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Ethics and theology after the Holocaust

Author: Didier Pollefeyt
Publisher: Leuven : Peeters, 2018. ©2018
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The Holocaust casts a heavy shadow over the twenty-first century. The Nazi extermination camps radically call into question the very foundations of Christianity, modernity and the postmodern world. This book challenges and critically reconstructs ethics and theology by bearing witness to the victims, as well as shining a light on the perpetrators and bystanders, thus providing the basis for a renewed Christian  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Didier Pollefeyt
ISBN: 9789042937505 9042937505
OCLC Number: 1059556259
Description: 426 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: Section one: Introduction. Post-Holocaust ethics and theology: A Catholic perspective --
Post-Holocaust ethics and theology: A non-insider perspective --
Section two: Perpetrators. The perpetrator: Devil, machine or idealist? Ethical interpretation of the Holocaust. I. Diabolisation --
II. The anonymity of the torture machine --
III. The enthusiasm of the perpetrator --
IV. Conclusion: Ethics after Auschwitz --
The morality of Auschwitz?. I. Ethics and morality: A critique of modern ethics --
The Nazi ethic --
A critique of Peter Haas' position --
Section three: Victims. The banality of the good: What can we learn from the victim on the Holocaust?. I. Animals and heroes --
II. Choiceless choice --
III. Camp ethics --
IV. Everyday goodness --
V. Beyond self-preservation --
VI. The body matters --
Section four: Jewish responses: Ethics. To love the Torah more than God. Emmanuel Levinas' Jewish thought. I. Levinas and the Holocaust --
II. Il y a: Philosophical translation of the Holocaust experience --
III. The unbearable weight of human hypostasis --
IV. The power of powerlessness --
V. Trauma and God --
The encounter of Athens and Jerusalem in Auschwitz. Emil L. Fackenheim's Jewish thought. I. Totalitarian thought under critique --
II. A philosophy of difference --
III. Philosophy and trauma --
IV. God and ethics --
V. The terror of ethics? --
Section five: Sociological and anthropological responses. Is modernity to blame for the Holocaust --
Auschwitz or how good people can do evil: An ethical interpretation of the perpetrators and the victims of the Holocaust in light of the French thinker Tzvetan Todorov. I. Introduction --
II. Human or inhuman character of the perpetrators? --
III. Are we wolves to each other (Hobbes) or are we each other's keepers (Genesis)? about the victims of the Holocaust --
IV. Conclusion --
Section six: Christian responses: Forgiveness and reconciliation?. Ethics and the unforgivable after Auschwitz. I. First paradigm: Diabolisation- The evildoer as diabolical figure, and the return of vengeance --
II. Second paradigm: Banalisation- The evildoer trivialized and the inculpability of evil --
III. Third paradigm: Ethicisation- The evildoer ethicised and the apology of evil --
IV. Beyond horror and excuse: The evildoer as self-deceiver and the meaning of forgiveness --
V. A post-Holocaust interpretation of the conception of 'unforgivable' --
VI. Conclusion --
Forgiveness after the Holocaust. I. The problem of giving forgiveness --
II. The problem of refusing forgiveness --
III. Moral anger and justice as appropriate reactions to evil --
VI. Victimism --
V. Remembering for the future --
VI. Forgiveness as a free act --
VII. The unforgiveable --
VIII. Forgiveness and reconciliation --
IX. To forgive oneself --
X. Substitute forgiveness --
XI. Intergenerational bonds and loyalty --
XII. Forgiveness between already and not yet --
XIII. Forgiveness and reconciliation as eschatological restitution --
XIV. Theological paradox --
Section seven: God. Eclipsing God. I. Religion without theodicy --
II. Manichaeism versus monotheism --
III. Evil as privatio boni --
IV. Evil as perversio boni --
V. Perversio dei --
VI. Otherwise than being --
Section eight: Christ. Christology after Auschwitz. I. Jews, Christians, and the crucified Christ --
II. Auschwitz as the end of Christological triumphalism --
III. Christologies of continuity --
IV. One covenant and two covenant theories --
V. Continuity and discontinuity --
VI. Moltmann's Christology --
VII. Constitutive and representative understandings of Jesus as saviour --
VIII. Christ past and present --
IX. The weeping Messiah --
The Holocaust as irrevocable turning point in Jewish-Christian relations. Section nine: Interreligious dialogue. The other is not the same: Interreligious dialogue as hermeneutic power of encounter. I. Exclusivism --
II. Inclusivism --
III. Pluralism --
IV. Particularism --
V. Hermeneutics --
Section ten: Bible. Texts of terror: Post-Holocaust biblical hermenteutics. I. The text NRSV --
II. Setting the problem --
III. Contextualisation --
IV. Various strategies to deal with the passage --
V. Revelation in Pauline texts: God writes straight on crooked lines --
Section eleven: Nature. A post-Holocaust theology of creation. I. The face of nature? --
II. Towards a hermeneutics of nature --
III. Man: Lord and master over nature? --
IV. Nature as a meeting place with the other --
V. The miracle of nature? --
VI. The Messianic creative assignment of man --
VII. The difference between man and animal --
VIII. Plea for an ethically qualified anthropocentrism --
IX. Against the Nazi deification of nature --
X. A Catholic re-appreciation of nature after Auschwitz --
Section twelve: Holocaust education. Overcoming Holocaust fatigue in the classroom. I. Four explanations of Holocaust fatigue --
II. Beyond Holocaust fatigue --
Comparing the incomparable: On the use of the Holocaust as an analogy in contemporary social issues and education. I. Paradigms of Holocaust education
Responsibility: Didier Pollefeyt.

