Darkness at dawn : the rise of the Russian criminal state (Book, 2003) [WorldCat.org]
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Darkness at dawn : the rise of the Russian criminal state

Author: David Satter
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Print book   Computer File : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"This book tells the story of reform in Russia through the real experiences of individual citizens. Describing in detail the birth of a new era of repression, David Satter analyzes the changes that have swept Russia and their effect on Russia's age-old way of thinking." "Through the stories of people at all levels of Russian society, Satter shows the contrast during the reform period between the desperation of the  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Computer File, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David Satter
ISBN: 0300098928 9780300098921 0300105916 9780300105919
OCLC Number: 50803651
Description: 314 pages, 10 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: The Kursk --
Ryazan --
The young reformers --
The history of reform --
The gold seekers --
The workers --
Law enforcement --
Organized crime --
Ulyanovsk --
Vladivostok --
Krasnoyarsk --
The value of human life --
The criminalization of consciousness --
Conclusion : does Russia have a future?
Responsibility: David Satter.

Abstract:

The story of the 1990s reform period in Russia through the experiences of individual citizens. Recounting in detail the development of a new era of oppression, journalist David Satter conveys the  Read more...

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"David Satter has written a compelling and provocative indictment of post-Soviet Russia. He grounds his stern judgment in years of his own reporting on real people's experiences, and he brings to the Read more...

 
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