Geoffrey Chaucer : the Critical Heritage Volume 1 1385-1837. (eBook, 2002) [WorldCat.org]
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Geoffrey Chaucer : the Critical Heritage Volume 1 1385-1837.

Author: Derek Brewer
Publisher: London : Taylor and Francis, 2002. ©2003
Series: Critical heritage series.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Summary:
First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Brewer, Derek.
Geoffrey Chaucer : The Critical Heritage Volume 1 1385-1837.
London : Taylor and Francis, ©2002
Named Person: Geoffrey Chaucer
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Derek Brewer
ISBN: 9780203196199 0203196198
OCLC Number: 1048251187
Description: 1 online resource (355 pages).
Contents: Book Cover --
Title --
Contents --
INTRODUCTION --
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE --
THE PRINCIPAL EDITIONS OF CHAUCER's 'WORKS' UP TO 1933 --
EUSTACHE DESCHAMPS, Great Ovid, c. 1385 --
THOMAS USK, Love praises the philosophical poet, c. 1387 --
JOHN GOWER, Venus sends greetings, c. 1390 --
JOHN LYDGATE, The Gothic poet, c. 1400 39 --
HENRY SCOGAN Moral Chaucer, c. 1407 --
JOHN WALTON, Olde poysees clerk, 1410 --
THOMAS HOCCLEVE, The disciple's commemoration, 1412 --
JOHN METHAM, Chaucer's ease, 1448 9 --
GEORGE ASHBY, Embelysshing oure englisshe, c. 1470 --
ROBERT HENRYSON, Who knows if all that worthy Chaucer wrote was true?, c. 1475 --
Inventory of Sir John Paston II, 1475 9 --
UNKNOWN, Word and thing, c. 1477 --
WILLIAM CAXTON, High and quick sentence, 1478, 1483, 1484 --
STEPHEN SURIGO, Chaucer's Epitaph, 1479 --
JOHN PARMENTER'S Will, 1479 --
WILLIAM DUNBAR, Golden eloquence, c. 1503 --
JOHN SKELTON, Some sad storyes, some mery, c. 1507 --
GAVIN DOUGLAS, Venerabill Chauser, all womanis frend, 1513 --
WILLIAM TYNDALE, To corrupt the minds of youth, 1528 --
SIR THOMAS ELYOT, A discord, 1533 --
UNKNOWN, Chaucer wrote much to do us good, c. 1540 --
SIR THOMAS WYATT, Noble scorn, c. 1540 --
An Acte, 1542 3 --
ROGER ASCHAM, Chaucer our English Homer, 1545, 1552, 1563 --
PETER ASHTON, Chaucer's words out of use, 1546 --
EDMUND BECKE, The Bible versus Canterbury Tales, 1549 --
ROBERT BRAHAM, Divine Chaucer lived in a barbarous age, 1555 --
WALTER STEVINS, Wittie Chaucer, c. 1555 --
BARNABY GOOGE, Olde Ennius, 1565 --
JOHN FOXE, Industrious and fruitfully occupied in liberal studies, 1570 --
GEORGE GASCOIGNE, Riding Rhyme, 1575 --
UNKNOWN, Classic and heavenly, c. 1575 --
MEREDITH HANMER, Good decorum observed, 1576 --
GEORGE WHETSTONE, Sir Chaucer's jests, 1578 --
EDWARD KIRKE, Loadestarre of our Language, 1579. SIR PHILIP SIDNEY, Chaucer had great wants, 1581 --
JOHN HIGINS, Quaint, 1585 --
WILLIAM WEBBE, Profitable counsel mingled with delight, 1586 --
RICHARD PUTTENHAM, The naturall of his pleasant wit, 1589 --
THOMAS NASHE, Chaucer liued vnder the tirranie of ignorance, 1589, 1952 --
SIR JOHN HARINGTON, Flat scrurrilitie, 1591 --
ROBERT GREENE , Poets wits are free, 1592 --
FRANCIS BEAUMONT, Ancient learned men in Cambridge, 1597 --
GEORGE CHAPMAN, Newe wordes, 1598 --
RICHARD VERSTEGAN, Mingler of English with French, 1605 --
RICHARD BRATHWAIT, An excellent Epanodos, 1616 --
HENRY PEACHAM, A delicate kernell of conceit and sweet invention, 1622 --
JONATHAN SIDNAM , Obsolete, c. 1630 --
BRIAN WALKER, Believed the Bible to be as true as Chaucer, 1633 --
EDWARD FOULIS, Time can silence Chaucer's tongue, 1635 --
SAMUEL PEPYS, A very fine poet, 1663, 1664 --
THOMAS SPRAT, A close, naked, natural way, 1665 --
SIR JOHN DENHAM, Morning Star, 1668 --
THOMAS RYMER, Will not speak of Chaucer, 1674 --
JOSEPH ADDISON, In vain he Jests, 1694 --
JOHN DRYDEN, God's plenty, 1700 --
ALEXANDER POPE, The pleasure of Chaucer, 1711, 1728 30 --
JOHN HUGHES, Native Strength, 1715 --
DANIEL DEFOE, Not fit for modest Persons to read, 1718 --
AMBROSE PHILLIPS , Bright images, 1720 --
JOHN DART and WILLIAM THOMAS, Thus Chaucer painted Life, 1721, 1722 --
LEONARD WELSTED, Obsolete and unintelligible, 1724 --
JOHN ENTICK --
THOMAS MORELL, No hyperbole, 1736 --
THOMAS MORELL, Noble fiction, 1737 --
ELIZABETH COOPER, Soaring in high Life, pleasant in low, 1737 --
GEORGE OGLE, Dramatic Characterisation, 1739 --
ASTROPHIL, Meer fictions for realities we take, 1740 --
THOMAS SEWARD, Gross expressions, 1750 --
SAMUEL JOHNSON, His diction was in general like that of his contemporaries, 1755, 1765. JOSEPH WARTON, Very sudden transitions from the sublime to the ridiculous, 1756, 1782 --
THOMAS GRAY, Circumstances alter, c. 1760 --
RICHARD HURD, Gothic and Neoclassical, 1762.
Series Title: Critical heritage series.

Abstract:

First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

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