The grammar of negation : a constraint-based approach (Book, 2000) [WorldCat.org]
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The grammar of negation : a constraint-based approach
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The grammar of negation : a constraint-based approach

Author: Jong-Bok Kim
Publisher: Stanford, Calif. : CSLI Publications, ©2000.
Series: Dissertations in linguistics.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"This book addresses three fundamental questions in the study of negation: What are the main ways of expressing sentential negation? What are the distributional properties of lexically-encoded negative elements? And, what implications do the answers to these two questions have for the theory of grammar? In answering these questions, Jong-Bok Kim investigates various aspects of negation in Korean, English, French and  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jong-Bok Kim
ISBN: 1575862298 9781575862293 1575862301 9781575862309
OCLC Number: 41355717
Description: xvi, 247 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: 1.2 Derivational vs. Non-derivational Perspectives 3 --
1.3 Organization 6 --
1.4 Theoretical Foundations of HPSG 7 --
1.4.1 Universal Grammar 8 --
1.4.2 HPSG's X'-theory 10 --
1.4.3 The Lexicon and Its Organization 14 --
1.5 Motivations for the Lexical Integrity Principle 17 --
1.5.1 Word Ordering 18 --
1.5.2 Directionality in Headedness 18 --
1.5.3 Opaqueness of Word Internal Structure to Syntactic Operations 20 --
1.5.4 Why the Lexical Integrity Principle? 23 --
2 Negation in Korean 25 --
2.2 Ways to Express Negation in Korean 26 --
2.2.1 Two Types of Negation 26 --
2.2.1.1 Preverbal Negation: Type I 26 --
2.2.1.2 Postverbal Negation: Type II 27 --
2.2.2 Basic Properties of The Two Types of Negation 27 --
2.2.2.1 Similarities 27 --
2.2.2.2 Differences 29 --
2.3 The Structure of Type I and Type II Negation: A Nonderivational Analysis 31 --
2.3.1 Type I Negation 31 --
2.3.2 Type II Negation 37 --
2.3.2.1 Arguments for the VP Structure 38 --
2.3.2.2 Arguments for the Verb Complex Analysis 39 --
2.3.3 Argument Composition in Type II Negation 44 --
2.3.3.1 Aspect Selection 46 --
2.3.3.2 NPI Licensing 48 --
2.3.3.3 Case Marking 49 --
2.3.4 Further Implications 52 --
2.3.4.1 More on Basic Properties 52 --
2.3.4.2 Double negation 53 --
2.3.4.3 Distribution of Adverbs 55 --
2.4 Review of Derivational Approaches and an Alternative Nonderivational Analysis 59 --
2.4.1 Derivation of Type I and Type II Constructions 60 --
2.4.2 Some Theoretical and Empirical Issues 62 --
2.4.2.1 On the Head Movement Constraint 62 --
2.4.2.2 Lexical Idiosyncrasies 63 --
2.4.2.3 Issues Raised by Ha-support 64 --
2.4.2.4 On the Inventory of FPs 67 --
2.4.3 Two More Arguments for the Existence of NegP 70 --
2.4.3.1 NPI Licensing 70 --
2.4.3.2 Scope of Negation and NPI Licensing in Coordination 74 --
2.4.4 An Alternative, Non-Derivational Analysis 77 --
2.4.4.1 An Adjunct Analysis for Untensed Clauses 77 --
2.4.4.2 Further Justification for the Asymmetric Approach 80 --
3 Negation in English 87 --
3.2 Basic Properties of English Not 88 --
3.2.1 Adverbial Properties 88 --
3.2.2 Properties Different from Negative Adverbs 89 --
3.3 A Non-Derivational Analysis 90 --
3.3.1 Not as a Modifier 90 --
3.3.2 Types of Adverbs 94 --
3.4 Not as a Complement 98 --
3.4.1 VP Ellipsis 98 --
3.4.2 VP Fronting 105 --
3.4.3 Scope 109 --
3.4.4 Treatment of the Periphrastic Do 113 --
3.4.4.1 A Base-Generation Approach 113 --
3.4.4.2 Comparison with a Do-support Approach 122 --
3.4.5 Negation in Auxiliary Constructions 124 --
