Democracy and political ignorance : why smaller government is smarter (Book, 2013) [WorldCat.org]
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Democracy and political ignorance : why smaller government is smarter
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Democracy and political ignorance : why smaller government is smarter

Author: Ilya Somin
Publisher: Stanford, California : Stanford Law Books, an imprint of Stanford University Press, [2013] ©2013
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
One of the biggest problems with modern democracy is that most of the public is usually ignorant of politics and government. Often, many people understand that their votes are unlikely to change the outcome of an election and don't see the point in learning much about politics. This may be rational, but it creates a nation of people with little political knowledge and little ability to objectively evaluate what they  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ilya Somin
ISBN: 9780804786089 0804786089 9780804786614 0804786615
OCLC Number: 841187563
Description: x, 264 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: The widespread extent of political ignorance --
Do voters know enough? --
The rationality of political ignorance --
The shortcomings of shortcuts --
Foot voting vs. ballot box voting --
Political ignorance and judicial review --
Can voter knowledge be increased?
Responsibility: Ilya Somin.

Abstract:

One of the biggest problems with modern democracy is that most of the public is usually ignorant of politics and government. Often, many people understand that their votes are unlikely to change the outcome of an election and don't see the point in learning much about politics. This may be rational, but it creates a nation of people with little political knowledge and little ability to objectively evaluate what they do know. In Democracy and Political Ignorance, Ilya Somin mines the depths of ignorance in America and reveals the extent to which it is a major problem for democracy. Somin weighs various options for solving this problem, arguing that political ignorance is best mitigated and its effects lessened by decentralizing and limiting government. Somin provocatively argues that people make better decisions when they choose what to purchase in the market or which state or local government to live under, than when they vote at the ballot box, because they have stronger incentives to acquire relevant information and to use it wisely. --

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"The book serves as a highly-readable and accessible introduction to public choice theories of voter behavior and democratic political institutions. Deploying ignorance as an argument against the Read more...

 
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