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Diarmaid MacCulloch's A history of Christianity

Author: Diarmaid MacCullochGillian BancroftSiân SaltJerusalem Productions.British Broadcasting Corporation.All authors
Publisher: New York : Ambrose Video Pub., ©2010.
Edition/Format:   DVD video : NTSC color broadcast system : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This six-part series presented by Diarmaid Maculloch reveal the true origins of Christianity and delves into what it means to be a Christian. The first Christianity: Professor MacCullough goes in search of Christianity's forgotten origins. Catholicism: How did a small Jewish sect from the backwoods of Palestine, which preached humility and the virtue of poverty, become the established religion of Western Europe?
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Genre/Form: Television programs
Documentary television programs
Historical television programs
Nonfiction television programs
Religious television programs
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
DVDs
Material Type: Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Diarmaid MacCulloch; Gillian Bancroft; Siân Salt; Jerusalem Productions.; British Broadcasting Corporation.; Open University.; Ambrose Video Publishing.
OCLC Number: 560244554
Language Note: In English with optional Spanish subtitles; closed-captioned.
Notes: Originally broadcast on BBC Four 2009-2010.
Credits: Photography, Mike Jackson (episodes 1, 4, 5), Graham Veevers (episodes 2, 3, 6) ; film editor, Ivan Probert (episodes 1-6), Derek Inglis (episode 3) ; music, James Atherton and Johnny Clifford.
Performer(s): Presenter, Diarmaid MacCulloch.
Description: 6 videodiscs (approximately 360 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Details: DVD, NTSC; widescreen presentation.
Contents: Episode 1. The first Christianity / produced & directed by Gillian Bancroft --
episode 2. Catholicism : the unpredictable rise of Rome / directed & produced by Siân Salt --
episode 3. Orthodoxy : from empire to empire / directed & produced by Siân Salt --
episode 4. Reformation : the individual before God / produced & directed by Gillian Bancroft --
episode 5. Protestantism : the evangelical explosion / produced & directed by Gillian Bancroft --
episode 6. God in the dock / directed & produced by Siân Salt.
Other Titles: First Christianity.
Catholicism, the unpredictable rise of Rome.
Orthodoxy, from empire to empire.
Reformation, the individual before God.
Protestantism, the evangelical explosion.
God in the dock.
History of Christianity
First three thousand years
Responsibility: written & presented by Diarmaid MacCulloch ; Jerusalem Productions ; BBC Productions, Manchester co-production ; the Open University.

Abstract:

This six-part series presented by Diarmaid Maculloch reveal the true origins of Christianity and delves into what it means to be a Christian. The first Christianity: Professor MacCullough goes in search of Christianity's forgotten origins. Catholicism: How did a small Jewish sect from the backwoods of Palestine, which preached humility and the virtue of poverty, become the established religion of Western Europe? Orthodoxy: Professor MacCullough discusses the tumultuous history of Eastern Orthodoxy suffering from Muslim expansion, betrayal by crusading Catholics, and facing near extinction under Soviet Communism. Reformation: Professor MacCullough makes sense of the Reformation and of how faith based on obedience and authority gave birth to one based on individual conscience. Protestantism: Professor MacCullough shows that the original Evangelical explosion was driven by a concern for social justice and the claim that you could stand in a direct emotional relationship with God. In America its preachers marketed Christianity with all the flair and swashbuckling enterprise of American commerce. In Africa it converted much of the continent by adapting to local traditions and now it's expanding into Asia. God in the dock: Professor MacCullough challenges the simplistic notion that faith in Christianity has steadily ebbed away before the relentless advance of science, reason and progress and shows instead how the tide of faith perversely flows back in.

Series: "A History of Christianity, a six-part series presented by Diarmaid MacCulloch, an Oxford history professor whose books about Cranmer and the Reformation have been acclaimed as masterpieces. A History Of Christianity will reveal the true origins of Christianity and delve into what it means to be a Christian. Intelligent, thought-provoking and magisterial in its scope the series will uncover how a small Jewish sect that preached humility became the biggest religion in the world."--Distributor website.

Episode 1, The First Christianity (59 min.): "When he was a small boy Diarmaid MacCulloch's parents used to drive him round historic churches. Little did they know that they had created a monster - the history of the Christian Church became his life's work. Now, no other subject can rival its scale and drama. In the first of a six part series sweeping across four continents, Professor MacCulloch goes in search of Christianity's forgotten origins. He overturns the familiar story that it all began when the apostle Paul took Christianity from Jerusalem to Rome. Instead, he shows that the true origins of Christianity lie east, and that at one point it was poised to triumph in Asia, maybe even in China. The headquarters of Christianity may well have been Baghdad not Rome. And if that had happened Western Christianity would have been very different."--Distributor website.

