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The evolution and extinction of the dinosaurs

Author: David E Fastovsky; David B Weishampel
Publisher: New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 2nd ed. reprintView all editions and formats
Summary:
From the Publisher: "This new edition of The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs is a unique, comprehensive treatment of a fascinating group of organisms. It is a detailed survey of dinosaur origins, their diversity, and their eventual extinction." "The book is written as a series of essays covering important and timely topics in dinosaur paleontology and natural history. It will appeal to non-specialists and  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David E Fastovsky; David B Weishampel
OCLC Number: 263921668
Notes: Originally published, 1996, reprinted 2001; Second edition 2005, reprint 2007.
Description: x, 485 pages : illustrations, maps ; 27 cm
Contents: Preface to the second edition --
Part 1: Setting The Stage --
1: Introduction --
Fossils --
Taphonomy --
Collection --
Prospecting --
Collecting --
Back at the ranch --
Important readings --
2: Back to the past: the Mesozoic Era --
When did the dinosaurs live and how do we know? --
Chronostratigraphy --
Age of rocks --
Lithostratigraphy --
Biostratigraphy --
Eras and periods and epochs, oh my! --
Growth of a prehistoric timescale --
Where were the continents during the time of the dinosaurs? --
What were climates like during the time of the dinosaurs? --
Potential effects of plate motions on climate --
Climates through the Mesozoic --
Box 2-1: Stable isotopes, ancient temperatures, and dead oceans --
Important readings --
Appendix: Chemistry quick 'n dirty --
3: Discovery order in the natural world --
Hierarchy --
Characters --
Cladograms --
Monkey's uncle --
Evolution --
Chopping down the "tree of life" --
Using cladograms to reconstruct phylogeny --
Box 3-1: Wristwatches: when is a watch a watch? --
Parsimony --
Science and testing hypotheses --
Important readings --
4: Interrelationship of vertebrates --
In the beginning --
Jumping to chordates --
Box 4-1: Body plans --
Vertebrata --
Gnathostomata --
Box 4-2: Biological classification: what's in a name? --
Tetrapoda --
Tetrapod skeleton made easy --
Box 4-3: Fish and chips --
Amniota --
Synapsida --
Reptilia --
Anapsida --
Diapsida --
Archosauromorpha --
Dinosaurs --
Box 4-4: Stance: it's both who you are and what you do --
Important readings --
5: Origin of the dinosauria --
History of the dinosauria --
Dinosaurs divided --
Dinosaurs united --
Dinosaurian monophyly --
Origins --
Rise of dinosaurs: superiority or luck? --
Important readings --
Part 2: Ornithischia: Armored, Horned, And Duck-Billed Dinosaurs --
Important readings --
6: Stegosauria: hot plates --
Stegosaur lives and lifestyles --
Stance and gait --
Dealing with mealing --
Brains --
Box 6-1: Poetry of dinosaurs --
Social lives of the enigmatic --
Plates and spines --
Evolution of Stegosauria --
Stegosaurs meet history: a short account of their discovery --
Box 6-2: Nineteenth century dinosaur wars: boxer versus puncher --
Important readings --
7: Ankylosauria: mass and gas --
Ankylosaur lives and lifestyles --
Going their way --
Food and mouths to feed --
Defensive moves --
Evolution moves --
Evolution of Ankylosauria --
Ankylosaurs meet history: a short account of their discovery --
Box 7-1: Indiana Jones and the Central Asiatic Expeditions of the American Museum of Natural History --
Important readings --
8: Pachycephalosauria: ramrods of the Cretaceous --
Pachycephalosaur lives and lifestyles --
Feeding --
Thoughts of a pachycephalosaur --
Social behavior --
Sexual selection --
Evolution of pachycephalosauria --
Pachycephalosaurs meet history: a short account of their discovery --
Important readings --
9: Ceratopsia: horns and all the frills --
Ceratopsian lives and lifestyles --
Feeding --
Locomotion --
Horns, frills, and ceratopsian behavior --
Evolution of ceratopsia --
Ceratopsidae --
Ceratopsians meet history: a short account of their discovery --
Important readings --
10: Ornithopoda: the tuskers, antelopes, and "mighty ducks" of the Mesozoic --
Ornithopod lives and lifestyles --
Going their way --
Box 10-1: Hypotheses that didn't go the distance --
Feeding and food --
Social behavior --
Evolution of Ornithopoda --