3.4.5.1 Be Constructions 124 --
3.4.5.2 Perfective have 126 --
3.4.6 Further Discussion on the Justification of Not as a Complement 126 --
3.4.6.1 Cross-linguistic Facts 126 --
3.4.6.2 Facts in English 127 --
3.5 Comparison with Derivational Analyses 130 --
3.5.1 The Position of not 131 --
3.5.1.1 In Infinitive Clauses 131 --
3.5.1.2 In Coordination Structures 132 --
3.5.2 VP Ellipsis and Two not's 133 --
3.5.3 Adverb Placement 135 --
4 Negation in Romance Languages 139 --
4.2 Negation in French 140 --
4.2.1 Negation in Infinitival Clauses 140 --
4.2.2 Negation in Finite Clauses 142 --
4.2.3 Arguments for the Treatment of Pas as a Complement 145 --
4.2.4 Comparison with Derivational Analyses 149 --
4.2.4.1 Motivations for Verb Movement and the Theory of Pollock (1989) 149 --
4.2.4.2 Differences between British and American English 151 --
4.2.4.3 Variations in Infinitival Auxiliary Constructions 153 --
4.2.4.4 Variations in Modal Constructions 155 --
4.2.4.5 Adverb Positions 157 --
4.3 Negation in Italian (with Reference to Spanish) 163 --
4.3.1 Positions of non 163 --
4.3.2 Properties of non 165 --
4.3.2.1 Similarities with Pronominal Clitics 165 --
4.3.2.2 Differences with Pronominal Clitics 168 --
4.3.3 Analyses 170 --
4.3.4 Predictions of Analysis D 175 --
4.3.4.1 Positions of non 175 --
4.3.4.2 Clitic Climbing 176 --
4.3.4.3 AUX-to-COMP Constructions 179 --
4.3.5 Comparison with Derivational Analyses 184 --
4.3.5.1 Motivations for Verb Movement and NegP (Belletti 1990, 1994) 184 --
4.3.5.2 Positions of non 186 --
4.3.5.3 Clitic Climbing 189 --
4.3.5.4 AUX-to-COMP Constructions 191 --
4.3.5.5 Belletti's (1990) Treatment of Adverb Positions 193 --
4.3.5.6 An Alternative Analysis 197 --
4.3.5.7 Comparative Remarks 203 --
5 Concluding Remarks 209 --
5.1 Review of the Objectives of the Study 209 --
5.2 Modes of Expression 209 --
5.3 Factors Determining the Distribution of Negation 211 --
5.3.1 Morphological Negation 211 --
5.3.2 Negative Auxiliary Verb 213 --
5.3.3 Adverbial Negation 214 --
5.3.3.1 Finiteness vs. Non-finiteness 214 --
5.3.3.2 An Intrinsic Property of the Verb 216 --
5.3.4 Clitic-like Negative Verb 217 --
5.4 Consequences for the Theory of Grammar 218.
Series Title: Dissertations in linguistics.
Responsibility: Jong-Bok Kim.
More information:

Abstract:

"This book addresses three fundamental questions in the study of negation: What are the main ways of expressing sentential negation? What are the distributional properties of lexically-encoded negative elements? And, what implications do the answers to these two questions have for the theory of grammar? In answering these questions, Jong-Bok Kim investigates various aspects of negation in Korean, English, French and Italian. Addressing both empirical and theoretical issues relating to negation in these languages, he develops a nonderivational, lexicalist analysis within the constraint-based framework of Head-driven Phrase Structure Grammar. This work demonstrates that a constraint-based approach can capture the distributional possibilities of negative elements and explain related phenomena simply through their lexical properties and the interaction of the elementary morphosyntactic and valence properties of syntactic heads. The resulting constraint-based theory allows a conservative division of labor between morphology and syntax. In turn, this challenges derivational analyses that are built upon the interaction of movement operations and functional projections with an alternative that achieves broader coverage and a better level of explanation. Book jacket."--Jacket.

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