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An end to poverty? : a historical debate

Author: Gareth Stedman Jones
Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2004
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"In the 1790s, for the first time, reformers proposed bringing poverty to an end. Inspired by scientific progress, the promise of an international economy, and the revolutions in France and the United States, political thinkers such as Thomas Paine and Antoine-Nicolas Condorcet argued that all citizens could be protected against the hazards of economic insecurity. In An End to Poverty? Gareth Stedman Jones revisits  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Gareth Stedman Jones
ISBN: 9780231137829 0231137826 9780231137836 0231137834
OCLC Number: 1041408373
Description: 278 p.
Contents: The French Revolution --
The reaction in Britain --
The reaction in France --
Globalisation : the "proletariat" and the "industrial revolution" --
The wealth of Midas --
Resolving "the social problem."
Responsibility: Gareth Stedman Jones.

Abstract:

"In the 1790s, for the first time, reformers proposed bringing poverty to an end. Inspired by scientific progress, the promise of an international economy, and the revolutions in France and the United States, political thinkers such as Thomas Paine and Antoine-Nicolas Condorcet argued that all citizens could be protected against the hazards of economic insecurity. In An End to Poverty? Gareth Stedman Jones revisits this founding moment in the history of social democracy and examines how it was derailed by conservative as well as leftist thinkers. By tracing the historical evolution of debates concerning poverty, Stedman Jones revives an important, but forgotten strain of progressive thought. He also demonstrates that current discussions about economic issues - downsizing, globalization, and financial regulation - were shaped by the ideological conflicts of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries."--Jacket.

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