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Food process modeling and control : chemical engineering applications

Author: Mustafa Özilgen
Publisher: Amsterdam : Gordon and Breach Science Publishers, ©1998.
Series: Topics in chemical engineering, v. 12.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:

Fundamental techniques of mathematical modelling of processes essential to the food industry are explained in this text. Instead of concentrating on detailed theoretical analysis and mathematical  Read more...

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Genre/Form: Lebensmtitelverfahrenstechnik
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mustafa Özilgen
ISBN: 9056991434 9789056991432 9056991426 9789056991425
OCLC Number: 40098833
Description: xxiii, 518 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Contents: Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 What is process modeling? --
Example 1.1 Death kinetics of microorganisms in dough --
Example 1.2 Kinetics of galactose oxidase production --
Example 1.3 Kinetics of lipid oxidation in foods --
Example 1.4 Analogy between cake filtration and ultrafiltration processes --
References --
ch. 2 Transport phenomena models --
2.1. The general property balance equation --
2.2. Equation of continuity --
Example 2.1 Diffusion of water through a wine barrel during aging --
2.3. Equation of energy --
2.4. Equation of motion --
2.5. Theories for liquid transport coefficients --
i). Eyring's theory of liquid viscosity --
Example 2.2 Kinetic compensation relations for the viscosity of fruit juices --
ii). Thermal conductivity of liquids --
iii). Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in liquids --
iv). Eyring's theory of liquid diffusion --
Example 2.3 Temperature effects on diffusivity of water in starch. Note continued: Example 2.4 Compensation relations for diffusivity of water in starch --
2.6. Analytical solutions to ordinary differential equations --
Example 2.5 Characterization of a differential equation --
Example 2.6 Heat transfer in a continuous plug flow sterilization reactor --
Example 2.7 Diffusion of the modified atmosphere gas mixtures through a polymer film --
2.7. Transport phenomena models involving partial differential equations --
Example 2.8 Temperature profiles in a steak during frying and in meat analog during cooking --
Example 2.9 Temperature profiles in a spherical potato tuber during blanching --
Example 2.10 Temperature profiles in a sausage during cooking --
Example 2.11 Determination of the temperature profile in a spherical potato tuber by using the generalized Bessel's equation --
Example 2.12 Liquid diffusion model for drying rough rice --
Example 2.13 Salting of semi-hard ripened cheese. Note continued: 2.8. Chart solutions to unsteady state conduction problems --
Example 2.14 Estimation of processing time and local temperatures during thermal processing of a conduction heating food by using charts --
2.9. Interfacial mass transfer --
2.10. Correlations for parameters of the transport equations --
i). Density of dried vegetables --
ii). Specific heat --
iii). Thermal conductivity of meat --
iv). Viscosity of microbial suspensions --
v). Moisture diffusivity in granular starch --
vi). Convective heat transfer coefficients during heat transfer to canned foods in steritort --
vii). Mass transfer coefficient k for oxygen transfer in fermenters --
Example 2.15 Drying behavior of frozen beef --
Example 2.16 Theoretical expressions for interfacial mass transfer coefficients --
2.11. Rheological modeling --
Example 2.17 Rheological behavior of the orange juice concentrate --
Example 2.18 Rheological aspects of extrusion processes. Note continued: Example 2.19 Maxwell, Kevin-Voigt and Burgers models of the stress-strain relations --
Example 2.20 Visco-elastic behavior of cheddar cheese and potato flesh --
Example 2.21 Stress relaxation of fruit gels --
2.12. The Engineering Bernoulli equation --
Example 2.22 Shrinkage and whey expulsion in rennet curd --
Example 2.23 Pump power requirement with a Herschel-Bulkley fluid --
2.13. Laplace transformations in mathematical modeling --
Example 2.24 Solution of a linear ordinary differential equation with Laplace transformations --
Example 2.25 Diffusion of salt into semi hard white cheese --
Example 2.26 Temperature profiles in a steak during frying --
