Fort Union and the upper Missouri fur trade (Book, 2001) [WorldCat.org]
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Fort Union and the upper Missouri fur trade

Author: Barton H Barbour
Publisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [2001] ©2001
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"In this book, Barton Barbour presents the first comprehensive history of Fort Union, the nineteenth century's most important and longest-lived Upper Missouri River fur trading post. Barbour explores the economic, social, legal, cultural, and political significance of the fort, which was the brainchild of Kenneth McKenzie and Pierre Chouteau, Jr., and a part of John Jacob Astor's fur trade empire. From 1830 to 1867,
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Barton H Barbour
ISBN: 0806132957 9780806132952
OCLC Number: 44594032
Awards: Commended for Spur Awards (Nonfiction-Historical) 2002
Description: xvi, 304 pages : illustrations, 1 map ; 24 cm
Contents: Ch. 1. The Construction of Fort Union --
Ch. 2. Artists, Scientists, Explorers, and Missionaries at Fort Union --
Ch. 3. Fort Union's Society --
Ch. 4. Fur Traders, Trade and Intercourse Laws, and Indian Policy --
Ch. 5. "Masters of the Country"? --
Ch. 6. The Decline of Fort Union.
Responsibility: Barton H. Barbour.

Abstract:

"In this book, Barton Barbour presents the first comprehensive history of Fort Union, the nineteenth century's most important and longest-lived Upper Missouri River fur trading post. Barbour explores the economic, social, legal, cultural, and political significance of the fort, which was the brainchild of Kenneth McKenzie and Pierre Chouteau, Jr., and a part of John Jacob Astor's fur trade empire. From 1830 to 1867, Fort Union symbolized the power of New York and St. Louis, and later, St. Paul merchants' capital in the West. The most lucrative post on the northern plains, Fort Union affected national relations with a number of Native tribes, such as the Assiniboine, Cree, Crow, Sioux, and Blackfeet.

It also influenced American interactions with Great Britain, whose powerful Hudson's Bay Company competed for Upper Missouri furs."--Jacket.

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