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Fruit quality and its biological basis

Author: Michael Knee
Publisher: Sheffield : Sheffield Academic Press ; Boca Raton : CRC Press, 2002.
Series: Sheffield biological sciences.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Fruit technology draws on biology and engineering to maintain quality during storage, distribution and marketing. This book focuses on the biological processes that determine appearance, texture, taste, nutritional value, and flavor of fleshy fruits. It also focuses on the ways by which these biological processes can be manipulated to maximize quality for the consumer. The book discusses the advances in the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Aufsatzsammlung
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Knee
ISBN: 1841272302 9781841272306 0849397812 9780849397813
OCLC Number: 47900423
Description: xiii, 279 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. FRUITS IN THE GLOBAL MARKET / Adel A. Kader --
1.1 Introduction --
1.2 Classification of fruits based on postharvest considerations --
1.3 World fruit production and trade --
1.4 Importance of fruits and nuts in human nutrition and health --
1.5 Fruit composition and quality --
1.6 Quality attributes of fruits --
1.7 Fruit maturity, ripening and quality relationships --
1.8 Factors influencing quality --
1.9 Food safety assurance --
References --
2. INORGANIC NUTRIENTS AND FRUIT QUALITY / Ian B. Ferguson and Linda M. Boyd --
2.1 Introduction --
2.2 Inorganic contents of fruit and how they are achieved [2.2.1 Concentrations in mature fruit --
2.2.2 Patterns of mineral input --
2.2.3 Factors influencing mineral input --
2.2.3 Horticultural practices influencing fruit mineral contents] --
2.3 Inorganic nutrients and fruit quality at harvest and during postharvest storage [2.3.1 Fruit colour --
2.3.2 Flavour --
2.3.3 Fresh firmness --
2.3.4 Ripening --
2.3.5 Rots --
2.3.6 Specific nutrient-related disorders and postharvest responses --
2.3.7 Prediction of disorders] --
2.4 Inorganic nutrients in relation to human nutrition and the consumer [2.4.1 Health and fruit consumption --
2.4.2 Fruit as a direct source of minerals] --
2.5 Genetic approaches --
2.6 Conclusions --
References --
3. FRUIT TEXTURE, CELL WALL METABOLISM, AND CONSUMER PERCEPTIOSN / Robert J. Redgwell and Monica Fischer --
3.1 Introduction --
3.2 Texture and the cell wall --
3.3 Chemistry of the fruit cell wall [3.3.1 Rhamnogalacturonans --
3.3.2 Xyloglucans --
3.3.3 Galactoglucomannans --
3.3.4 Glucuronoarabinoxylans --
3.3.5 Cellulose --
3.3.6 Proteins] --
3.4 Changes to polysaccharides during fruit softening [3.4.1 Pectic polysaccharides --
3.4.2 Xyloglucans --
3.4.3 Galactoglucomannans and glucuronoarabinoxylans --
3.4.4 Cellulose] --
3.5 Cell-wall associated enzymes: role in texture change [3.5.1 Polygalacturonase in tomato --
3.5.2 Polygalacturonases in other fruit --
3.5.3 Rhamnogalacturonase --
3.5.4 Pectin methylesterase --
3.5.5 B-Galactosidase --
3.5.6 Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase --
3.5.7 Endo-B-1,4-glucanase] --
3.6 Non-enzymatic mechanisms of change [3.6.1 Expansins --
3.6.2 Hydroxyl radicals and cell wall lysis --
3.6.3 Calcium and the apoplast] --
3.7 Wall oligosaccharides as ripening regulators --
3.8 Cell wall synthesis during ripening --
3.9 Low temperature disorders [3.9.1 Mealiness and chilling injury --
3.9.2 Low temperature breakdown in kiwifruit] --
3.10 Consumer perception [3.10.1 Quality and increased consumption --
3.10.2 Firmness and freshness --
3.10.3 Mealiness --
3.10.4 Applications of biotechnology] --
3.11 Conclusions --
References --
4. FRUIT FLAVOR, VOLATILE METABOLISM, AND CONSUMER PERCEPTIONS / Elizabeth A. Baldwin --
4.1 Introduction --
4.2 Flavor is an elusive trait --
4.3 Flavor components in fruits --
4.4 Measurement of flavor components --
