prerequisite knowledge that for many people today the divide between the sciences and the humanities seems even greater than it was when C.P. Snow delivered his famous 1959 lecture, \"The Two Cultures.\" In this work, the author, a Hungarian scientist and educator succeeds in bridging this chasm by describing the experimental methods and theoretical interpretations that created scientific knowledge, from ancient times to the present day, within the cultural environment in which it was formed. It explores the interplay of science and the humanities to convey the wonder and excitement of scientific development throughout the ages. This book contains excerpts from original resources, explanations, and insight, revealing the historical progress of science and inviting readers into a dialogue with the great scientific minds that shaped our current understanding of physics.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:exampleOfWork<\/a> <http:\/\/worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/id\/363905290<\/a>> ; # Fizika kult\u00FArt\u00F6rt\u00E9nete.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:genre<\/a> \"History<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:inLanguage<\/a> \"en<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"A cultural history of physics<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:productID<\/a> \"606051425<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:publication<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/606051425#PublicationEvent\/boca_raton_fla_crc_press_2012<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:publisher<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Agent\/crc_press<\/a>> ; # CRC Press<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:url<\/a> <https:\/\/ebookcentral.proquest.com\/lib\/exeter\/detail.action?docID=4742624<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:workExample<\/a> <http:\/\/worldcat.org\/isbn\/9781568813295<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:workExample<\/a> <http:\/\/worldcat.org\/isbn\/9781439865118<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nwdrs:describedby<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/606051425<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n\n

Related Entities<\/h3>\n
<http:\/\/dewey.info\/class\/530.09\/e22\/<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Agent\/crc_press<\/a>> # CRC Press<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nbgn:Agent<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"CRC Press<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Place\/boca_raton_fla<\/a>> # Boca Raton, Fla.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Place<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Boca Raton, Fla.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Topic\/physics_history<\/a>> # Physics--History<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:hasPart<\/a> <http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/authorities\/subjects\/sh85101653<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Physics--History<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/363905290#Topic\/physik<\/a>> # Physik<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Physik<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/vocabulary\/countries\/mau<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Place<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\ndcterms:identifier<\/a> \"mau<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/id.worldcat.org\/fast\/1063025<\/a>> # Physics<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Physics<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/21986668<\/a>> # David Kramer<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Person<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:familyName<\/a> \"Kramer<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:givenName<\/a> \"David<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"David Kramer<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/287810<\/a>> # K\u00E1roly Simonyi<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Person<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:familyName<\/a> \"Simonyi<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:givenName<\/a> \"K\u00E1roly<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"K\u00E1roly Simonyi<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/id\/363905290<\/a>> # Fizika kult\u00FArt\u00F6rt\u00E9nete.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Fizika kult\u00FArt\u00F6rt\u00E9nete.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/worldcat.org\/isbn\/9781439865118<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:ProductModel<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"1439865116<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"9781439865118<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/worldcat.org\/isbn\/9781568813295<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:ProductModel<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"1568813295<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"9781568813295<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/606051425<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \ngenont:InformationResource<\/a>, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/606051425<\/a>> ; # A cultural history of physics<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:dateModified<\/a> \"2020-06-20<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nvoid:inDataset<\/a> <http:\/\/purl.oclc.org\/dataset\/WorldCat<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/606051425#CreativeWork\/unidentifiedOriginalWork<\/a>> # Fizika kult\u00FArt\u00F6rt\u00E9nete.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:inLanguage<\/a> \"de<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Fizika kult\u00FArt\u00F6rt\u00E9nete.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n