Five to ten : story of a hidden child (Book, 1999) [WorldCat.org]
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Five to ten : story of a hidden child

Author: Marcel Braitstein
Publisher: Montreal : Concordia University Chair in Canadian Jewish Studies and the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies, ©1999.
Series: Memoirs of Holocaust survivors in Canada, v. 2.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Memoirs of a Jew born in Antwerp in 1935 as Motl Brajtsztajn. When the Germans bombed Antwerp in May 1940, Braitstein and his parents vainly attempted to flee to France. After his mother's death from illness, he went to live with her parents in Charleroi. In 1942 Braitstein was placed in hiding with a Christian family named Lebeau, and raised as a Christian. After the liberation he was returned to his grandparents;  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Biographies
Personal narratives
Biography
Named Person: Marcel Braitstein; Marcel Braitstein; Marcel Braitstein
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Marcel Braitstein
ISBN: 088947348X 9780889473485 0889473463 9780889473461
OCLC Number: 43010474
Notes: Also available via World Wide Web.
Description: 85 pages ; 28 cm.
Series Title: Memoirs of Holocaust survivors in Canada, v. 2.
Responsibility: by Marcel Braitstein.

Abstract:

Memoirs of a Jew born in Antwerp in 1935 as Motl Brajtsztajn. When the Germans bombed Antwerp in May 1940, Braitstein and his parents vainly attempted to flee to France. After his mother's death from illness, he went to live with her parents in Charleroi. In 1942 Braitstein was placed in hiding with a Christian family named Lebeau, and raised as a Christian. After the liberation he was returned to his grandparents; he had difficulty readjusting to his original name and identity. His father died in Auschwitz. At age 15, he rejected all religion for a Marxist humanism. In 1951 he emigrated with his grandparents to Montreal. He became a sculptor, an engaged artist whose works depict the suffering of all people.

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