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Events, States and Times : An essay on narrative discourse in English

Author: Daniel Altshuler
Publisher: Warsaw ; Berlin : Sciendo, [2016] ©2016
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : Government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This monograph investigates the temporal interpretation of narrative discourse in two parts. The theme of the first part is narrative progression. It begins with a case study of the adverb ‘now’ and its interaction with the meaning of tense. The case study motivates an ontological distinction between events, states and times and proposes that ‘now’ seeks a prominent state that holds throughout the time described by  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Daniel Altshuler
ISBN: 9783110485912 3110485915
OCLC Number: 1054870281
Language Note: In English.
Description: 1 online resource (186 p.)
Contents: Frontmatter --
Contents --
Acknowledgments --
Part I: Narrative progression: From discourse connectivity to event partitivity --
1. Preliminary thoughts: Narrative discourse --
2. Prominence: A look at ‘now’ --
3. Coherence: A look at NARRATION and RESULT --
Appendices --
Part II: Semantics and pragmatics of tense: The nuts and bolts --
4. Cessation and double access --
5. Sequence of tense --
6. Concluding thoughts: Ways of composing with viewpoint aspect --
Bibliography
Responsibility: Daniel Altshuler.
More information:

Abstract:

This monograph investigates the temporal interpretation of narrative discourse in two parts. The theme of the first part is narrative progression. It begins with a case study of the adverb ‘now’ and its interaction with the meaning of tense. The case study motivates an ontological distinction between events, states and times and proposes that ‘now’ seeks a prominent state that holds throughout the time described by the tense. Building on prior research, prominence is shown to be influenced by principles of discourse coherence and two coherence principles, NARRATION and RESULT, are given a formally explicit characterization. The key innovation is a new method for testing the definitional adequacy of NARRATION and RESULT, namely by an abductive argument. This contribution opens a new way of thinking about how eventive and stative descriptions contribute to the perceived narrative progression in a discourse. The theme of the second part of the monograph is the semantics and pragmatics of tense. A key innovation is that the present and past tenses are treated as scalar alternatives, a view that is motivated by adopting a particular hypothesis concerning stative predication. The proposed analysis accounts for tense in both matrix clauses and in complements of propositional attitudes, where the notorious double access reading arises. This reading is explored as part of a corpus study that provides a glimpse of how tense semantics interacts with Gricean principles and at-issueness. Several cross-linguistic predictions of the analysis are considered, including their consequences for the Sequence of Tense phenomenon and the Upper Limit Constraint. Finally, a hypothesis is provided about how tense meanings compose with temporal adverbs and verb phrases. Two influential analysis of viewpoint aspect are then compared in light of the hypothesis. The monograph is directed at graduate students and researchers in semantics, pragmatics and philosophy of language. The analysis of narrative discourse that is developed in the monograph synthesizes and builds on prior collaborative research with Corien Bary, Valentine Hacquard, Thomas Roberts, Roger Schwarzschild, Una Stojnić, Károly Varasdi and Aaron White. Daniel Altshuler is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the School of Cognitive Science, Hampshire College and an Adjunct Professor of Linguistics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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