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The essential Jefferson;

Author: Thomas Jefferson; Albert Fried
Publisher: New York, Collier Books [1963]
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : [1st ed.]View all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Biographies
Biography
Named Person: Thomas Jefferson; Thomas Jefferson; Thomas Jefferson
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Jefferson; Albert Fried
OCLC Number: 1239630
Description: 576 pages 18 cm
Contents: pt. I. EARLY YEARS: 1743-1774 : --
Introduction --
A More Universal Acquaintance - To John Harvie, January 14, 1760 --
Overwhelmed with Misfortunes - To John Page, December 25, 1762 --
Perfect Resignation - To John Page, July 15, 1763 --
My Strange Confusion - To John Page, October 7, 1763 --
I Do Not Like the Ups and Downs of a Country Life - To William Fleming [ca. October 1763] --
Many and Great Are the Comforts of a Single State - To William Fleming, March 20, 1764 --
Let Him Employ His Time for Himself Alone - To Thomas Turpin, February 5, 1769 --
Happy Ruler of a Free and Happy People - Resolution for an Answer to Governor Botetourt's Speech, May 8, 1769 --
pt. II. REVOLUTIONIST: 1774-1778 : --
Introduction --
Deal Out to All Equal and Impartial Right - Summary View of the Rights of British America, August 1774 --
A Phrensy of Revenge - To Dr. William Small, May 7, 1775 --
For Us, Not for Them, Has Government Been Instituted Here - Virginia Resolutions on Lord North's Conciliation Proposal, June 10, 1775 --
This Great Decision - Declaration of the Causes and Necessity for Taking Up Arms, July 6, 1775 --
Our Real Determinations - To John Randolph, August 25, 1775 --
The Rights of Nations - Declaration on the Treatment of Ethan Allen, January 2, 1776 --
New-Modelling the Form of Government - the Virginia Constitution, before June 13, 1776 --
These United Colonies Are Free and Independent States - Notes of Proceedings in the Continental Congress, June 7 to August 1, 1776 --
To Assume Among the Powers of the Earth a Separate and Equal Station - Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 --
Shall Have Full Power to Pass, Convey or Use - A Bill to Enable Tenants in Free Tail to Convey Their Lands in Fee Simple, October 14, 1776 --
A Church Is a Voluntary Society of Men - Notes on Locke and Shaftesbury, 1776 --
The Favorite Passion of My Soul - To Giovanni Fabbroni, June 8, 1778 --
pt. III. LEGISLATOR AND GOVERNOR : 1779-1781 : --
Introduction --
The Protection of the Law - A Bill Concerning Slaves (chapter 51), 1779 --
The Natural Right of Seeking Subsistence and Happiness - A Bill Declaring Who Shall Be Deemed Citizens (chapter 55), 1779 --
To Restrain Such Criminal Acts - A Bill for Proportioning Crimes and Punishments (chapter 64), 1779 --
To Illuminate the Minds of the People at Large - A Bill for the More General Diffusion of Knowledge (chapter 79), 1779 --
By Indulging the Researches of the Learned and Curious - A Bill for Establishing a Public Library (chapter 81), 1779 --
The Opinions of Men Are Not the Objects of Civil Government - A Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom (chapter 82), 1779 --
Such a One May Keep Us Above Water - To Richard Henry Lee, September 13, 1780 --
This Shameful Desertion - To George Washington, with a Narrative of the Battle of Camden, September 3, 1780 --
Oppressed with the Labors of My Office - To Washington, May 28, 1781 --
I Have Taken My Final Leave of Every Thing - To Edmund Randolph, September 16, 1781 --
These Intimations Hanging over Our Head - Charges by George Nicholas with Jefferson's Answers, [after July 31, 1781] --
The Tool Worked with by Another Hand - To Isaac Zane, December 24, 1781 --
pt. IV. NOTES ON VIRGINIA : 1781-1782 : --
Introduction --
In Answer to Certain Queries - Notes on Virginia, 1781-1782 --
pt. V. DELEGATE AND MINISTER : 1783-1789 --
Introduction --
On An Equal Footing - The Western Territory, March 1784 --
The Most Easy Ratio Is by Ten - Notes on the Establishment of a Money Unit, and of a Coinage for the United States, April 1784 --
Encourage All your Virtuous Dispositions - To Peter Carr, August 19, 1785 --
The Most Valuable Citizens - To John Jay, August 23, 1785 --
The Laboring People Began to be Alarmed at This New Institution - The Society of Cincinnati, June 22, 1786 --
The People Alone Can Protect Us Against These Evils - To George Wythe, August 13, 1786 --