Heterodontosauridae --
Euornithopoda --
Iguanodontia --
Hadrosauridae --
Ornithopods meet history: a short account of their discovery --
Important readings --
Part 3: Saurischia: Predators And Giants --
Important readings. 11: Sauropodomorpha: the big, the bizarre, and the majestic --
Lifestyles of the huge and ancient --
Box 11-1: Tendaguru! --
Feeding --
Locomotion --
Social behavior --
Sauropodomorph growth and development --
Evolution of Sauropodomorpha --
Prosauropoda --
Sauropoda --
Diplodocoidea --
11-2: Decapitation of "Brontosaurus" --
Macronaria --
Titanosauria --
Sauropodomorphs meet history: a short account of their discovery --
Important readings --
12: Theropoda I: nature red in tooth and claw --
Theropod lives and lifestyles --
Going their ways --
Theropods as living organisms --
Weaponry --
Jaws and teeth --
12-1: Triceratops as spoils-or spoiled Triceratops? --
Senses --
Prey --
Social behavior-sex and the Rex --
Evolution of Theropoda --
Ceratosauria --
Tetanurae --
Coelurosauria --
Eumaniraptora --
Theropods meet history: a short account of their discovery --
Important readings --
13: Theropoda II: the origin of birds --
Living birds --
Archaeopteryx lithographica and the ancestry of living birds --
Anatomy of Archaeopteryx --
Ancestry of living birds --
Living birds as dinosaurs --
Pneumatic bones and feathers: adaptation versus inheritance --
Revolution of the 1990s: feathered dinosaurs --
Origin of feathers --
Liaoning fossils --
What, if anything, is a bird? --
Dissent --
Box 13-1: Plus ca change --
Flight --
Conclusions --
Important readings --
14: Theropoda III: the early evolution of birds --
Mesozoic avialary --
Getting to be a modern bird --
Important readings --
Part 4: Endothermy, Environments, And Extinction --
15: Dinosaur thermoregulation: some like it hot --
Enigma explored --
15-1: Warm-bloodedness: to have and have not --
Is warm-bloodedness superior to cold-bloodedness? --
Temperature regulation among vertebrates --
Endothermic and ectothermic metabolism --
Box 15-2: Primer on metabolism --
Dinosaur endothermy: the evidence --
Anatomy --
Box 15-3: In the tracks of the dinosaurs --
Box 15-4: Dinosaur smarts --
Histology --
Ecology --
Box 15-5: Weighing in --
Zoogeography --
Phylogeny --
Geochemistry --
Opinions on dinosaurs endothermy --
Modern views on dinosaur metabolism --
Important readings --
16: Patterns in dinosaur evolution --
Box 16-1: Shape of tetrapod diversity --
Box 16-2: Counting dinosaurs --
Dinosaurs through time --
Late Triassic (227-205 Ma) --
Early Jurassic (205-190 Ma) --
Middle Jurassic (190-159 Ma) --
Late Jurassic (159-144 Ma) --
Early Cretaceous (144-99 Ma) --
Late Cretaceous (99-65 Ma) --
Out with a whimper or a bang? --
Plants and herbivores --
Plants --
Dinosaur and plant co-evolution --
Box 16-3: Dinosaurs invent flowering plants? --
Carnivorous dinosaurs --
Important readings --
17: Reconstructing extinctions: the art of science --
Extinctions --
Resolving the past --
Resolution: the "R word" --
Higher taxa --
Box 17-1: Full disclosure: the ugly truth about higher taxa --
Important readings --
18: Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction: the frill is gone --
Geological record of the latest Cretaceous --
Earth gets a makeover --
Asteroid impact --
Biological record of the latest Cretaceous --
Oceans --
Terrestrial record --
Box 18-1: Dinosaurs and mass extinctions --
Extinction hypotheses --
Adhering to a scientific standard --
Extinction hypotheses --
Box 18-2: Real reason dinosaurs became extinct --
Recovery --
Toward a consensus? --
Important readings --
Glossary --
Subject index --
Generic index --
Author index.
Other Titles: Evolution & extinction of the dinosaurs
Dinosaurs
Responsibility: David E. Fastovsky, David B. Weishampel.
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Abstract:

This is a comprehensive 2005 student textbook on dinosaurs that non-specialists will also find fascinating. It is the only comprehensive text that takes an explicitly phylogenetic approach to  Read more...

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From reviews of the previous edition: 'The book amply fulfils its objective of providing an authoritative, stimulating and lively introduction to dinosaurs. There are not many textbooks to which the Read more...

 
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