2.14. Numerical methods in mathematical modeling --
Example 2.27 Canonical form of a third order non-linear heterogeneous ordinary differential equation --
Example 2.28 Drying behavior of honey-starch mixtures --
Example 2.29 Drying behavior of an apple slice. Note continued: Example 2.30 Temperature profiles along a spherical potato tuber during blanching --
Example 2.31 Temperature profiles along a spherical potato tuber during thermal processing in a can --
References --
ch. 3 Kinetic Modeling --
3.1. Kinetics and Food Processing --
3.2. The Rate Expression --
Example 3.1 Ascorbic acid loss in packaged and non-packaged broccoli --
Example 3.2 Simultaneous nutrient and toxin degradation during thermal processing --
Example 3.3 Shelf life calculation based on nutrient loss --
Example 3.4 Kinetics of nutrient loss with sequential chemical reactions --
3.3. Why do the chemicals react? --
i). Collision Theory --
ii). Transition State Theory --
3.4. Temperature effects on the reaction rates --
Example 3.5 Vitamin loss in a snack food --
Example 3.6 Total amounts of nutrient loss after sequences of a canning process --
3.5. Precision of reaction rate constants and activation energy measurements. Note continued: Example 3.17 Kinetics of the change of texture and taste of potatoes during cooking --
3.9. Microbial kinetics --
Example 3.18 Mixed culture interactions between P. vulgaris and S. cerevisiae --
Example 3.19 Kinetics of microbial growth, gas production and increase in dough volume during leavening --
Example 3.20 Kinetics of microbial growth and lactic acid production by mixed cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus in yogurt production --
Example 3.21 Kinetics of spontaneous wine production --
Example 3.22 Kinetics of Aspergillus oryzae cultivations on starch --
Example 3.23 Dynamic response to perturbations in a chemostat during ethanol production --
3.10. Kinetics of microbial death --
Example 3.24 Kinetic compensation relations for microbial death --
Example 3.25 Relation between the death rate and the Arrhenius expression constants and the D and z values --
Example 3.26 Mechanisms for death of spores. Note continued: Example 3.27 A model for pasteurization with microwaves in a tubular flow reactor --
Example 3.28 Kinetics of ultraviolet inactivation processes --
References --
ch. 4 Mathematical modeling in Food Engineering operations --
4.1. Thermal process modeling --
Example 4.1 Calculation of process time and nutrient loss at a constant temperature --
Example 4.2 Implications of the cooking values --
Example 4.3 Process time calculation with variable time temperature profile --
Example 4.4 Perfect convection model of thermal processing --
Example 4.5 Perfect conduction model of thermal processing --
Example 4.6 Calculation of fn and j values from the physical properties of the food and the use of Ball's formula method for thermal process calculation --
Example 4.7 Use of Ball's formula method with changing can size --
Example 4.8 Wehrle-Merson model to predict critical point temperatures of conduction heating foods for short heating times. Note continued: Example 4.9 Lethality-Fourier number method for process calculation --
Example 4.10 A transfer function approach to predict transient internal temperatures during sterilization --
Example 4.11 Thermal process calculation by using the residence time distribution in a holding tube --
Example 4.12 Use of axially dispersed plug flow model in continuous thermal process calculations --
Example 4.13 Continuous processing of liquid foods containing particles --
4.2. Mathematical modeling of evaporation processes --
Example 4.14 Basic calculations for a single effect tomato paste concentration process --
Example 4.15 Basic calculations for a double effect tomato paste concentration process --
Example 4.16 Computer simulation of the dynamic behavior in a rotary steam-coil vacuum evaporator during concentration of tomato paste --
Example 4.17 Modeling the operation of the multiple effect evaporators used in the sugar industry. Note continued: 4.3. Mathematical modeling of crystallization processes --
Example 4.18 Critical embryo size for stable ice nucleation --
Example 4.19 Kinetics of homogeneous ice nucleation --
Example 4.20 Kinetics of heterogeneous ice nucleation --
