Ending midlife bias : new values for old age (Book, 2020) [WorldCat.org]
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Ending midlife bias : new values for old age

Author: Nancy Ann Silbergeld Jecker
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2020]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"We live at a time when the human lifespan has increased like never before. As average lifespans stretch to new lengths, what impact should this have on our values? Should our values change over the course of our ever-increasing lifespans? Nancy S. Jecker coins the term, the life stage relativity of values, to capture the idea that at different stages of our lives, different ethical concerns shift to the foreground.  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Electronic version:
Jecker, Nancy Ann Silbergeld.
Ending midlife bias.
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2020
(OCoLC)1157286297
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Nancy Ann Silbergeld Jecker
ISBN: 0190949074 9780190949075
OCLC Number: 1139939565
Description: xiii, 344 pages : illustration ; 25 cm
Contents: Part I. The philosophical framework --
Values across the lifespan --
What matters for individuals in later life? The preferred account of human capabilities --
Time's passage and the narrative self --
Justice between old and young --
Part II. Policy and practice --
Healthcare across the lifespan --
Who cares? --
What cares? --
Ageism --
The dying, the newly dead, and the long gone --
Future people --
The coming of age of old age.
Responsibility: Nancy S. Jecker.

Abstract:

"We live at a time when the human lifespan has increased like never before. As average lifespans stretch to new lengths, what impact should this have on our values? Should our values change over the course of our ever-increasing lifespans? Nancy S. Jecker coins the term, the life stage relativity of values, to capture the idea that at different stages of our lives, different ethical concerns shift to the foreground. During early life, infants and small children hold dear the value of being cared for and nurtured by someone they trust--and their vulnerability and dependency make these the right values for them. By early adulthood and continuing into midlife, the capacity for greater physical and emotional independence gives people reason to place more emphasis on autonomy and the ability to freely choose and carry out their plan of life. During old age, heightened risk for chronic disease and disability gives us a reason to shift our focus again, emphasizing safeguarding our central capabilities and keeping our dignity and self-respect intact. Despite different values becoming central at different stages of life, we often assume the standpoint of someone in midlife, who is in the midst of planning a future adulthood that stretches out before them. Jecker coins the term, midlife bias, to refer to the privileging of midlife. Midlife bias occurs when we assume that autonomy should be our central aim at all life stages and give it priority in a wide range of ethical decisions. The privileging of midlife raises fundamental problems of fairness. It also suggests the possibility of large gaps in the ethical principles and theories at hand. Ending Midlife Bias: New Values for Old Age addresses these concerns in a step-wise fashion, focusing on later life. Jecker first introduces a philosophical framework that extends moral theorizing to older adults, addressing midlife bias, the life stage relativity of values, human capabilities and dignity, time's passage, the narrative self, and justice between old and young. She then turns to policy and practice and explores ethical issues in bioethics, long term care, personal robotic assistants, care of the dying and newly dead, ageism in medical research, the allocation of healthcare, mandatory retirement, and the future of population aging"--Publisher's website.

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The first 50 years of American bioethics focused attention on autonomy in relation to suffering, medical technology, and the end of life. Yet the long last stage of life * the decades from midlife Read more...

 
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