Abstract:

The Holocaust casts a heavy shadow over the twenty-first century. The Nazi extermination camps radically call into question the very foundations of Christianity, modernity and the postmodern world. This book challenges and critically reconstructs ethics and theology by bearing witness to the victims, as well as shining a light on the perpetrators and bystanders, thus providing the basis for a renewed Christian understanding of good and evil for our time. The result is a comprehensive and interdisciplinary post-Holocaust ethics and theology, charting questions at the heart of a new synthesis: our concepts of God, the human person and the (post)modern world, as well as our understanding of ecology, politics, education, sacred texts, Christology, interreligious dialogue, forgiveness and reconciliation and eschatology. The central idea running through the twenty-one chapters of this volume is that the commandment "not to grand posthumous victories to Hitler" is an ongoing and often demanding task that calls for complexity, compassion and renewed commitment to transcendence in all and everything.

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The banality of the good: What can we learn from the victim on the Holocaust?. I. Animals and heroes -- II. Choiceless choice -- III. Camp ethics -- IV. Everyday goodness -- V. Beyond self-preservation -- VI. The body matters -- Section four: Jewish responses: Ethics. To love the Torah more than God. Emmanuel Levinas\' Jewish thought. I. Levinas and the Holocaust -- II. Il y a: Philosophical translation of the Holocaust experience -- III. The unbearable weight of human hypostasis -- IV. The power of powerlessness -- V. Trauma and God -- The encounter of Athens and Jerusalem in Auschwitz. Emil L. Fackenheim\'s Jewish thought. I. Totalitarian thought under critique -- II. A philosophy of difference -- III. Philosophy and trauma -- IV. God and ethics -- V. The terror of ethics? -- Section five: Sociological and anthropological responses. Is modernity to blame for the Holocaust -- Auschwitz or how good people can do evil: An ethical interpretation of the perpetrators and the victims of the Holocaust in light of the French thinker Tzvetan Todorov. I. Introduction -- II. Human or inhuman character of the perpetrators? -- III. Are we wolves to each other (Hobbes) or are we each other\'s keepers (Genesis)? about the victims of the Holocaust -- IV. Conclusion -- Section six: Christian responses: Forgiveness and reconciliation?. Ethics and the unforgivable after Auschwitz. I. First paradigm: Diabolisation- The evildoer as diabolical figure, and the return of vengeance -- II. Second paradigm: Banalisation- The evildoer trivialized and the inculpability of evil -- III. Third paradigm: Ethicisation- The evildoer ethicised and the apology of evil -- IV. Beyond horror and excuse: The evildoer as self-deceiver and the meaning of forgiveness -- V. A post-Holocaust interpretation of the conception of \'unforgivable\' -- VI. 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