Example 4.21 Modeling crystal growth with combined solute diffusion and surface reaction --
Example 4.22 Kinetics of potassium bitartarate crystallization from wines --
Example 4.23 Nucleation and growth kinetics of lactose --
Example 4.24 Kinetics of recrystallization of ice in frozen beef tissue --
Example 4.25 Kinetics of recrystallization of ice during ripening in freeze concentration --
4.4. Freezing time calculations --
Example 4.26 Freezing time calculations with Plank's equation --
Example 4.27 Cleland and Earle's model to predict heating and cooling rates of solids including those with irregular shapes --
Example 4.28 Cleland and Earle's simplified model for prediction of the freezing times. Note continued: Example 4.29 Mathematical model for nonsymmetric freezing of beef --
Example 4.30 Prediction of freezing times with an enthalpy-based numerical method --
4.5. Mathematical modeling of drying and frying processes --
i). The basic model of drying --
ii). Hallstrom and co-worker's regular regime model --
iii). Shrinking-core model --
Example 4.31 Expressions for the diffusivity of moisture in pasta and bakery products --
Example 4.32 Modeling simultaneous heat and mass transfer in foods with dimensional changes and variable transport parameters --
Example 4.33 Drying behavior of thin biscuits during baking process --
Example 4.34 Modeling heat and mass transfer to cookies undergoing commercial baking --
Example 4.35 Modeling of wheat drying in fluidized beds --
Example 4.36 Heat and mass transfer in freeze drying --
Example 4.37 Heat and mass transport in convection oven frying --
Example 4.38 Heat and mass transport in immersion-fat frying. Note continued: Example 4.39 Mass transfer in mixed solute osmotic dehydration of apple rings --
4.6. Mathematical modeling of filtration and membrane separation processes --
Example 4.40 Constant pressure filtration process of poultry chiller water --
Example 4.41 Effect of the tube diameter on the ultrafiltration rates of apple juice in a process utilizing single pass metallic ultrafiltration tubes --
Example 4.42 Unsteady-state permeate flux of crossflow microfiltration --
Example 4.43 A model for decreasing flux via gel and cake formation and membrane fouling in cheese whey ultrafiltration --
4.7. Mathematical modeling of extraction processes --
Example 4.44 Extraction of sugar from beets --
Example 4.45 Countercurrent desalting of pickles --
Example 4.46 Chart solution to unsteady state leaching problems with negligible external mass transfer resistance --
Example 4.47 Mathematical modeling of blanching potatoes. Note continued: Example 4.48 Fractionation of citrus oils by using a membrane based extraction process --
Example 4.49 Supercritical extraction of fish oils --
Example 4.50 Continuous supercritical carbon dioxide processing of anhydrous milk fat in a packed column --
4.8. Mathematical analysis of the processes for distilled beverage production --
Example 4.51 Analysis of whiskey production in a pot still --
Example 4.52 Distillation column design with McCabe and Thiele method for separation of ethanol from a fermentation product --
Example 4.53 Estimation of the tray number for maximum accumulation of congeners during brandy production --
References --
ch. 5 Statistical process analysis and quality control --
5.1. Statistical quality control --
Example 5.1 Stagewise quality control in winemaking --
5.2. Statistical process analysis --
Example 5.2 Cell size distribution in corn extrudates. Note continued: Example 5.3 Residence time distribution in non-Newtonian flow during thermal processing --
Example 5.4 Probability of having more than a limiting weight of contents in a randomly selected can --
Example 5.5 Probability of having a certain fraction of loss in fruit packing --
Example 5.6 Fraction of the total production falling between given limits --
Example 5.7 The maximum tolerable standard deviation --
Example 5.8 Probability of having a sample mean smaller than a given value --
Example 5.9 Use of the standard normal variable due to the similarity of the normal, Poisson and Gaussian distribution curves --
Example 5.10 Statistical properties of broiler feeds and their raw materials --
Example 5.11 Estimation of the population mean and variance from those of the additive contributing factors --
