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Handbook of Crime Prevention and Community Safety

Author: Nick Tilley; Aiden Sidebottom
Publisher: Cullompton Taylor and Francis 2017
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- Notes on contributors -- Preface -- About the cover -- Abbreviations -- PART I: Theoretical perspectives on crime prevention and community safety -- 1 Theory for crime prevention -- Introduction -- Six requirements for crime prevention and community safety theories -- Specifying plausible causal mechanisms --
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Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Computer File, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Nick Tilley; Aiden Sidebottom
ISBN: 9781317530817 1317530810 9781138851054 1138851051
OCLC Number: 1021103063
Description: 1 Online-Ressource (627 Seiten)
Contents: Preface (Aiden Sidebottom and Nick Tilley)Part I: Theoretical perspectives on crime prevention and community safety1. Theories for crime prevention (Nick Tilley and Aiden Sidebottom)2. Criminology's first paradigm (Marcus Felson)3. Community Safety and Crime Prevention: A Critical Reassessment (Peter Squires)Part II: Approaches to prevention4. Developmental crime prevention (Ross Homel and Lisa Thomsen)5. Community crime prevention (Karen Bullock and Nigel Fielding)6. Seven misconceptions of situational crime prevention (Ron Clarke and Kate Bowers)7. Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations (Graham Farrell and Ken Pease)8. Beyond deterrence: Strategies of focus and fairness (David M. Kennedy, Mark A. R. Kleiman and Anthony A. Braga)9. `Forcing the plant': Desistance from crime and crime prevention (Michael Rocque, Wesley Jennings, Turgut Ozkan and Alex Piquero)Part III: Methods of prevention10. Crime prevention through product design (Paul Ekblom)11. Design, crime and the built environment (Rachel Armitage)12. Designing systems against crime: Introducing leaky systems (Aiden Sidebottom and Nick Tilley)13. Policing, procedural justice and prevention (Mike Hough, Jon Jackson and Ben Bradford)14. Regulation and crime prevention (John Eck)Part IV: Prevention in practice15. Burglary prevention in practice (Shane Johnson and Kate Bowers)16. Preventing vehicle crime (Barry Webb and Rick Brown)17. Business, crime and crime prevention: Emerging debates and future challenges (Matt Hopkins and Martin Gill)18. Organised crime (Edward Kleemans and Melvin Soudijn)19. Preventing violent crimes (Mike Maguire, Fiona Brookman and Amanda Robinson)20. Sexual crimes (Stephen Smallbone and Susan Rayment-McHugh)21. Cyber crime prevention (Matt Williams and Michael Levi)22. From fear to understanding: `Making' and managing public reactions to crime, disorder and policing (Martin Innes)Part V: The preventive process23. Analysis for intervention (Alex Hirschfield)24. Deciding what to do: Adopting a problem-oriented approach (Gloria Laycock)25. Implementation: Partnership and leverage in crime prevention (Peter Homel and Rick Brown)26. Evaluation and review for lesson learning (John Eck)

Abstract:

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- Notes on contributors -- Preface -- About the cover -- Abbreviations -- PART I: Theoretical perspectives on crime prevention and community safety -- 1 Theory for crime prevention -- Introduction -- Six requirements for crime prevention and community safety theories -- Specifying plausible causal mechanisms -- Speaking to the essential conditions for crime genesis -- Articulating the conditions for the activation or deactivation of relevant causal mechanisms -- Explicating plausible mechanisms that may produce unintended outcomes -- Crime prevention theories need to be stated in ways that make them open to empirical test -- Morally defensible and acceptable normative assumptions -- Good theory with benefits -- Doing relatively atheoretical crime prevention -- The complexity of crime prevention -- Frameworks to help navigate the complexities of crime prevention -- Problem-oriented policing/partnership -- Leverage -- Evolution -- Signal crimes -- Conclusion -- Note -- References -- 2 Criminology's first paradigm -- Introduction to the scientific paradigm -- Small steps -- Summary so far -- Pre-paradigmatic criminology -- Subfields linked to outside sciences -- Criminology's first paradigm -- Learning about crime events -- A common theory of crime events emerges -- Discussion of naming -- Specificity -- Generality -- Notes -- References -- 3 Community safety and crime prevention: a critical reassessment -- The career of a policy concept -- Community safety: tensions and limitations -- The ASBO cuckoo in the community safety nest -- Democracy, accountability or local corporatism -- Discipline, surveillance and selectivity -- Us and them -- After community safety? -- Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- PART II: Approaches to prevention

4 Developmental crime prevention -- Early intervention and risk-focused prevention -- Some 'model' early prevention programmes -- Concepts and controversies -- Jack's story -- New directions -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- References -- 5 Community crime prevention -- Background -- This chapter -- The development of community crime prevention -- Promoting effectiveness -- Promoting legitimacy -- The principles of community crime prevention -- Informal social control -- Opportunity reduction -- The practices of community crime prevention -- Neighbourhood Watch -- Community policing -- Implementing community crime prevention -- Mobilising citizens and communities -- Mobilising the police -- The outcomes of community crime prevention -- Establishing outcomes -- The effectiveness of Neighbourhood Watch -- The effectiveness of community policing -- Conclusion -- References -- 6 Seven misconceptions of situational crime prevention -- Introduction -- Situational prevention is simplistic and atheoretical -- The role of opportunity in crime -- The role of excuses and provocations -- Summary -- Situational prevention has not been shown to work -- it displaces crime and often makes it worse -- Displacement and escalation -- Diffusion of benefits and anticipatory benefits -- Adaptation -- Evaluation strategies -- Situational prevention diverts attention from the root causes of crime -- Situational prevention is a conservative, managerial approach to crime -- Situational prevention promotes a selfish, exclusionary society -- The poor will suffer -- Gated communities -- Exclusion -- SCP promotes Big Brother and restricts personal freedoms -- Situational prevention blames the victim -- Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 7 Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations -- Introduction -- New technology crimes -- Near repeats - hotspots and hot products