4.5 Biochemical pathways that produce flavor components in fruits --
4.6 Perception of flavor components --
4.7 Measurement of flavor perception --
4.8 Conclusions --
References --
5. TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT / Susan Lurie --
5.1 Preharvest temperatures [5.1.1 Fruit growth and development --
5.1.2 Susceptibility to storage disorders] --
5.2 Removing field heat [5.2.1 Hydrocooling --
5.2.2 Forced air cooling --
5.2.3 Delayed cooling] --
5.3 Storage temperatures [5.3.1 Prestorage heat treatments --
5.3.2 Intermittent warming, step down cooling, and dual temperature regimes] --
5.4 Conclusions --
References --
6. ATMOSPHERE CONTROL USING OXYGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE / Nazir Mir and Randolph Beaudry --
6.1 Introduction --
6.2 Respiratory metabolism [6.2.1 Biochemical responses of the respiratory chain to O2 and CO2 --
6.2.2 Whole tissue respiratory responses to O2 and CO2] --
6.3 Ethylene biology --
6.4 Secondary metabolic pathways --
6.5 Conclusions --
References --
7. MECHANICAL INJURY / Michael Knee and A. Raymond Miller --
7.1 Introduction --
7.2 Fruit anatomy --
7.3 Fruit cells --
7.4 Causes of injury --
7.5 Losses caused by mechanical injury --
7.6 Fruit impact injuries [7.6.1 General features of impact injury --
7.6.2 Energy and impact injury --
7.6.3 Cellular structure and impact injury --
7.6.4 Factors affecting impact damage --
7.6.5 Impact injury and harvest maturity --
7.6.6 Ripening and impact injury --
7.6.7 Temperature and impact injury] --
7.7 Compression damage --
7.8 Vibration --
7.9 Prevention of damage --
7.10 Detection of injury --
7.11 Metabolism in injured tissue [7.11.1 Phenolics --
7.11.2 Respiration --
7.11.3 Ethylene synthesis --
7.11.4 Other metabolic changes --
7.11.5 Summary time line of changes following injury] --
7.12 Conclusions --
References --
8. ETHYLENE SYNTHESIS, MODE OF ACTION, CONSEQUENCES, AND CONTROL / Christopher B. Watkins --
8.1 Introduction --
8.2 Fruit ripening and interactions with ethylene [8.2.1 Non-climacteric and climacteric fruit --
8.2.2 Ethylene and fruit quality --
8.2.3 Active ethylene concentrations --
8.2.4 Control of ethylene production and action --
8.2.5 Pre- and post-harvest ethylene application] --
8.3 Ethylene biosynthesis and perception [8.3.1 Ethylene biosynthesis --
8.3.2 Interaction with other pathways --
8.3.3 Ethylene perception --
8.3.4 Negative and positive feedback inhibition --
8.3.5 Ethylene-dependent and independent events --
8.3.6 Transgenic approaches for reducing ethylene production] --
8.4 Effects of postharvest treatments on ethylene biosynthesis and perception [8.4.1 Storage temperature --
8.4.2 Storage atmospheres --
8.4.3 Heat treatments --
8.4.4 1-Methylcyclopropene] --
8.5 Summary --
References --
9. MANAGEMENT OF POSTHARVEST DISEASES / David Sugar --
9.1 Introduction --
9.2 The nature of postharvest disease --
9.3 Opportunities for infection [9.3.1 The role of wounds --
9.3.2 Lenticel infections --
9.3.3 Quiescent infections --
9.3.4 Floral infections] --
9.4 Factors influencing fruit susceptibility to postharvest disease [9.4.1 Fruit maturity --
9.4.2 Interaction with pathogen enzymes --
9.4.3 Fruit calcium and decay resistance --
9.4.4 Fruit nitrogen and decay resistance] --
9.5 Disease management strategies [9.5.1 Presence of the pathogen --
9.5.2 Storage conditions --
9.5.3 Fungicide treatment --
9.5.4 Fungicide resistance --
9.5.5 Biological control --
9.5.6 Storage atmospheres --
9.5.7 Novel treatments --
9.5.8 Integrated management of postharvest disease] --
References --
10. GENETIC CONTROL OF FRUIT RIPENING / Graham B. Seymour and Kenneth Manning --
10.1 Introduction --
10.2 Evolution and development of fleshy fruits --
10.3 Texture --
10.4 Colour --
10.5 Flavour --
10.6 Hormonal regulation --
10.7 Ripening-regulatory genes: current progress and future prospects --
References.