Example 5.12 Estimate of the population mean and variance from food formulation, and those of the contributing factors. Note continued: Example 5.13 Additive property of population means and variances --
Example 5.14 Dependence of the confidence limits on the sample size --
Example 5.15 Hypothesis testing concerning one mean when the population standard deviation is known --
Example 5.16 Hypothesis testing concerning two means when the population standard deviations are known --
Example 5.17 Hypothesis testing concerning one and two means when the population standard deviations are not known --
Example 5.18 Effect of the probability level on the results of the hypothesis testing --
Example 5.19 Confidence limits with binomial distribution --
Example 5.20 Confidence limits with Poisson distribution --
Example 5.21 Testing the validity of normal distribution assumption --
Example 5.22 Confidence limits associated with triangular tasting experiments and testing the validity of a distribution model. Note continued: Example 5.23 Confidence limits associated with duo-trio tasting experiments and testing the validity of a distribution model --
Example 5.24 Probability of obtaining the required value of sample standard deviation --
Example 5.25 Confidence limits of population means and standard deviations --
Example 5.26 One way analysis of variance to test consumer preference of different cake formulations --
Example 5.27 Two way analysis of variance to check the difference between the scores of different panel members, and the difference in the scatter of the test scores --
5.3. Empirical models and linear regression --
Example 5.28 Survival kinetics of freeze dried lactic acid bacteria --
5.4. Quality control charts for measurements --
Example 5.29 The means and range charts for a packaging process --
Example 5.30 Means and range charts for storage of eggs --
Example 5.31 Process capability index as a measure of the goodness of the quality control chart. Note continued: Example 5.32 Quality control charts for alcohol content of bottled beer --
Example 5.33 Analysis of sour dough bread-making process --
5.5. Quality control charts for attributes --
Example 5.34 The np and p charts for quality control of confectionery products --
Example 5.35 The p charts with variable sample size --
Example 5.36 c chart for more than one type of defect --
5.6. Acceptance sampling by attributes --
Example 5.37 OC curve by using the binomial distribution model --
Example 5.38 OC curve by using the Poisson distribution model --
Example 5.39 An OC curve to satisfy the required LTPD and AQL values --
Example 5.40 Construction of the AOQ% curves --
Example 5.41 Average out going quality limits from the OC curves --
5.7. Standard sampling plans for attributes --
i). Military Standard Sampling Plan 105D --
Example 5.42 Use of Military Plan 105D for sampling of apples. Note continued: Example 5.43 Use of Military Plan 105D for sampling of individually wrapped sliced cheese --
Example 5.44 Use of Military Plan 105D for sampling of products with seasonally changing risk of spoilage --
ii). USDA Sampling Plan --
Example 5.45 Sampling plan with USDA tables for canned beans --
Example 5.46 Sampling plan with USDA tables for packaged dried apricots --
Example 5.47 Sampling plan with USDA tables for soup in containers --
Example 5.48 Sampling plan with USDA tables for frozen mixed vegetables --
iii). The Dodge and Romig Tables --
Example 5.49 Sampling plan with Dodge and Romig Tables for apples --
iv). FDA sampling plan for mycotoxin analysis --
Example 5.50 Aflotoxin sampling and analysis program for peanuts --
5.8. HACCP principles --
Example 5.51 Philsbury's Hazard and quality control plan --
Example 5.52 HACCP flow diagram for cake mix --
Example 5.53 Model based approach to automated hazard identification. Note continued: Example 5.54 Predictive microbial modeling --
5.9. Process control through mathematical modeling --
Example 5.55 Feed-back temperature control system for microwave ovens --
Example 5.56 Dryer control --
Example 5.57 Computer control of citrus juice evaporator --
Example 5.58 Computer control of batch retort operations with on-line correction of process deviations --
Example 5.59 Computer control of bakers' yeast production --
Example 5.60 Simulation and control of glucose concentration in hot-water blanching of potatoes --
Example 5.61 Grain dryer controllers --
References.