The Paroxysm Can Never Return - To Maria Cosway, October 12, 1786 --
It Is a Medicine Necessary for the Sound Health of Government - To James Madison, January 30, 1787 --
They Are Like Pure Metal - To Madison, June 20, 1787 --
The Tree of Liberty Must be Refreshed with the Blood of Patriots and Tyrants - To William Stephen Smith, November 13, 1787 --
The Will of the Majority Should Prevail - To James Madison, December 20, 1787 --
There Is a Great Deal of Good in It - To Washington, May 3, 1788 --
By Way of Supplement - To James Madison, March 15, 1789 --
To Avoid the Ill Which Seems to Threaten - To Rabaut Saint-Etienne, June 3, 1789 --
The Earth Belongs to Usufruct to the Living - To James Madison, September 6, 1789 --
pt. VI. SECRETARY OF STATE : 1790-1793 --
Introduction --
The Only Sure Guardian of the Rights of Man - Response to the Address of the Citizens, February 12, 1790 --
A Puzzle and a Machine - Anas, February 4, 1818 --
Convenience Cannot Constitute Necessity - Opinion on the Constitutionality of a National Bank, February 15, 1791 --
We Have Differed As Friends - To John Adams, July 17, 1791 --
It Is Not Near Enough for My Wishes - To Martha Jefferson Randolph, January 15, 1792 --
They Had Chained It About our Necks - Anas, February 28 - March 1, 1792 --
This Is the Event at Which I Tremble - To George Washington, May 23, 1792 --
Go on Doing with Your Pen - To Thomas Paine, June 19, 1792 --
His System Flowed from Principles Adverse to Liberty - To George Washington, September 9, 1792 --
A Numerous Sect - Anas, October 1, 1792 --
The Arm of the People - To William Short, January 3, 1793 --
A Corrupt Squadron of Voters in Congress - Anas, February 7, 1793 --
The Source of All Authority - Opinion on French Treaties, April 28, 1793 --
A Manly Neutrality - To James Madison, May 13, 1793 --
His Paper Has Saved Our Constitution - Anas, August 2, 1793 --
I Would Have Chosen Them to be Doubtful - Anas, November 18, 28, 1793 --
pt. VII. DEMOCRATIC-REBUBLICAN ; 1794-1801 : --
Introduction --
They Will Triumph Completely - To Tench Coxe, May 1, 1794 --
The Glittering of Crowns and Coronets - To James Madison, December 28, 1794 --
Two Parties Then Do Exist - Notes on Christoph Daniel Ebeling's Letter of July 30, 1795 --
A Burst of Dissatisfaction - To James Monroe, September 6, 1795 --
Their Heads Shorn by the Harlot England - To Phillip Mazzei, April 24, 1796 --
This Has Never Been from Under My Own Lock and Key - To George Washington, June 19, 1796 --
The Only Sure Barrier - To James Madison, January 1, 1797 --
It Could Not Brook Contradiction - To Archibold Stuart, January 4, 1797 --
My Zealous Attachment to the Constitution - Vice Presidential Inaugural Address, March 4, 1797 --
He Returned to His Former Party Views - Anas, March 2 - 6, 1797 --
That There Were an Ocean of Fire Between Us - To Elbridge Gerry, May 13, 1797 --
Against All Popular Storms and Passions - Anas, February 15, 1798 --
Will the Evil Stop There? - To John Taylor, June 1, 1798 --
To Nullify of Their Own Authority - The Kentucky Resolutions, November 1798 --
There, My Friend, Are My Principles - To Elbridge Gerry, January 26, 1799 --
Doing Nothing Which May Hoop Them Together - To Madison November 26, 1799 --
Signs of It Will Be Their Respect for You - To Joseph Priestley, January 27, 1800 --
This Simple and Economical Mode of Government - To Gideon Granger, August 13, 1800 --
I Have Sworn upon the Alter of God ... - To Dr. Benjamin Rush, September 23, 1800 --
I Avoid Giving Any answer - Anas, April 15, 1806 --
I Will Give to That Will a Faithful Execution - Reply to Notification of Election, February 20, 1801 --
Pt. VII. PRESIDENT : 1801 - 1809 : --
Introduction --
We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists - First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1801 --
The Band Is Removed - To John Dickinson, March 6, 1801 --
Sentiments Worthy of Former Times - To Thomas Paine, March 18, 1801 --
The Barbarians Really Flattened Themselves - To Joseph Priestley, March 21, 1801 --
The Storm Is Over, and We Are in Port - To Samuel Adams, March 29, 1801 --
Their Total Exclusion Calls for Prompter Corrections - To a Committee of the Merchants of New Haven, July 12, 1801 --
I Have Begun the Reduction of What Was Deemed Necessary - First Annual Message to Congress, December 8, 1801 --