Series Title: Sheffield biological sciences.
Responsibility: edited by Michael Knee.
More information:

Abstract:

Fruits contribute valuable nutrients and welcome variety to the human diet. Although they are often highly perishable, fruits may be transported around the world or held in storage for up to a year.  Read more...

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   schema:description "1. FRUITS IN THE GLOBAL MARKET / Adel A. Kader -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Classification of fruits based on postharvest considerations -- 1.3 World fruit production and trade -- 1.4 Importance of fruits and nuts in human nutrition and health -- 1.5 Fruit composition and quality -- 1.6 Quality attributes of fruits -- 1.7 Fruit maturity, ripening and quality relationships -- 1.8 Factors influencing quality -- 1.9 Food safety assurance -- References -- 2. INORGANIC NUTRIENTS AND FRUIT QUALITY / Ian B. Ferguson and Linda M. Boyd -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Inorganic contents of fruit and how they are achieved [2.2.1 Concentrations in mature fruit -- 2.2.2 Patterns of mineral input -- 2.2.3 Factors influencing mineral input -- 2.2.3 Horticultural practices influencing fruit mineral contents] -- 2.3 Inorganic nutrients and fruit quality at harvest and during postharvest storage [2.3.1 Fruit colour -- 2.3.2 Flavour -- 2.3.3 Fresh firmness -- 2.3.4 Ripening -- 2.3.5 Rots -- 2.3.6 Specific nutrient-related disorders and postharvest responses -- 2.3.7 Prediction of disorders] -- 2.4 Inorganic nutrients in relation to human nutrition and the consumer [2.4.1 Health and fruit consumption -- 2.4.2 Fruit as a direct source of minerals] -- 2.5 Genetic approaches -- 2.6 Conclusions -- References -- 3. FRUIT TEXTURE, CELL WALL METABOLISM, AND CONSUMER PERCEPTIOSN / Robert J. Redgwell and Monica Fischer -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Texture and the cell wall -- 3.3 Chemistry of the fruit cell wall [3.3.1 Rhamnogalacturonans -- 3.3.2 Xyloglucans -- 3.3.3 Galactoglucomannans -- 3.3.4 Glucuronoarabinoxylans -- 3.3.5 Cellulose -- 3.3.6 Proteins] -- 3.4 Changes to polysaccharides during fruit softening [3.4.1 Pectic polysaccharides -- 3.4.2 Xyloglucans -- 3.4.3 Galactoglucomannans and glucuronoarabinoxylans -- 3.4.4 Cellulose] -- 3.5 Cell-wall associated enzymes: role in texture change [3.5.1 Polygalacturonase in tomato -- 3.5.2 Polygalacturonases in other fruit -- 3.5.3 Rhamnogalacturonase -- 3.5.4 Pectin methylesterase -- 3.5.5 B-Galactosidase -- 3.5.6 Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase -- 3.5.7 Endo-B-1,4-glucanase] -- 3.6 Non-enzymatic mechanisms of change [3.6.1 Expansins -- 3.6.2 Hydroxyl radicals and cell wall lysis -- 3.6.3 Calcium and the apoplast] -- 3.7 Wall oligosaccharides as ripening regulators -- 3.8 Cell wall synthesis during ripening -- 3.9 Low temperature disorders [3.9.1 Mealiness and chilling injury -- 3.9.2 Low temperature breakdown in kiwifruit] -- 3.10 Consumer perception [3.10.1 Quality and increased consumption -- 3.10.2 Firmness and freshness -- 3.10.3 Mealiness -- 3.10.4 Applications of biotechnology] -- 3.11 Conclusions -- References -- 4. FRUIT FLAVOR, VOLATILE METABOLISM, AND CONSUMER PERCEPTIONS / Elizabeth A. Baldwin -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Flavor is an elusive trait -- 4.3 Flavor components in fruits -- 4.4 Measurement of flavor components -- 4.5 Biochemical pathways that produce flavor components in fruits -- 4.6 Perception of flavor components -- 4.7 Measurement of flavor perception -- 4.8 Conclusions -- References -- 5. TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT / Susan Lurie -- 5.1 Preharvest temperatures [5.1.1 Fruit growth and development -- 5.1.2 Susceptibility to storage disorders] -- 5.2 Removing field heat [5.2.1 Hydrocooling -- 5.2.2 Forced air cooling -- 5.2.3 Delayed cooling] -- 5.3 Storage temperatures [5.3.1 Prestorage heat treatments -- 5.3.2 Intermittent warming, step down cooling, and dual temperature regimes] -- 5.4 Conclusions -- References -- 6. ATMOSPHERE CONTROL USING OXYGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE / Nazir Mir and Randolph Beaudry -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Respiratory metabolism [6.2.1 Biochemical responses of the respiratory chain to O2 and CO2 -- 6.2.2 Whole tissue respiratory responses to O2 and CO2] -- 6.3 Ethylene biology -- 6.4 Secondary metabolic pathways -- 6.5 Conclusions -- References -- 7. MECHANICAL INJURY / Michael Knee and A. Raymond Miller -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Fruit anatomy -- 7.3 Fruit cells -- 7.4 Causes of injury -- 7.5 Losses caused by mechanical injury -- 7.6 Fruit impact injuries [7.6.1 General features of impact injury -- 7.6.2 Energy and impact injury -- 7.6.3 Cellular structure and impact injury -- 7.6.4 Factors affecting impact damage -- 7.6.5 Impact injury and harvest maturity -- 7.6.6 Ripening and impact injury -- 7.6.7 Temperature and impact injury] -- 7.7 Compression damage -- 7.8 Vibration -- 7.9 Prevention of damage -- 7.10 Detection of injury -- 7.11 Metabolism in injured tissue [7.11.1 Phenolics -- 7.11.2 Respiration -- 7.11.3 Ethylene synthesis -- 7.11.4 Other metabolic changes -- 7.11.5 Summary time line of changes following injury] -- 7.12 Conclusions -- References -- 8. ETHYLENE SYNTHESIS, MODE OF ACTION, CONSEQUENCES, AND CONTROL / Christopher B. Watkins -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Fruit ripening and interactions with ethylene [8.2.1 Non-climacteric and climacteric fruit -- 8.2.2 Ethylene and fruit quality -- 8.2.3 Active ethylene concentrations -- 8.2.4 Control of ethylene production and action -- 8.2.5 Pre- and post-harvest ethylene application] -- 8.3 Ethylene biosynthesis and perception [8.3.1 Ethylene biosynthesis -- 8.3.2 Interaction with other pathways -- 8.3.3 Ethylene perception -- 8.3.4 Negative and positive feedback inhibition -- 8.3.5 Ethylene-dependent and independent events -- 8.3.6 Transgenic approaches for reducing ethylene production] -- 8.4 Effects of postharvest treatments on ethylene biosynthesis and perception [8.4.1 Storage temperature -- 8.4.2 Storage atmospheres -- 8.4.3 Heat treatments -- 8.4.4 1-Methylcyclopropene] -- 8.5 Summary -- References -- 9. 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