Explaining crime concentrations: FBI theory -- Where, when, how, and why to prevent repeats -- Does it work? -- What works? What doesn't? -- Tricky issues -- Conclusion -- Note -- References -- 8 Beyond deterrence: strategies of focus and fairness -- Introduction -- "Focused deterrence" as a partial misnomer -- Small numbers of standout offenders -- Collective dynamics -- Narrowly defined public safety goals -- Create certainty and swiftness -- Mobilize informal social control -- Mobilize outreach and support -- Model procedural justice and legitimacy -- Direct communication -- Current interventions -- The program evaluation record -- More recent evidence -- Other interventions -- Conclusion -- References -- 9 "Forcing the plant": desistance from crime and crime prevention -- Introduction -- Desistance defined -- Desistance research: a brief overview -- What do we know about desistance? -- Timing -- Quantitative and qualitative approaches -- Correlates of desistance -- The meaning of desistance -- Lessons from research on trajectories of offending -- Theories of desistance -- Biological/pure age -- Psychological/psychosocial -- Psychosocial maturity/personality theories -- Cognitive/identity perspectives -- Social process theories -- Social bonds -- Peers and citizenship -- Applying desistance to crime prevention -- Approaches to facilitating normal development -- Implications of current criminal justice approaches -- Implications of desistance for crime prevention and rehabilitation -- Conclusion -- References -- PART III: Methods of prevention -- 10 Crime prevention through product design -- Introduction -- The challenges of designing products against crime -- Trade-offs and conflicts -- Intelligent replication and flexibility -- Crime harvests -- Coping with socio-technological change, adaptive offenders and arms races

Responding to the challenges of product design -- Design processes -- Handling conflicts and trade-offs -- Reframing -- Visualisation -- Crime science - content -- Risk and risk factors associated with products -- Causes and interventions -- The security function framework -- Crime science - process -- The 5Is framework -- Involvement -- Motivating designers and manufacturers -- Impact - evaluation of products designed against crime -- Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 11 Design, crime and the built environment -- Introduction -- What is Crime Prevention through Environmental Design? -- The principles of CPTED -- Defensible space and territoriality -- Limiting through movement -- Surveillance -- Physical security -- Image/management and maintenance -- CPTED in practice -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 12 Designing systems against crime: introducing leaky systems -- Introduction -- How systems unintentionally create crime -- Systems can furnish rewards for crime -- Systems can make crime easy -- Systems can make crime less risky -- Systems can facilitate crime planning -- Systems can disinhibit and provoke crime -- Systems can generate need -- Systems can create crime networks -- Systems can teach crime -- Systems can legitimatise crime -- How systems intentionally reduce crime -- Systems can make crime more risky -- Systems can make crime more difficult -- Systems can make crime less rewarding -- Systems can reduce crime provocation -- Systems can remind potential offenders of rules -- Systems can deny resources for crime -- Variations and concentrations: on the distribution of online romance frauds across dating websites -- Data -- Results -- The relationship between leaky systems, places and other types of crime concentration -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- References -- 13 Policing, procedural justice and prevention

Introduction -- Theories of normative compliance -- Procedural justice theory -- Types of fairness -- Explaining the legitimating power of procedural justice: social identity -- Procedural justice and policing styles -- The asymmetrical impact of good and bad experiences with the police -- Testing a legitimacy model of compliance: the European Social Survey -- Practical and ethical considerations -- Ethical issues -- Notes -- References -- 14 Regulation to prevent crime -- Introduction -- Paths to regulation for crime prevention -- The path from crime problems and explanations -- Routine Activity Theory and super controllers -- Crime scripts and processes -- Choices and incentives -- The crime as pollution thesis -- The path from governance and regulatory administration -- The two paths converge -- Forms of gatekeeper regulation -- Means based instruments -- Command and control -- Subsidies -- Ends based instruments -- Legal liability -- Fees, taxes, and fines -- Subsidies -- Tradeable permits -- Choosing the right instrument -- Potential problems with a regulatory approach -- Private costs - reducing excessive burdens -- The regulator's dilemma -- Insufficient evidence of efficacy -- The compliance trap -- Tertiary costs - reducing burdens on fourth parties -- Increasing crime concentration -- Collateral damage -- Principles of effective gatekeeper regulation to prevent crime -- Conclusions -- Note -- References -- PART IV: Prevention in practice -- 15 Burglary prevention in practice -- Introduction -- The problem of burglary and burglary risk factors -- Distinguishing different types of burglary problem -- The role of interactions -- Preventing burglary in practice -- Comprehensiveness of evidence base -- What is the coverage of different types of evidence? -- Effect -- Mechanisms -- Moderators -- Implementation -- Economics

Using Table 15.1 in burglary reduction practice

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"Tilley and Sidebottom's second edition Handbook is a must-read for all those who seek to prevent crime and enhance community safety. Bringing together 43 of the world's best scholars writing 27 Read more...

 
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