Haunted historiographies : the rhetoric of ideology in postcolonial Irish fiction (eBook, 2016) [WorldCat.org]
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Haunted historiographies : the rhetoric of ideology in postcolonial Irish fiction
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Haunted historiographies : the rhetoric of ideology in postcolonial Irish fiction

Author: Matthew Schultz, (Professor of English)
Publisher: Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2016.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Matthew Schultz maps rhetorical hauntings across a wide range of postcolonial Irish novels, and defines the spectre as a non-present presence that simultaneously symbolises and analyses an overlapping of Irish myth and Irish history.
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Print version :
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Matthew Schultz, (Professor of English)
ISBN: 9781526111197 1526111195 9781526111180 1526111187 1781707227 9781781707227
OCLC Number: 1100901903
Language Note: In English.
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Haunted historiographies: The rhetoric of ideology in postcolonial Irish fiction; Half Title Page; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Dedication; Acknowledgements; Introduction:Textual spectrality and Finnegans Wake; Part I: Famine; 1. The persistence of Famine in postcolonial Ireland; 2. The specter of Famine during World War II; Part II: Revolution; 3. Ancient warriors, modernsexualities: Easter 1916 and the advent of post-Catholic Ireland; 4. Gothic inheritance and the Troubles in contemporary Irish fiction; Conclusion: Famine and the Western Front in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot
Responsibility: Matthew Schultz.

Abstract:

Matthew Schultz maps rhetorical hauntings across a wide range of postcolonial Irish novels, and defines the spectre as a non-present presence that simultaneously symbolises and analyses an  Read more...

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'This is a generally well-informed study that makes ingenious use of the spectral in relation to a range of diverse texts.'Emer Nolan, Maynooth University, James Joyce Quarterly, Volume 52, Number 1, Read more...

 
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