Exposures to molds in school classrooms of children with asthma. (Downloadable article, 2013) [WorldCat.org]
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Exposures to molds in school classrooms of children with asthma.

Author: Sachin N BaxiMichael L MuilenbergChristine A RogersWilliam J SheehanJonathan GaffinAll authors
Publisher: [Oxford] : John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2013.
Edition/Format:   Downloadable article : Document   Computer File : English
Publication:Pediatric allergy and immunology
Summary:
Abstract Background Students spend a large portion of their day in classrooms which may be a source of mold exposure. We examined the diversity and concentrations of molds in inner-city schools and described differences between classrooms within the same school. Methods Classroom airborne mold spores, collected over a 2 day period, were measured twice during the school year by direct microscopy. Results There were  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document
Document Type: Article, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Sachin N Baxi; Michael L Muilenberg; Christine A Rogers; William J Sheehan; Jonathan Gaffin; Perdita Permaul; Lianne S Kopel; Peggy S Lai; Jeffrey P Lane; Ann Bailey; Carter R Petty; Chunxia Fu; Diane R Gold; Wanda Phipatanakul
ISSN:0905-6157
OCLC Number: 1016968730
Notes: In: Pediatric allergy and immunology, Vol. 24, no. 7 (2013), p.697-703.
Description: 1 online resource

Abstract:

Abstract Background Students spend a large portion of their day in classrooms which may be a source of mold exposure. We examined the diversity and concentrations of molds in inner-city schools and described differences between classrooms within the same school. Methods Classroom airborne mold spores, collected over a 2 day period, were measured twice during the school year by direct microscopy. Results There were 180 classroom air samples collected from 12 schools. Mold was present in 100% of classrooms. Classrooms within the same school had differing mold levels and mold diversity scores. The total mold per classroom was 176.6 ± 4.2 spores/m3 (geometric mean ± standard deviation) and ranged from 11.2 to 16, 288.5 spores/m3. Mold diversity scores for classroom samples ranged from 1 to 19 (7.7 ± 3.5). The classroom accounted for the majority of variance (62%) in the total mold count, and for the majority of variance (56%) in the mold diversity score versus the school. The species with the highest concentrations and found most commonly included Cladosporium (29.3 ± 4.2 spores/m3), Penicillium/Aspergillus (15.0 ± 5.4 spores/m3), smut spores (12.6 ± 4.0 spores/m3), and basidiospores (6.6 ± 7.1 spores/m3). Conclusions Our study found that the school is a source of mold exposure, but particularly the classroom microenvironment varies in quantity of spores and species among classrooms within the same school. We also verified that visible mold may be a predictor for higher mold spore counts. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of mold exposure relative to asthma morbidity in sensitized and non-sensitized asthmatic children.

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