Series Title: Topics in chemical engineering, v. 12.
Responsibility: Mustafa Özilgen.

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   schema:description "Note continued: Example 5.3 Residence time distribution in non-Newtonian flow during thermal processing -- Example 5.4 Probability of having more than a limiting weight of contents in a randomly selected can -- Example 5.5 Probability of having a certain fraction of loss in fruit packing -- Example 5.6 Fraction of the total production falling between given limits -- Example 5.7 The maximum tolerable standard deviation -- Example 5.8 Probability of having a sample mean smaller than a given value -- Example 5.9 Use of the standard normal variable due to the similarity of the normal, Poisson and Gaussian distribution curves -- Example 5.10 Statistical properties of broiler feeds and their raw materials -- Example 5.11 Estimation of the population mean and variance from those of the additive contributing factors -- Example 5.12 Estimate of the population mean and variance from food formulation, and those of the contributing factors."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 4.39 Mass transfer in mixed solute osmotic dehydration of apple rings -- 4.6. Mathematical modeling of filtration and membrane separation processes -- Example 4.40 Constant pressure filtration process of poultry chiller water -- Example 4.41 Effect of the tube diameter on the ultrafiltration rates of apple juice in a process utilizing single pass metallic ultrafiltration tubes -- Example 4.42 Unsteady-state permeate flux of crossflow microfiltration -- Example 4.43 A model for decreasing flux via gel and cake formation and membrane fouling in cheese whey ultrafiltration -- 4.7. Mathematical modeling of extraction processes -- Example 4.44 Extraction of sugar from beets -- Example 4.45 Countercurrent desalting of pickles -- Example 4.46 Chart solution to unsteady state leaching problems with negligible external mass transfer resistance -- Example 4.47 Mathematical modeling of blanching potatoes."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: 4.3. Mathematical modeling of crystallization processes -- Example 4.18 Critical embryo size for stable ice nucleation -- Example 4.19 Kinetics of homogeneous ice nucleation -- Example 4.20 Kinetics of heterogeneous ice nucleation -- Example 4.21 Modeling crystal growth with combined solute diffusion and surface reaction -- Example 4.22 Kinetics of potassium bitartarate crystallization from wines -- Example 4.23 Nucleation and growth kinetics of lactose -- Example 4.24 Kinetics of recrystallization of ice in frozen beef tissue -- Example 4.25 Kinetics of recrystallization of ice during ripening in freeze concentration -- 4.4. Freezing time calculations -- Example 4.26 Freezing time calculations with Plank's equation -- Example 4.27 Cleland and Earle's model to predict heating and cooling rates of solids including those with irregular shapes -- Example 4.28 Cleland and Earle's simplified model for prediction of the freezing times."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 2.30 Temperature profiles along a spherical potato tuber during blanching -- Example 2.31 Temperature profiles along a spherical potato tuber during thermal processing in a can -- References -- ch. 3 Kinetic Modeling -- 3.1. Kinetics and Food Processing -- 3.2. The Rate Expression -- Example 3.1 Ascorbic acid loss in packaged and non-packaged broccoli -- Example 3.2 Simultaneous nutrient and toxin degradation during thermal processing -- Example 3.3 Shelf life calculation based on nutrient loss -- Example 3.4 Kinetics of nutrient loss with sequential chemical reactions -- 3.3. Why do the chemicals react? -- i). Collision Theory -- ii). Transition State Theory -- 3.4. Temperature effects on the reaction rates -- Example 3.5 Vitamin loss in a snack food -- Example 3.6 Total amounts of nutrient loss after sequences of a canning process -- 3.5. Precision of reaction rate constants and activation energy measurements."