Frenzy (Computer file, 2018) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
New WorldCat.org coming soon
Frenzy
Checking...

Frenzy

Author: Ian Cooper, (Freelance writer)
Publisher: Leighton Buzzard : Auteur, 2018.
Series: Devil's advocates.
Edition/Format:   Computer file : English : First edition
Summary:
"Frenzy (1972) was Alfred Hitchcock's penultimate film, and arguably one of his most misunderstood and neglected. Whereas even Psycho (1960) did eventually become respectable - indeed, it's a good contender for the most admired of the Master's films - Frenzy still remains problematic for many. While Raymond De Foery makes his feelings clear in the title of his book, Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece,  Read more...
Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Alfred Hitchcock; Alfred Hitchcock
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Ian Cooper, (Freelance writer)
ISBN: 9781800850354 1800850352 9781911325376 191132537X 9781800347090 180034709X
OCLC Number: 1331797410
Description: 1 online resource (94 pages).
Contents: Amuse-bouche --
The Starter --
Entrée --
Main Course --
Last Supper.
Series Title: Devil's advocates.
Responsibility: Ian Cooper.

Abstract:

"Frenzy (1972) was Alfred Hitchcock's penultimate film, and arguably one of his most misunderstood and neglected. Whereas even Psycho (1960) did eventually become respectable - indeed, it's a good contender for the most admired of the Master's films - Frenzy still remains problematic for many. While Raymond De Foery makes his feelings clear in the title of his book, Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece, Hitchcock's controversial biographer Donald Spoto calls the film "repulsive" and "a closed and coldly negative vision of human possibility". Frenzy is perhaps Hitchcock's most nakedly autobiographical film and one which represented both a comeback and farewell to the city of his birth. But it started out as a very different kind of project. This Devil's Advocate discusses the evolution of the film, its production, reception, and place in Hitchcock's oeuvre, as well as its status as, the author argues, a key film of 'sleazy Seventies' British cinema"--Abstract.

Reviews

Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.