Designing the creative child : playthings and places in midcentury America (eBook, 2013) [WorldCat.org]
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Designing the creative child : playthings and places in midcentury America
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Designing the creative child : playthings and places in midcentury America

Author: Amy Fumiko Ogata
Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [2013]
Series: Architecture, landscape, and American culture series.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The postwar American stereotypes of suburban sameness, traditional gender roles, and educational conservatism have masked an alternate self-image tailor-made for the Cold War. The creative child, an idealized future citizen, was the darling of baby boom parents, psychologists, marketers, and designers who saw in the next generation promise that appeared to answer the most pressing worries of the age. Designing the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: e-books
Livres numériques
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Ogata, Amy Fumiko, 1965-
Designing the creative child.
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [2013]
(DLC) 2012050732
(OCoLC)816563809
Material Type: Document, Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Amy Fumiko Ogata
ISBN: 9781461931911 1461931916 9781452939247 1452939241
OCLC Number: 1109731338
Notes: Internet - monographie
EN TRAITEMENT.
VERSEMENT EN LOT.
Description: 1 ressource en ligne (xxii, 293, [12] pages of plates) : illustrations (some color).
Contents: ContentsIntroduction: Object Lessons1. Constructing Creativity in Postwar America2. Educational Toys and Creative Playthings3. Creative Living at Home4. Building Creativity in Postwar Schools5. Learning Imagination in Art and ScienceEpilogue: The Legacy of Consuming CreativityAcknowledgmentsNotesBibliographyIndex
Series Title: Architecture, landscape, and American culture series.
Responsibility: Amy F. Ogata.

Abstract:

"The postwar American stereotypes of suburban sameness, traditional gender roles, and educational conservatism have masked an alternate self-image tailor-made for the Cold War. The creative child, an idealized future citizen, was the darling of baby boom parents, psychologists, marketers, and designers who saw in the next generation promise that appeared to answer the most pressing worries of the age. Designing the Creative Child reveals how a postwar cult of childhood creativity developed and continues to this day. Exploring how the idea of children as imaginative and naturally creative was constructed, disseminated, and consumed in the United States after World War II, Amy F. Ogata argues that educational toys, playgrounds, small middle-class houses, new schools, and children's museums were designed to cultivate imagination in a growing cohort of baby boom children. Enthusiasm for encouraging creativity in children countered Cold War fears of failing competitiveness and the postwar critique of social conformity, making creativity an emblem of national revitalization. Ogata describes how a historically rooted belief in children's capacity for independent thinking was transformed from an elite concern of the interwar years to a fully consumable and aspirational ideal that persists today. From building blocks to Gumby, playhouses to Playskool trains, Creative Playthings to the Eames House of Cards, Crayola fingerpaint to children's museums, material goods and spaces shaped a popular understanding of creativity, and Designing the Creative Child demonstrates how this notion has been woven into the fabric of American culture."--Provided by publisher.

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"Amy Ogata's Designing the Creative Child is an exceptionally interesting book on the development of both child psychology and playthings in America during the baby boom years following World War II. Read more...

 
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