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 2.4 Compensation relations for diffusivity of water in starch -- 2.6. Analytical solutions to ordinary differential equations -- Example 2.5 Characterization of a differential equation -- Example 2.6 Heat transfer in a continuous plug flow sterilization reactor -- Example 2.7 Diffusion of the modified atmosphere gas mixtures through a polymer film -- 2.7. Transport phenomena models involving partial differential equations -- Example 2.8 Temperature profiles in a steak during frying and in meat analog during cooking -- Example 2.9 Temperature profiles in a spherical potato tuber during blanching -- Example 2.10 Temperature profiles in a sausage during cooking -- Example 2.11 Determination of the temperature profile in a spherical potato tuber by using the generalized Bessel's equation -- Example 2.12 Liquid diffusion model for drying rough rice -- Example 2.13 Salting of semi-hard ripened cheese."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 5.13 Additive property of population means and variances -- Example 5.14 Dependence of the confidence limits on the sample size -- Example 5.15 Hypothesis testing concerning one mean when the population standard deviation is known -- Example 5.16 Hypothesis testing concerning two means when the population standard deviations are known -- Example 5.17 Hypothesis testing concerning one and two means when the population standard deviations are not known -- Example 5.18 Effect of the probability level on the results of the hypothesis testing -- Example 5.19 Confidence limits with binomial distribution -- Example 5.20 Confidence limits with Poisson distribution -- Example 5.21 Testing the validity of normal distribution assumption -- Example 5.22 Confidence limits associated with triangular tasting experiments and testing the validity of a distribution model."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 5.23 Confidence limits associated with duo-trio tasting experiments and testing the validity of a distribution model -- Example 5.24 Probability of obtaining the required value of sample standard deviation -- Example 5.25 Confidence limits of population means and standard deviations -- Example 5.26 One way analysis of variance to test consumer preference of different cake formulations -- Example 5.27 Two way analysis of variance to check the difference between the scores of different panel members, and the difference in the scatter of the test scores -- 5.3. Empirical models and linear regression -- Example 5.28 Survival kinetics of freeze dried lactic acid bacteria -- 5.4. Quality control charts for measurements -- Example 5.29 The means and range charts for a packaging process -- Example 5.30 Means and range charts for storage of eggs -- Example 5.31 Process capability index as a measure of the goodness of the quality control chart."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 4.29 Mathematical model for nonsymmetric freezing of beef -- Example 4.30 Prediction of freezing times with an enthalpy-based numerical method -- 4.5. Mathematical modeling of drying and frying processes -- i). The basic model of drying -- ii). Hallstrom and co-worker's regular regime model -- iii). Shrinking-core model -- Example 4.31 Expressions for the diffusivity of moisture in pasta and bakery products -- Example 4.32 Modeling simultaneous heat and mass transfer in foods with dimensional changes and variable transport parameters -- Example 4.33 Drying behavior of thin biscuits during baking process -- Example 4.34 Modeling heat and mass transfer to cookies undergoing commercial baking -- Example 4.35 Modeling of wheat drying in fluidized beds -- Example 4.36 Heat and mass transfer in freeze drying -- Example 4.37 Heat and mass transport in convection oven frying -- Example 4.38 Heat and mass transport in immersion-fat frying."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 3.17 Kinetics of the change of texture and taste of potatoes during cooking -- 3.9. Microbial kinetics -- Example 3.18 Mixed culture interactions between P. vulgaris and S. cerevisiae -- Example 3.19 Kinetics of microbial growth, gas production and increase in dough volume during leavening -- Example 3.20 Kinetics of microbial growth and lactic acid production by mixed cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus in yogurt production -- Example 3.21 Kinetics of spontaneous wine production -- Example 3.22 Kinetics of Aspergillus oryzae cultivations on starch -- Example 3.23 Dynamic response to perturbations in a chemostat during ethanol production -- 3.10. Kinetics of microbial death -- Example 3.24 Kinetic compensation relations for microbial death -- Example 3.25 Relation between the death rate and the Arrhenius expression constants and the D and z values -- Example 3.26 Mechanisms for death of spores."@en ;
