The Dead Sea scrolls : and the personages of earliest Christianity (eBook, 2004) [WorldCat.org]
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The Dead Sea scrolls : and the personages of earliest Christianity

Author: Arthur E Palumbo
Publisher: New York : Algora Pub., ©2004.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls? Paleographical dating has tended to downplay the Scrolls' importance and to distance them from the personages of earliest Christianity, but a carefully worked out theory based on radiocarbon dating and other tests connects Scroll allusions to personages and events in the period from 37 BC to AD 71 and suggests a new view on how and why the Romans crucified Jesus. Part I of this study  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Trivia and miscellanea
Miscellanea
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Palumbo, Arthur E.
Dead Sea scrolls.
New York : Algora Pub., ©2004
(DLC) 2004009921
(OCoLC)55149606
Named Person: Jesus Christ; Jesus Christ; Jesus Christ.
Material Type: Biography, Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Arthur E Palumbo
ISBN: 0875862985 9780875862989 1280656174 9781280656170
OCLC Number: 56406328
Description: 1 online resource (304 pages) : maps
Contents: Who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls? --
The baptism of John --
John's food and dress --
The first ones --
Zadok --
John the Baptist --
Dositheus --
James the Righteous --
The hymn scroll --
The Kittim --
The lion of wrath --
Herod, Agrippa I, and, Agrippa II --
The coming visitation --
Khirbet Qumran and the scrolls --
The family of Jesus --
Microletters --
The trial and crucifixion of Jesus --
The hypothesis --
The slavonic Josephus --
The fate of the son of Joseph --
Simon Magus --
Saul, Paul, the pillars, and the Twelve --
The creation of Christianity.
Responsibility: Arthur E. Palumbo, Jr.
More information:

Abstract:

Who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls? Paleographical dating has tended to downplay the Scrolls' importance and to distance them from the personages of earliest Christianity, but a carefully worked out theory based on radiocarbon dating and other tests connects Scroll allusions to personages and events in the period from 37 BC to AD 71 and suggests a new view on how and why the Romans crucified Jesus. Part I of this study is an attempt to deal more realistically with the evidence of the Dead Sea Scrolls; very few scholars have ever examined the period from 37 BC to AD 71 as the possible setting for the scrolls. Nevertheless, everyone would admit the existence of scroll allusions that only have real relevance in this time period. Part II takes up Jesus and the beginnings of Christianity. Admittedly, the explanation put forward in this work as to how and why the Romans crucified Jesus is a surprising one and we will not divulge it in this synopsis. However, the way the author sees it, if something like that explanation did not take place, then it is simply inexplicable why the Romans would have crucified Jesus - a peaceful teacher and healer - as a rebel. The only alternative would then have to be that the historical Jesus was really a political revolutionary who attempted in some way to free Israel from the Romans and become its King, a theory that has been offered in various forms beginning in the 18th century. But if he was indeed a rebel then the later Christians, who strenuously strove to live at peace with Rome, must have been the actual creators of the pacifistic Jesus of the New Testament and these unique and time-honored teachings of peace, non-violence, and love were fabrications. That seems less credible than the compelling hypothesis proposed in this work. Arthur E. Palumbo, Jr. has been studying the Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian beginnings for more than twenty years. Several of his articles have appeared in the scholarly journals The Qumran Chronicle and Folia Orientalia.

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