The development of mobile logistic support in Anglo-American naval policy, 1900-1953 (Book, 2009) [WorldCat.org]
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The development of mobile logistic support in Anglo-American naval policy, 1900-1953

Author: Peter V Nash
Publisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, ©2009.
Series: New perspectives on maritime history and nautical archaeology.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Nothing is more important than details of logistics and support operations during a military campaign. Without fuel, food, transport, communications, and medical facilities, modern military engagement would be impossible. Peter Nash compares methods the British and American navies developed to supply their ships across vast reaches of the Pacific Ocean during the first part of the twentieth century. He argues that  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Peter V Nash
ISBN: 9780813033679 0813033675
OCLC Number: 262432560
Description: xxxiv, 320 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: Foreword / Vice Adm. Sir Alan Massey --
Naval logistics, 1900-1940: historical perspective, political context --
World War II: the Fleet Train comes of age --
Underway replenishment at sea (UNREP/RAS) --
Postwar logistics: turning practice to procedure --
Fleet sustainability and its effect on auxiliary ship design --
Strategic mobilization: the case for reserve fleets --
Fleet mobility: tactical development, 1944-1953 --
Conclusion --
Appendix A: U.S. Nval Train Squadron, 1926 --
Appendix B: BPF/Fleet Train: planned and actual strengths, 1941-1946 --
Appendix C: Admirality plans (Q) Division, 1944 --
Appendix D: Pacific Ocean distances (miles) --
Appendix E: Task Force 37, BPF, July 13-August 20, 1945 --
Appendix F: The BPF Fleet Train in the Pacific, December 1944-January 1946 --
Appendix G: Replenishment formations, 1946 --
Appendix H: Royal Navy Cruising disposition during replenishment, 1947 --
Appendix I: Replenishment at sea liguids transfer rig comparisons --
Appendix J: Replenishment at sea solids transfer rig comparisons --
Appendix K: USN logisitics plans division OP-12, 1944 --
Appendix L: USN CNO organization, 1945 --
Appendix M: USN CNO logistic agencies, 1942-1946 --
Appendix N: USNWC first-year logistics course, 1947-1948 --
Appendix O: Naval Staff Admiralty, 1948 --
Appendix P: Navel staff Admiralty, January 1952 --
Appendix Q: Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, 1947 --
Appendix R: RFA tanker plan, 1946 --
Appendix S: Proposed USN postwar fleet dispositions, November 1945 --
Appendix T: U.S. Nvy force levels, 1945-1955 --
Appendix U: RN Naval estimates: personnel, active, and reserve fleet statistics, 1945-1955 --
Appendix V: Royal Navy Fleet Train deployed during the Korean War --
Appendix W: USN organization chart for operating forces, 1947 --
Appendix X: Mobile logistic support: related doctrine manuals.
Series Title: New perspectives on maritime history and nautical archaeology.
Responsibility: Peter V. Nash ; foreword by Alan Massey.

Abstract:

Compares the methods the British and American navies developed to supply their ships across the vast reaches of the Pacific Ocean during the first part of the twentieth century.  Read more...

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An excellent nuts-and-bolts examination of how the United States Navy and the Royal Navy learned to keep their fleets supplied (and fighting) on station. A key to understanding not how fleets fought Read more...

 
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