A Haven for the Oppressed - To Mazzei, December 30, 1801 --
To Restore to Man All His Natural Rights - Reply to a Committee of the Danbury, Connecticut Baptist Association, January 11, 1802 --
From That Moment We Must Marry Ourselves to the British Fleet and Nation - To Robert R. Livingston, April 18, 1802 --
Even to the Western Ocean - Confidential Message to Congress on a Western Exploring Expedition, January 18, 1803 --
Love, Charity, Peace - To Dr. Benjamin Rush, April 21, 1803 --
Let Us Receive Them - Article on Conciliation with the Federalists, June 1, 1803 --
I Prefer That Which Is Safe and Precise - To Wilson C. Nicholas, September 7, 1803 --
The Property and Sovereignty of All Louisiana - Third Annual Message, October 17, 1803 --
All Are Perfectly Equal - Rules of Etiquette in Washington, November [7], 1803 --
Morality Listens to This - To Jean Baptiste Say, February 1, 1804 --
Proofs of My Great Respect for You - To Mrs. John Adams, September 11, 1804 --
The Disposition to Be Just - To William Burwell, January 28, 1805 --
Facts Are Piercing Through - Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805 --
New Principles Have Been Interloped into the Law of Nations - Fifth Annual Message, December 3, 1805 --
You Must Not Commit Yourself to Him - To James Monroe, May 4, 1806 --
The Articles of Public Care - Sixth Annual Message, December 2, 1806 --
To Depart from the Same - Chesapeake Proclamation, July 2, 1807 --
These Aggravations - Seventh Annual Message, October 27, 1807 --
The Principles of Humanity - To Messrs. Thomas, Ellicot, et al., November 13, 1807 --
To Do No Act Which Shall Impair that Principle - To The Representatives of The New Jersey Legislature, December 10, 1807 --
The Manufacturer and Husbandman Side by Side - To The Society of Tammany, or Columbian Order No. 1, of the City of New York, February 29, 1808 --
A Crop of Sudden and Rank Growth - to Gallatin, August 16, 1808 --
The Moderation and Firmness Which Govern Our Councils - Eighth Annual Message, November 8, 1808 --
We Have Suffered Some Loss - Reply to Taber Fitch, November 21, 1808 --
Get by Them As You Would by an Angry Bull - To Thomas Jefferson Randolph, November 24, 1808 --
You Will Unite Yourselves with Us - To Captain Hendrick, The Delawares, Mohlcans, and Munries, [n.d.] --
On an Equal Footing - To M. Henri Gregoire, Eveque et Senateur a Paris, February 25, 1809 --
The Hermit of Monticello - To M. Du Pont de Nemours, March 2, 1809 --
pt. IX. MONTICELLO : 1809-1826 --
Introduction --
On Your Verdict I Rest - To the Inhabitants of Albemarle County, April 3, 1809 --
Everything Which Has Passed Between Us - To Dr. Benjamin Rush, January 16, 1811 --
Their Minds Keep Pace with Their Bodies - To Dr. Benjamin Rush, August 17, 1811 --
You and I Have Been Wonderfully Spared - To John Adams, January 21, 1812 --
A Man of Debate Only - On Patrick Henry, 1812, 1824 --
An American Dialect Will be Formed - To John Waldo, August 16, 1813 --
The Grounds of This Are Virtue and Talents - To John Adams, October 28, 1813 --
A Wise, a Good, and a Great Man - On George Washington, January 2, 1814 --
Your Solitary but Welcome Voice - to Edward Coles, August 25, 1814 --
Every Branch of Science - to Peter Carr, September 7, 1814 --
Experience Has Taught Me - to Benjamin Austin, January 9, 1816 --
More or Less of This Ingredient - To John Taylor, May 28, 1816 --
I Am Not Among Those Who Fear the People - to Samuel Kercheval, July 12, 1816 --
There Would Never Have Been an Infidel - To Mrs. Samuel Harrison Smith, August 6, 1816 --
Not Now Very Distant - To Abigail Adams, January 11, 1817 --
Your Heavy Affliction - To John Adams, November 13, 1818 --
I Have Lived Temperately - To Dr. Vine Utley, March 21, 1819 --
I Too Am an Epicurean - To William Short, October 31, 1819 --
A Fire Bell in the Night - To John Holmes, April 22, 1820 --
The General Religion - To James Smith, December 8, 1822 --
That Wholesome Distribution of Powers - To William Johnson, June 12, 1823 --
Through the Ocean of Time - To President James Monroe, October 24, 1823 --
Nothing Then Is Unchangeable but the Inherent and Unalienable Rights of Man - To Major John Cartwright, June 5, 1824 --
Your Benefactor in Peace As Well As in War - Speech on Lafayette, November 4, 1824 --
Take Care of Me When Dead - To James Madison, February 17, 1826 --
The Choice We Made - To Roger C. Weightman, June 24, 1826.
