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History of RAND's random digits : summary

Author: George W Brown; Rand Corporation.
Publisher: Santa Monica, Calif. : RAND Corporation, [1949]
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Experimental probability problems, in connection with a diversity of applications, led to a desire for a large supply of random digits, of sufficiently high quality so that the user wouldn't have to question whether they were good enough for his particular application in the case of every different application. A random frequency pulse source was gated by a constant frequency pulse, about once a second, providing on  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: George W Brown; Rand Corporation.
OCLC Number: 1105932215
Notes: Cover title.
"P-113."
"June 1949."
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. Santa Monica, CA : RAND Corporation. Available via World Wide Web.
Description: 1 online resource (5 pages)
Responsibility: George W. Brown.

Abstract:

Experimental probability problems, in connection with a diversity of applications, led to a desire for a large supply of random digits, of sufficiently high quality so that the user wouldn't have to question whether they were good enough for his particular application in the case of every different application. A random frequency pulse source was gated by a constant frequency pulse, about once a second, providing on the average about 100,000 pulses in one second. Pulse standardization circuits passed the pulses to a five place binary counter, so that in principle the machine is like a roulette wheel with 32 positions, making on the average about 3000 revolutions on each turn. A binary to decimal conversion was used, throwing away 12 of the 32 positions, and the resulting random digit was fed to an I.B.M. punch, yielding punched card tables of random digits. A detailed analysis of the randomness to be expected from such a machine was made by the designers and indicated that the machine should yield very high quality output. (Author).

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