   schema:description "Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 What is process modeling? -- Example 1.1 Death kinetics of microorganisms in dough -- Example 1.2 Kinetics of galactose oxidase production -- Example 1.3 Kinetics of lipid oxidation in foods -- Example 1.4 Analogy between cake filtration and ultrafiltration processes -- References -- ch. 2 Transport phenomena models -- 2.1. The general property balance equation -- 2.2. Equation of continuity -- Example 2.1 Diffusion of water through a wine barrel during aging -- 2.3. Equation of energy -- 2.4. Equation of motion -- 2.5. Theories for liquid transport coefficients -- i). Eyring's theory of liquid viscosity -- Example 2.2 Kinetic compensation relations for the viscosity of fruit juices -- ii). Thermal conductivity of liquids -- iii). Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in liquids -- iv). Eyring's theory of liquid diffusion -- Example 2.3 Temperature effects on diffusivity of water in starch."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: 2.8. Chart solutions to unsteady state conduction problems -- Example 2.14 Estimation of processing time and local temperatures during thermal processing of a conduction heating food by using charts -- 2.9. Interfacial mass transfer -- 2.10. Correlations for parameters of the transport equations -- i). Density of dried vegetables -- ii). Specific heat -- iii). Thermal conductivity of meat -- iv). Viscosity of microbial suspensions -- v). Moisture diffusivity in granular starch -- vi). Convective heat transfer coefficients during heat transfer to canned foods in steritort -- vii). Mass transfer coefficient k for oxygen transfer in fermenters -- Example 2.15 Drying behavior of frozen beef -- Example 2.16 Theoretical expressions for interfacial mass transfer coefficients -- 2.11. Rheological modeling -- Example 2.17 Rheological behavior of the orange juice concentrate -- Example 2.18 Rheological aspects of extrusion processes."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 4.48 Fractionation of citrus oils by using a membrane based extraction process -- Example 4.49 Supercritical extraction of fish oils -- Example 4.50 Continuous supercritical carbon dioxide processing of anhydrous milk fat in a packed column -- 4.8. Mathematical analysis of the processes for distilled beverage production -- Example 4.51 Analysis of whiskey production in a pot still -- Example 4.52 Distillation column design with McCabe and Thiele method for separation of ethanol from a fermentation product -- Example 4.53 Estimation of the tray number for maximum accumulation of congeners during brandy production -- References -- ch. 5 Statistical process analysis and quality control -- 5.1. Statistical quality control -- Example 5.1 Stagewise quality control in winemaking -- 5.2. Statistical process analysis -- Example 5.2 Cell size distribution in corn extrudates."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 5.32 Quality control charts for alcohol content of bottled beer -- Example 5.33 Analysis of sour dough bread-making process -- 5.5. Quality control charts for attributes -- Example 5.34 The np and p charts for quality control of confectionery products -- Example 5.35 The p charts with variable sample size -- Example 5.36 c chart for more than one type of defect -- 5.6. Acceptance sampling by attributes -- Example 5.37 OC curve by using the binomial distribution model -- Example 5.38 OC curve by using the Poisson distribution model -- Example 5.39 An OC curve to satisfy the required LTPD and AQL values -- Example 5.40 Construction of the AOQ% curves -- Example 5.41 Average out going quality limits from the OC curves -- 5.7. Standard sampling plans for attributes -- i). Military Standard Sampling Plan 105D -- Example 5.42 Use of Military Plan 105D for sampling of apples."