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The gardener and the carpenter : what the new science of child development tells us about the relationship between parents and children Preview this item
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The gardener and the carpenter : what the new science of child development tells us about the relationship between parents and children

Author: Alison Gopnik
Publisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, [2016]
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Alison Gopnik, a leading developmental psychologist, illuminates the paradoxes of parenthood from a scientific perspective"--
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Alison Gopnik
ISBN: 9780374229702 0374229708
OCLC Number: 934795217
Description: x, 302 pages ; 22 cm
Contents: Introduction: The parent paradoxes --
Against parenting --
The evolution of childhood --
The evolution of love --
Learning through looking --
Learning through listening --
The work of play --
Growing up --
The future and the past : children and technology --
The value of children.
Responsibility: Alison Gopnik.

Abstract:

"Alison Gopnik, a leading developmental psychologist, illuminates the paradoxes of parenthood from a scientific perspective"--

"Caring deeply about our children is part of what makes us human. Yet the thing we call 'parenting' is a surprisingly new invention. In the past thirty years, the concept of parenting and the multibillion dollar industry surrounding it have transformed child care into obsessive, controlling, and goal-oriented labor intended to create a particular kind of child and therefore a particular kind of adult. In The Gardener and the Carpenter, the pioneering developmental psychologist and philosopher Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar twenty-first-century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong--it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too. Drawing on the study of human evolution and her own cutting-edge scientific research into how children learn, Gopnik shows that although caring for children is profoundly important, it is not a matter of shaping them to turn out a particular way. Children are designed to be messy and unpredictable, playful and imaginative, and to be very different both from their parents and from each other. The variability and flexibility of childhood lets them innovate, create, and survive in an unpredictable world. 'Parenting' won't make children learn--but caring parents let children learn by creating a secure, loving environment."--Provided by publisher.

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