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English verse: voice and movement from Wyatt to Yeats

Author: T R Barnes
Publisher: Cambridge, Cambridge U.P., 1967.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Every poet has a characteristic tone of voice, and his own rhythm. The author's chief interest is this 'sound poems make in the head', and his particular gift is to help us to hear what is going on in the individual poem, and to catch the poet's individuality. We also hear how each poet develops the forms his predecessors have used. In this way, we move from a consideration of single voices to the development of  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Barnes, T.R.
English verse: voice and movement from Wyatt to Yeats.
Cambridge, Cambridge U.P., 1967
(OCoLC)574325915
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: T R Barnes
OCLC Number: 953508
Description: ix, 324 pages 23 cm
Contents: The Sixteenth Century --
Blank Verse --
The Seventeenth Century --
The Eighteenth Century --
The Romantics --
The Victorians --
The Twentieth Century.
Responsibility: [by] T.R. Barnes.

Abstract:

Every poet has a characteristic tone of voice, and his own rhythm. The author's chief interest is this 'sound poems make in the head', and his particular gift is to help us to hear what is going on in the individual poem, and to catch the poet's individuality. We also hear how each poet develops the forms his predecessors have used. In this way, we move from a consideration of single voices to the development of particular forms (like the couplet or blank verse) and the characteristics of whole periods. This book, then, has several uses. While verse as sound is its main concern, it can be read as an introductory history of English verse from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. Since the author quotes generously, he also provides as he goes along an unhackneyed anthology in chronological order. In addition, he comments in detail on many of the poems, so that the book is a demonstration of the methods and uses of practical criticism.

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