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 3.27 A model for pasteurization with microwaves in a tubular flow reactor -- Example 3.28 Kinetics of ultraviolet inactivation processes -- References -- ch. 4 Mathematical modeling in Food Engineering operations -- 4.1. Thermal process modeling -- Example 4.1 Calculation of process time and nutrient loss at a constant temperature -- Example 4.2 Implications of the cooking values -- Example 4.3 Process time calculation with variable time temperature profile -- Example 4.4 Perfect convection model of thermal processing -- Example 4.5 Perfect conduction model of thermal processing -- Example 4.6 Calculation of fn and j values from the physical properties of the food and the use of Ball's formula method for thermal process calculation -- Example 4.7 Use of Ball's formula method with changing can size -- Example 4.8 Wehrle-Merson model to predict critical point temperatures of conduction heating foods for short heating times."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 5.43 Use of Military Plan 105D for sampling of individually wrapped sliced cheese -- Example 5.44 Use of Military Plan 105D for sampling of products with seasonally changing risk of spoilage -- ii). USDA Sampling Plan -- Example 5.45 Sampling plan with USDA tables for canned beans -- Example 5.46 Sampling plan with USDA tables for packaged dried apricots -- Example 5.47 Sampling plan with USDA tables for soup in containers -- Example 5.48 Sampling plan with USDA tables for frozen mixed vegetables -- iii). The Dodge and Romig Tables -- Example 5.49 Sampling plan with Dodge and Romig Tables for apples -- iv). FDA sampling plan for mycotoxin analysis -- Example 5.50 Aflotoxin sampling and analysis program for peanuts -- 5.8. HACCP principles -- Example 5.51 Philsbury's Hazard and quality control plan -- Example 5.52 HACCP flow diagram for cake mix -- Example 5.53 Model based approach to automated hazard identification."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 4.9 Lethality-Fourier number method for process calculation -- Example 4.10 A transfer function approach to predict transient internal temperatures during sterilization -- Example 4.11 Thermal process calculation by using the residence time distribution in a holding tube -- Example 4.12 Use of axially dispersed plug flow model in continuous thermal process calculations -- Example 4.13 Continuous processing of liquid foods containing particles -- 4.2. Mathematical modeling of evaporation processes -- Example 4.14 Basic calculations for a single effect tomato paste concentration process -- Example 4.15 Basic calculations for a double effect tomato paste concentration process -- Example 4.16 Computer simulation of the dynamic behavior in a rotary steam-coil vacuum evaporator during concentration of tomato paste -- Example 4.17 Modeling the operation of the multiple effect evaporators used in the sugar industry."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 5.54 Predictive microbial modeling -- 5.9. Process control through mathematical modeling -- Example 5.55 Feed-back temperature control system for microwave ovens -- Example 5.56 Dryer control -- Example 5.57 Computer control of citrus juice evaporator -- Example 5.58 Computer control of batch retort operations with on-line correction of process deviations -- Example 5.59 Computer control of bakers' yeast production -- Example 5.60 Simulation and control of glucose concentration in hot-water blanching of potatoes -- Example 5.61 Grain dryer controllers -- References."@en ;
   schema:description "Note continued: Example 2.19 Maxwell, Kevin-Voigt and Burgers models of the stress-strain relations -- Example 2.20 Visco-elastic behavior of cheddar cheese and potato flesh -- Example 2.21 Stress relaxation of fruit gels -- 2.12. The Engineering Bernoulli equation -- Example 2.22 Shrinkage and whey expulsion in rennet curd -- Example 2.23 Pump power requirement with a Herschel-Bulkley fluid -- 2.13. Laplace transformations in mathematical modeling -- Example 2.24 Solution of a linear ordinary differential equation with Laplace transformations -- Example 2.25 Diffusion of salt into semi hard white cheese -- Example 2.26 Temperature profiles in a steak during frying -- 2.14. Numerical methods in mathematical modeling -- Example 2.27 Canonical form of a third order non-linear heterogeneous ordinary differential equation -- Example 2.28 Drying behavior of honey-starch mixtures -- Example 2.29 Drying behavior of an apple slice."@en ;
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