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Hematopoietic Progenitor and Stem Cell Regulation during Development: Hypoxia and Niches

Author: Parisa Imanirad
Publisher: Erasmus University Rotterdam 2013-02-12
Edition/Format: Book Book : English
Summary:
In a healthy adult person, almost 1011- 1012 new blood cells are generated daily in order tomaintain the steady state in peripheral circulation (Paul, 2008). To this end, a high level ofself-renewal and differentiation of Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is required. HSCs havethe unique ability of self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool. They also differentiate tomore committed progenitors which produce all  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Parisa Imanirad
ISBN: 978-94-6203-283-5
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 6892888193
Awards:

Abstract:

In a healthy adult person, almost 1011- 1012 new blood cells are generated daily in order tomaintain the steady state in peripheral circulation (Paul, 2008). To this end, a high level ofself-renewal and differentiation of Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is required. HSCs havethe unique ability of self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool. They also differentiate tomore committed progenitors which produce all mature blood cell lineages (Lemischka, 1992;Medvinsky and Dzierzak, 1998; Orkin, 2000). In general, there are two main branches in theadult hematopoietic hierarchy: The lymphoid branch is derived from common lymphoidprogenitors that mature to B-cells and T-cells. Lymphocytes are involved in the adaptiveimmune system. The myeloid branch is derived from common myeloid progenitor cells thatgive rise to more lineage-restricted precursors. These progenitors differentiate into thefollowing cell types: erythrocytes, the most abundant terminally differentiated cells in theblood, which are required for oxygen transport, as well as megakaryocytes, involved in bloodclotting and granulocytes and macrophages, which are involved in innate immunity.Recent insights into understanding HSC regulation have facilitated HSC clinical therapiesand trials for hematological disorders. Despite progress in this field, there remain difficultiesin ex vivo expansion of HSCs on a scale that ensures efficient regeneration of blood system.Overcoming this challenge calls for a more information on the intrinsic and extrinsic factorsthat regulate development, maintenance, and function of HSCs.

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