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Glasgow women's suffrage movement, 1902-1933.

Author: Mitchell Library (Glasgow, Scotland),
Publisher: Wakefield, England : Microform Academic Publishers, 2014.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Summary:
"The records of the Glasgow and West of Scotland Society for Women's Suffrage cover the organisation and achievements of a non-militant suffrage society, an area of research where comparatively little work has been done. These papers on suffrage are also unusual in that they are not written from a London viewpoint and their coverage extends beyond the dissolution of many of the more militant societies in 1918. The  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Sources
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Mitchell Library (Glasgow, Scotland),
ISBN: 9781851173037 185117303X
OCLC Number: 900480557
Notes: Holder of originals: Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Executive Committee Minute Books, 1902-1933 --
Association for Womens Suffrage Letter Books, 1913-1918 --
Miscellaneous Reports with Some Publications, 1914-1933.
Other Titles: British online archives.

Abstract:

"The records of the Glasgow and West of Scotland Society for Women's Suffrage cover the organisation and achievements of a non-militant suffrage society, an area of research where comparatively little work has been done. These papers on suffrage are also unusual in that they are not written from a London viewpoint and their coverage extends beyond the dissolution of many of the more militant societies in 1918. The Glasgow Society of 1902 did have a predecessor organisation that is mentioned in the 1884 edition of 'Kirkwood's Directory of Glasgow'; however, this earlier organisation appears to have disbanded by the 1890s. The Glasgow and West of Scotland Society for Women's Suffrage was essentially a child of the Scottish Council for Women's Trades; several founder members were Scottish Council for Women's Trades' Members too: Mrs. Greig, in whose house the first meeting of the Suffrage Society was held in 1902, Drs. Alice Maclaren and Elizabeth Pace, Grace Paterson and for the first five years Margaret Irwin who served as Secretary of the Scottish Council for Women's Trades was also an influential member. The Suffrage Society met in the offices of the Council, at 58 Renfield Street, until 1909. These women were of a certain social class and this social cache enabled them to attract a succession of Liberal Lord Provosts and Town Councillors, and Members of Parliament. Glasgow has a history of women fighting for better health services, in 1876 Beatrice Clugston founded the Home for Incurables; meanwhile, in the same year, Mrs. Mary O. Higginbotham established the Glasgow Sick Poor and Private Nursing Association, to cope with the thousands living below poverty level who could afford neither hospitalisation nor basic medical care. In 1877, the Glasgow Hospital for Women was established for the medical and surgical treatment of "respectable poor women"; then in 1903, the Glasgow Women's Private Hospital (later re-named Redlands) was established by doctors from the 'Glasgow Hospital for Women' 'for the treatment of women patients by doctors of their own sex'. With such a history of female activism around the issue of hospital care, and the role of respectable women including doctors in this activism, the Society was drawn to the cause in the 1915. The Society's emphasis was upon fundraising and this was primarily conducted through a combination of flag days and whist drives. The Volunteer Exchange programme was rather less successful than the hospital fundraising efforts had been. The minute book for this particular committee is slim and committee members themselves continually questioned the need for their work. When the idea was conceived Glasgow had a history of social and medical services being run by volunteers; in light of this, the Volunteer Exchange was formed to match volunteers with projects. The scheme struggled as the nature of employment changed, in 1914 many women found paid employment for the first time and the labour exchanges were coping admirably; the volunteer exchange soon found itself to be redundant. The Glasgow Suffrage Society, like many other bodies affiliated to the NUWSS, continued its work as a Society for Equal Citizenship after the Representation of the People Act, 1918. When the Society was wound-down in 1933, it was due to financial rather than political considerations and former members continued to meet at the Queen Margaret Union in the University until the 1960s"--Collection metadata page.

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