Episode 2, Catholicism: the unpredictable rise of Rome (59 min.): "Diarmaid MacCulloch's grandfather was a devout pillar of the local Anglican church and felt that any dabbling in Catholicism was liable to pollute the English way of life. But now his grandfather isn't around to stop him exploring the extraordinary and unpredictable rise of the Roman Catholic Church. Over one billion Christians look to Rome - that's more than half of all Christians on the planet. But how did a small Jewish sect from the backwoods of 1st century Palestine, which preached humility and the virtue of poverty, become the established religion of Western Europe - wealthy, powerful and expecting unfailing obedience from the faithful? Amongst the surprising revelations, MacCulloch tells us how confession was invented by monks in a remote island off the coast of Ireland, and how the Crusades gave Britain the university system. Above all, it's a story of what can be achieved when you have friends in high places."--Distributor website.

Episode 3, Orthodoxy: from empire to empire (58 min.): "Today, Eastern Orthodox Christianity flourishes in the Balkans and Russia with over 150 million members worldwide. It's quite unlike Catholicism or Protestantism: worship is carefully choreographed, icons pull the faithful into a mystical union with Christ, and everywhere is a symbol of a fierce-looking bird - the double-headed eagle. What story is this ancient drama trying to tell us? In his third journey into the History of Christianity, Diarmaid MacCulloch charts Orthodoxy's extraordinary fight for survival. After its glory-days in the Eastern Roman Empire, it stood right in the path of Muslim expansion, suffered betrayal by crusading Catholics, was seized by the Russian Tsars and faced near-extinction under Soviet Communism. MacCulloch visits the greatest collection of early icons in the Sinai desert, a surviving relic of the iconoclastic crisis in Istanbul and Ivan the Terrible's Cathedral in Moscow to discover the secret of its endurance."--Distributor website.

Episode 4, Reformation: the individual before God (59 min.): "The Amish today are peaceable folk, but five centuries ago their ancestors were seen as some of the most dangerous people in Europe. They were radicals - Protestants - who tore apart the Catholic Church. In the fourth part of his History of Christianity Diarmaid MacCulloch makes sense of the Reformation, and of how a faith based on obedience and authority gave birth to one based on individual conscience. He shows how Luther wrote hymns to teach people the message of the Bible, and how a tasty sausage became the rallying cry for Ulrich Zwingli - a Swiss Reformer - to tear down statues of saints, allow married clergy and deny that communion bread and wine were the body and blood of Christ. "Jesus ascended into heaven" declared Zwingli, "he's sitting at the right hand of the Father, not on a table here in Zürich."--Distributor website.

Episode 5, Protestantism: the evangelical explosion (59 min.): "In his fifth part of A History of Christianity Diarmaid MacCulloch traces the growth of an exuberant expression of faith that has spread across the globe - Evangelical Protestantism. Today, it's associated with conservative politics, but the whole story is not what you might expect. It's easily forgotten that the Evangelical explosion has been driven by a concern for social justice and the claim that you could stand in a direct emotional relationship with God. It allowed the Protestant faith to burst its boundaries from its homeland in Europe. In America, its preachers marketed Christianity with all the flair and swashbuckling enterprise of American commerce. In Africa it converted much of the continent by adapting to local traditions, and now it's expanding into Asia. But is Korean Pentecostalism and its message of prosperity in the here and now an adaptation too far?"--Distributor website.

Episode 6, God in the dock (59 min.): "Diarmaid MacCulloch's own life story makes him a symbol of a distinctive feature about Western Christianity - scepticism, a tendency to doubt which has transformed Western culture and transformed Christianity. In the last program in the series he asks where that change came from? He challenges the simplistic notion that faith in Christianity has steadily ebbed away before the relentless advance of science, reason and progress and shows instead how the tide of faith perversely flows back in. Despite the attacks of Newton, Voltaire, the French Revolutionaries and Darwin, Christianity has shown a remarkable resilience. The greatest damage to Christianity in fact was inflicted to its moral credibility by the two great wars of the 20th century and by its entanglement with Fascism and Nazism. And yet it is in crisis that the Church has rediscovered deep and enduring truths about itself. And that may even be a clue to its future."--Distributor website.