Responsibility: edited, and with an introd., by Albert Fried.

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    schema:description "pt. I. EARLY YEARS: 1743-1774 : -- Introduction -- A More Universal Acquaintance - To John Harvie, January 14, 1760 -- Overwhelmed with Misfortunes - To John Page, December 25, 1762 -- Perfect Resignation - To John Page, July 15, 1763 -- My Strange Confusion - To John Page, October 7, 1763 -- I Do Not Like the Ups and Downs of a Country Life - To William Fleming [ca. October 1763] -- Many and Great Are the Comforts of a Single State - To William Fleming, March 20, 1764 -- Let Him Employ His Time for Himself Alone - To Thomas Turpin, February 5, 1769 -- Happy Ruler of a Free and Happy People - Resolution for an Answer to Governor Botetourt's Speech, May 8, 1769 -- pt. II. REVOLUTIONIST: 1774-1778 : -- Introduction -- Deal Out to All Equal and Impartial Right - Summary View of the Rights of British America, August 1774 -- A Phrensy of Revenge - To Dr. William Small, May 7, 1775 -- For Us, Not for Them, Has Government Been Instituted Here - Virginia Resolutions on Lord North's Conciliation Proposal, June 10, 1775 -- This Great Decision - Declaration of the Causes and Necessity for Taking Up Arms, July 6, 1775 -- Our Real Determinations - To John Randolph, August 25, 1775 -- The Rights of Nations - Declaration on the Treatment of Ethan Allen, January 2, 1776 -- New-Modelling the Form of Government - the Virginia Constitution, before June 13, 1776 -- These United Colonies Are Free and Independent States - Notes of Proceedings in the Continental Congress, June 7 to August 1, 1776 -- To Assume Among the Powers of the Earth a Separate and Equal Station - Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 -- Shall Have Full Power to Pass, Convey or Use - A Bill to Enable Tenants in Free Tail to Convey Their Lands in Fee Simple, October 14, 1776 -- A Church Is a Voluntary Society of Men - Notes on Locke and Shaftesbury, 1776 -- The Favorite Passion of My Soul - To Giovanni Fabbroni, June 8, 1778 -- pt. III. LEGISLATOR AND GOVERNOR : 1779-1781 : -- Introduction -- The Protection of the Law - A Bill Concerning Slaves (chapter 51), 1779 -- The Natural Right of Seeking Subsistence and Happiness - A Bill Declaring Who Shall Be Deemed Citizens (chapter 55), 1779 -- To Restrain Such Criminal Acts - A Bill for Proportioning Crimes and Punishments (chapter 64), 1779 -- To Illuminate the Minds of the People at Large - A Bill for the More General Diffusion of Knowledge (chapter 79), 1779 -- By Indulging the Researches of the Learned and Curious - A Bill for Establishing a Public Library (chapter 81), 1779 -- The Opinions of Men Are Not the Objects of Civil Government - A Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom (chapter 82), 1779 -- Such a One May Keep Us Above Water - To Richard Henry Lee, September 13, 1780 -- This Shameful Desertion - To George Washington, with a Narrative of the Battle of Camden, September 3, 1780 -- Oppressed with the Labors of My Office - To Washington, May 28, 1781 -- I Have Taken My Final Leave of Every Thing - To Edmund Randolph, September 16, 1781 -- These Intimations Hanging over Our Head - Charges by George Nicholas with Jefferson's Answers, [after July 31, 1781] -- The Tool Worked with by Another Hand - To Isaac Zane, December 24, 1781 -- pt. IV. NOTES ON VIRGINIA : 1781-1782 : -- Introduction -- In Answer to Certain Queries - Notes on Virginia, 1781-1782 -- pt. V. DELEGATE AND MINISTER : 1783-1789 -- Introduction -- On An Equal Footing - The Western Territory, March 1784 -- The Most Easy Ratio Is by Ten - Notes on the Establishment of a Money Unit, and of a Coinage for the United States, April 1784 -- Encourage All your Virtuous Dispositions - To Peter Carr, August 19, 1785 -- The Most Valuable Citizens - To John Jay, August 23, 1785 -- The Laboring People Began to be Alarmed at This New Institution - The Society of Cincinnati, June 22, 1786 -- The People Alone Can Protect Us Against These Evils - To George Wythe, August 13, 1786 -- The Paroxysm Can Never Return - To Maria Cosway, October 12, 1786 -- It Is a Medicine Necessary for the Sound Health of Government - To James Madison, January 30, 1787 -- They Are Like Pure Metal - To Madison, June 20, 1787 -- The Tree of Liberty Must be Refreshed with the Blood of Patriots and Tyrants - To William Stephen Smith, November 13, 1787 -- The Will of the Majority Should Prevail - To James Madison, December 20, 1787 -- There Is a Great Deal of Good in It - To Washington, May 3, 1788 -- By Way of Supplement - To James Madison, March 15, 1789 -- To Avoid the Ill Which Seems to Threaten - To Rabaut Saint-Etienne, June 3, 1789 -- The Earth Belongs to Usufruct to the Living - To James Madison, September 6, 1789 --"@en ;
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    schema:description "pt. VI. SECRETARY OF STATE : 1790-1793 -- Introduction -- The Only Sure Guardian of the Rights of Man - Response to the Address of the Citizens, February 12, 1790 -- A Puzzle and a Machine - Anas, February 4, 1818 -- Convenience Cannot Constitute Necessity - Opinion on the Constitutionality of a National Bank, February 15, 1791 -- We Have Differed As Friends - To John Adams, July 17, 1791 -- It Is Not Near Enough for My Wishes - To Martha Jefferson Randolph, January 15, 1792 -- They Had Chained It About our Necks - Anas, February 28 - March 1, 1792 -- This Is the Event at Which I Tremble - To George Washington, May 23, 1792 -- Go on Doing with Your Pen - To Thomas Paine, June 19, 1792 -- His System Flowed from Principles Adverse to Liberty - To George Washington, September 9, 1792 -- A Numerous Sect - Anas, October 1, 1792 -- The Arm of the People - To William Short, January 3, 1793 -- A Corrupt Squadron of Voters in Congress - Anas, February 7, 1793 -- The Source of All Authority - Opinion on French Treaties, April 28, 1793 -- A Manly Neutrality - To James Madison, May 13, 1793 -- His Paper Has Saved Our Constitution - Anas, August 2, 1793 -- I Would Have Chosen Them to be Doubtful - Anas, November 18, 28, 1793 -- pt. VII. DEMOCRATIC-REBUBLICAN ; 1794-1801 : -- Introduction -- They Will Triumph Completely - To Tench Coxe, May 1, 1794 -- The Glittering of Crowns and Coronets - To James Madison, December 28, 1794 -- Two Parties Then Do Exist - Notes on Christoph Daniel Ebeling's Letter of July 30, 1795 -- A Burst of Dissatisfaction - To James Monroe, September 6, 1795 -- Their Heads Shorn by the Harlot England - To Phillip Mazzei, April 24, 1796 -- This Has Never Been from Under My Own Lock and Key - To George Washington, June 19, 1796 -- The Only Sure Barrier - To James Madison, January 1, 1797 -- It Could Not Brook Contradiction - To Archibold Stuart, January 4, 1797 -- My Zealous Attachment to the Constitution - Vice Presidential Inaugural Address, March 4, 1797 -- He Returned to His Former Party Views - Anas, March 2 - 6, 1797 -- That There Were an Ocean of Fire Between Us - To Elbridge Gerry, May 13, 1797 -- Against All Popular Storms and Passions - Anas, February 15, 1798 -- Will the Evil Stop There? - To John Taylor, June 1, 1798 -- To Nullify of Their Own Authority - The Kentucky Resolutions, November 1798 -- There, My Friend, Are My Principles - To Elbridge Gerry, January 26, 1799 -- Doing Nothing Which May Hoop Them Together - To Madison November 26, 1799 -- Signs of It Will Be Their Respect for You - To Joseph Priestley, January 27, 1800 -- This Simple and Economical Mode of Government - To Gideon Granger, August 13, 1800 -- I Have Sworn upon the Alter of God ... - To Dr. Benjamin Rush, September 23, 1800 -- I Avoid Giving Any answer - Anas, April 15, 1806 -- I Will Give to That Will a Faithful Execution - Reply to Notification of Election, February 20, 1801 -- Pt. VII. PRESIDENT : 1801 - 1809 : -- Introduction -- We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists - First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1801 -- The Band Is Removed - To John Dickinson, March 6, 1801 -- Sentiments Worthy of Former Times - To Thomas Paine, March 18, 1801 -- The Barbarians Really Flattened Themselves - To Joseph Priestley, March 21, 1801 -- The Storm Is Over, and We Are in Port - To Samuel Adams, March 29, 1801 -- Their Total Exclusion Calls for Prompter Corrections - To a Committee of the Merchants of New Haven, July 12, 1801 -- I Have Begun the Reduction of What Was Deemed Necessary - First Annual Message to Congress, December 8, 1801 -- A Haven for the Oppressed - To Mazzei, December 30, 1801 -- To Restore to Man All His Natural Rights - Reply to a Committee of the Danbury, Connecticut Baptist Association, January 11, 1802 -- From That Moment We Must Marry Ourselves to the British Fleet and Nation - To Robert R. Livingston, April 18, 1802 -- Even to the Western Ocean - Confidential Message to Congress on a Western Exploring Expedition, January 18, 1803 -- Love, Charity, Peace - To Dr. Benjamin Rush, April 21, 1803 -- Let Us Receive Them - Article on Conciliation with the Federalists, June 1, 1803 -- I Prefer That Which Is Safe and Precise - To Wilson C. Nicholas, September 7, 1803 -- The Property and Sovereignty of All Louisiana - Third Annual Message, October 17, 1803 -- All Are Perfectly Equal - Rules of Etiquette in Washington, November [7], 1803 -- Morality Listens to This - To Jean Baptiste Say, February 1, 1804 -- Proofs of My Great Respect for You - To Mrs. John Adams, September 11, 1804 -- The Disposition to Be Just - To William Burwell, January 28, 1805 -- Facts Are Piercing Through - Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805 -- New Principles Have Been Interloped into the Law of Nations - Fifth Annual Message, December 3, 1805 -- You Must Not Commit Yourself to Him - To James Monroe, May 4, 1806 -- The Articles of Public Care - Sixth Annual Message, December 2, 1806 -- To Depart from the Same - Chesapeake Proclamation, July 2, 1807 -- These Aggravations - Seventh Annual Message, October 27, 1807 -- The Principles of Humanity - To Messrs. Thomas, Ellicot, et al., November 13, 1807 -- To Do No Act Which Shall Impair that Principle - To The Representatives of The New Jersey Legislature, December 10, 1807 -- The Manufacturer and Husbandman Side by Side - To The Society of Tammany, or Columbian Order No. 1, of the City of New York, February 29, 1808 -- A Crop of Sudden and Rank Growth - to Gallatin, August 16, 1808 -- The Moderation and Firmness Which Govern Our Councils - Eighth Annual Message, November 8, 1808 -- We Have Suffered Some Loss - Reply to Taber Fitch, November 21, 1808 -- Get by Them As You Would by an Angry Bull - To Thomas Jefferson Randolph, November 24, 1808 -- You Will Unite Yourselves with Us - To Captain Hendrick, The Delawares, Mohlcans, and Munries, [n.d.] -- On an Equal Footing - To M. Henri Gregoire, Eveque et Senateur a Paris, February 25, 1809 -- The Hermit of Monticello - To M. Du Pont de Nemours, March 2, 1809 --"@en ;
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    schema:name "Presidents"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1204155> # United States.
    a schema:Place ;
    schema:name "United States." ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/29636949> # Albert Fried
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Fried" ;
    schema:givenName "Albert" ;
    schema:name "Albert Fried" ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/41866059> # Thomas Jefferson
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:birthDate "1743" ;
    schema:deathDate "1826" ;
    schema:familyName "Jefferson" ;
    schema:givenName "Thomas" ;
    schema:name "Thomas Jefferson" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

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