skip to content
Ethnic differences in demographic behavior in the United States : what can we learn from vital statistics about inequality? Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Ethnic differences in demographic behavior in the United States : what can we learn from vital statistics about inequality?

Author: Michael R Haines; National Bureau of Economic Research,
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, 2017.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 23827.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This paper looks at the fertility and mortality experience of racial and ethnic groups in the United States from the early 20th century to the present. The first part consist of a description and critique of the racial and ethnic categories used in the federal census and in the published vital statistics. The second part looks at these two dimensions of demographic behavior. There has been both absolute and relative  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Michael R Haines; National Bureau of Economic Research,
OCLC Number: 1004234977
Notes: "September 2017"
Description: 1 online resource (18 pages, 46 unnumbered pages) : illustrations.
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 23827.
Responsibility: Michael R. Haines.

Abstract:

This paper looks at the fertility and mortality experience of racial and ethnic groups in the United States from the early 20th century to the present. The first part consist of a description and critique of the racial and ethnic categories used in the federal census and in the published vital statistics. The second part looks at these two dimensions of demographic behavior. There has been both absolute and relative convergence of fertility across groups. It has been of relatively recent origin and has been due, in large part, to stable birth rates for the majority white population combined with declining birth rates for blacks and the Asian-origin, Hispanic-origin, and American Indian populations. This has not been true for mortality. The black population has experienced absolute convergence but relative deterioration in mortality (neonatal and infant mortality, maternal mortality, expectation of life at birth, and age-adjusted death rates), in contrast to the American Indian and Asian-origin populations. The Asian-origin population actually now has age-adjusted death rates significantly lower than those for the white population. The disadvantaged condition of the black population and the deteriorating social safety net are the likely origins of this outcome. This is a clear indication of relative inequality, as the black population is not sharing as much in the mortality improvements in recent decades.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1004234977> # Ethnic differences in demographic behavior in the United States : what can we learn from vital statistics about inequality?
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book, schema:MediaObject ;
    library:oclcnum "1004234977" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/mau> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/equality> ; # Equality
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/mortality_united_states_history> ; # Mortality--United States--History
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Place/united_states> ; # United States.
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/demography_united_states_history> ; # Demography--United States--History
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/equality_united_states_history> ; # Equality--United States--History
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/mortality> ; # Mortality
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/fertility_human> ; # Fertility, Human
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/demography> ; # Demography
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/fertility_human_united_states_history> ; # Fertility, Human--United States--History
    schema:author <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Person/haines_michael_r> ; # Michael R. Haines
    schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
    schema:datePublished "2017" ;
    schema:description "This paper looks at the fertility and mortality experience of racial and ethnic groups in the United States from the early 20th century to the present. The first part consist of a description and critique of the racial and ethnic categories used in the federal census and in the published vital statistics. The second part looks at these two dimensions of demographic behavior. There has been both absolute and relative convergence of fertility across groups. It has been of relatively recent origin and has been due, in large part, to stable birth rates for the majority white population combined with declining birth rates for blacks and the Asian-origin, Hispanic-origin, and American Indian populations. This has not been true for mortality. The black population has experienced absolute convergence but relative deterioration in mortality (neonatal and infant mortality, maternal mortality, expectation of life at birth, and age-adjusted death rates), in contrast to the American Indian and Asian-origin populations. The Asian-origin population actually now has age-adjusted death rates significantly lower than those for the white population. The disadvantaged condition of the black population and the deteriorating social safety net are the likely origins of this outcome. This is a clear indication of relative inequality, as the black population is not sharing as much in the mortality improvements in recent decades."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/4514922393> ;
    schema:genre "History"@en ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Series/working_paper_series_national_bureau_of_economic_research> ; # Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Series/nber_working_paper_series> ; # NBER working paper series ;
    schema:name "Ethnic differences in demographic behavior in the United States : what can we learn from vital statistics about inequality?"@en ;
    schema:productID "1004234977" ;
    schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Organization/national_bureau_of_economic_research> ; # National Bureau of Economic Research,
    schema:url <http://www.nber.org/papers/w23827> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1004234977> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Organization/national_bureau_of_economic_research> # National Bureau of Economic Research,
    a schema:Organization ;
    schema:name "National Bureau of Economic Research," ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Person/haines_michael_r> # Michael R. Haines
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Haines" ;
    schema:givenName "Michael R." ;
    schema:name "Michael R. Haines" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Place/united_states> # United States.
    a schema:Place ;
    schema:name "United States." ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Series/nber_working_paper_series> # NBER working paper series ;
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1004234977> ; # Ethnic differences in demographic behavior in the United States : what can we learn from vital statistics about inequality?
    schema:name "NBER working paper series ;" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Series/working_paper_series_national_bureau_of_economic_research> # Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1004234977> ; # Ethnic differences in demographic behavior in the United States : what can we learn from vital statistics about inequality?
    schema:name "Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/demography_united_states_history> # Demography--United States--History
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Demography--United States--History"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/equality_united_states_history> # Equality--United States--History
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Equality--United States--History"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/fertility_human_united_states_history> # Fertility, Human--United States--History
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Fertility, Human--United States--History"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4514922393#Topic/mortality_united_states_history> # Mortality--United States--History
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Mortality--United States--History"@en ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1004234977>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
    schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1004234977> ; # Ethnic differences in demographic behavior in the United States : what can we learn from vital statistics about inequality?
    schema:dateModified "2019-02-13" ;
    void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/WorldCat> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.