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A History Of Christianity will reveal the true origins of Christianity and delve into what it means to be a Christian. Intelligent, thought-provoking and magisterial in its scope the series will uncover how a small Jewish sect that preached humility became the biggest religion in the world.\"--Distributor website.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Episode 1. The first Christianity \/ produced & directed by Gillian Bancroft -- episode 2. Catholicism : the unpredictable rise of Rome \/ directed & produced by Si\u00E2n Salt -- episode 3. Orthodoxy : from empire to empire \/ directed & produced by Si\u00E2n Salt -- episode 4. Reformation : the individual before God \/ produced & directed by Gillian Bancroft -- episode 5. Protestantism : the evangelical explosion \/ produced & directed by Gillian Bancroft -- episode 6. 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Amongst the surprising revelations, MacCulloch tells us how confession was invented by monks in a remote island off the coast of Ireland, and how the Crusades gave Britain the university system. Above all, it\'s a story of what can be achieved when you have friends in high places.\"--Distributor website.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Episode 1, The First Christianity (59 min.): \"When he was a small boy Diarmaid MacCulloch\'s parents used to drive him round historic churches. Little did they know that they had created a monster - the history of the Christian Church became his life\'s work. Now, no other subject can rival its scale and drama. In the first of a six part series sweeping across four continents, Professor MacCulloch goes in search of Christianity\'s forgotten origins. He overturns the familiar story that it all began when the apostle Paul took Christianity from Jerusalem to Rome. Instead, he shows that the true origins of Christianity lie east, and that at one point it was poised to triumph in Asia, maybe even in China. The headquarters of Christianity may well have been Baghdad not Rome. And if that had happened Western Christianity would have been very different.\"--Distributor website.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Episode 3, Orthodoxy: from empire to empire (58 min.): \"Today, Eastern Orthodox Christianity flourishes in the Balkans and Russia with over 150 million members worldwide. It\'s quite unlike Catholicism or Protestantism: worship is carefully choreographed, icons pull the faithful into a mystical union with Christ, and everywhere is a symbol of a fierce-looking bird - the double-headed eagle. What story is this ancient drama trying to tell us? In his third journey into the History of Christianity, Diarmaid MacCulloch charts Orthodoxy\'s extraordinary fight for survival. 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<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/504664670#CreativeWork\/first_christianity<\/a>> # First Christianity.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"First Christianity.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/504664670#CreativeWork\/god_in_the_dock<\/a>> # God in the dock.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"God in the dock.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/504664670#CreativeWork\/orthodoxy_from_empire_to_empire<\/a>> # Orthodoxy, from empire to empire.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Orthodoxy, from empire to empire.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/504664670#CreativeWork\/protestantism_the_evangelical_explosion<\/a>> # Protestantism, the evangelical explosion.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Protestantism, the evangelical explosion.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/504664670#CreativeWork\/reformation_the_individual_before_god<\/a>> # Reformation, the individual before God.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Reformation, the individual before God.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/504664670#Topic\/christentum<\/a>> # Christentum<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Christentum<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/authorities\/classification\/BR145<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/vocabulary\/countries\/nyu<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Place<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\ndcterms:identifier<\/a> \"nyu<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/id.worldcat.org\/fast\/859599<\/a>> # Christianity<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Christianity<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/id.worldcat.org\/fast\/860740<\/a>> # Church history<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Church history<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/122129883<\/a>> # Gillian Bancroft<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Person<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:familyName<\/a> \"Bancroft<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:givenName<\/a> \"Gillian<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Gillian Bancroft<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/126787328<\/a>> # Ambrose Video Publishing.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Organization<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Ambrose Video Publishing.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/127458402<\/a>> # British Broadcasting Corporation.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Organization<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"British Broadcasting Corporation.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/130588515<\/a>> # Jerusalem Productions.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Organization<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Jerusalem Productions.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/152430895<\/a>> # Open University.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Organization<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Open University.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/19699840<\/a>> # Diarmaid MacCulloch<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Person<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:familyName<\/a> \"MacCulloch<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:givenName<\/a> \"Diarmaid<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Diarmaid MacCulloch<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/279033201<\/a>> # Si\u00E2n Salt<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Person<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:familyName<\/a> \"Salt<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:givenName<\/a> \"Si\u00E2n<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Si\u00E2n Salt<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/560244554<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \ngenont:InformationResource<\/a>, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/560244554<\/a>> ; # Diarmaid MacCulloch\'s A history of Christianity<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:dateModified<\/a> \"2019-11-22<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nvoid:inDataset<\/a> <http:\/\/purl.oclc.org\/dataset\/WorldCat<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/560244554#CreativeWork\/unidentifiedOriginalWork<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:inLanguage<\/a> \"en<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n