skip to content
A history of steamboating on the Upper Missouri River. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

A history of steamboating on the Upper Missouri River.

Author: William E Lass
Publisher: Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press [1962]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In 1959, a groundbreaking study of nonverbal communication, The Silent Language, was published to international acclaim. Written by Edward T. Hall, a cultural anthropologist, it was one of the first books to examine the complex ways people communicate with one another without speaking. More than thirty years later, The Silent Language has never been out of print, has been translated into several languages, has sold  Read more...
Rating:

based on 1 rating(s) 1 with a review

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Lass, William E.
History of steamboating on the Upper Missouri River.
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [1962]
(OCoLC)614462272
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William E Lass
ISBN: 0803201001 9780803201002
OCLC Number: 1089383
Description: 215 pages illustrations 24 cm
Contents: The Missouri River --
The extension of steamboating from St. Louis to Fort Benton --
The expansion of steamboating on the Upper Missouri, 1861-1864 --
The peak of St. Louis dominance of trade on the Upper Missouri, 1865-1869 --
Sioux City replaces St. Louis as headquarters from Upper Missouri navigators --
The rise of steamboat ports above Sioux City, 1873 --
Yankton-Bismarck steamboat men --
Yankton and Bismarck as steamboat ports, 1873-1879 --
Bismarck as the last important steamboat port on the Upper Missouri River, 1880-1885 --
The last years of commercial navigation on the Upper Missouri, 1885-1936 --
The role of the federal government in Upper Missouri steamboating.
Other Titles: Steamboating on the Upper Missouri River.
More information:

Abstract:

In 1959, a groundbreaking study of nonverbal communication, The Silent Language, was published to international acclaim. Written by Edward T. Hall, a cultural anthropologist, it was one of the first books to examine the complex ways people communicate with one another without speaking. More than thirty years later, The Silent Language has never been out of print, has been translated into several languages, has sold more than 1.5 million copies in the U.S., and remains the definitive book in its field. Today, Ned Hall is a world-renowned expert in intercultural communication, sought after by government agencies, businesses and universities throughout the world for his expertise in interpreting the hidden meanings behind what people are saying to one another. Now, in a remarkably candid and personal book, he tells the story of the first fifty years of his fascinating life. Although it began inauspiciously when he was virtually abandoned by his parents to the care of others, his early exposure to diverse cultures started him on his path toward decoding the deeper, hidden layers of human behavior. By the time he was in his early twenties, he had lived in Missouri, New Mexico, France, Germany and on Indian reservations in the Southwest. Building dams with the Hopi and Navajo, he began to realize the very deep differences in these two dissimilar cultures and our own as to how each viewed time, space, bargains and other aspects of daily communication. While serving in the army during World War II, he perceived how the formal army culture differed from the informal one, adding further weight to the new theories he was developing. Working for the State Department under President Truman, he trained foreign service officers who were being sent to underdeveloped countries. Hall's message to them--that there were profound disparities in the attitudes of different cultures toward time, space and relationships--was considered almost heretical at the time. Today, Hall's books are required reading for the Peace Corps. With charm, warmth, and wit, Ned Hall tells of years filled with adventure, glory, pain and disappointment, discovery and achievement. Throughout his life and in the pages of his autobiography, he incorporates his belief that decoding hidden meanings will help people to discover "the anthropology of everyday life."

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

WorldCat User Reviews (1)

Ships mentioned in this book are listed at ShipIndex.org

by ShipIndex (WorldCat user published 2009-09-01) Good Permalink

Note to researchers: The vessels mentioned in this book's index are included in the freely-accessible online database at http://ShipIndex.org. Use that site to explore more than 100,000 ship references from this and dozens of other books, journals, databases, and more. You'll find useful links back...
Read more...  Read more...

  • 1 of 1 people found this review helpful. Did it help you? 
  •   
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(5)

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1089383> # A history of steamboating on the Upper Missouri River.
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book ;
   library:oclcnum "1089383" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/nbu> ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#Place/lincoln> ; # Lincoln
   rdfs:seeAlso <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#CreativeWork/steamboating_on_the_upper_missouri_river> ; # Steamboating on the Upper Missouri River.
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1132384> ; # Steam-navigation
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#Place/missouri_fluss> ; # Missouri (Fluss)
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1240244> ; # Missouri River.
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#Topic/steam_navigation_missouri_river> ; # Steam-navigation--Missouri River
   schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/386.30977/> ;
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#Topic/binnenschifffahrt> ; # Binnenschifffahrt
   schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
   schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/28378105> ; # William E. Lass
   schema:datePublished "1962" ;
   schema:description "In 1959, a groundbreaking study of nonverbal communication, The Silent Language, was published to international acclaim. Written by Edward T. Hall, a cultural anthropologist, it was one of the first books to examine the complex ways people communicate with one another without speaking. More than thirty years later, The Silent Language has never been out of print, has been translated into several languages, has sold more than 1.5 million copies in the U.S., and remains the definitive book in its field. Today, Ned Hall is a world-renowned expert in intercultural communication, sought after by government agencies, businesses and universities throughout the world for his expertise in interpreting the hidden meanings behind what people are saying to one another. Now, in a remarkably candid and personal book, he tells the story of the first fifty years of his fascinating life. Although it began inauspiciously when he was virtually abandoned by his parents to the care of others, his early exposure to diverse cultures started him on his path toward decoding the deeper, hidden layers of human behavior. By the time he was in his early twenties, he had lived in Missouri, New Mexico, France, Germany and on Indian reservations in the Southwest. Building dams with the Hopi and Navajo, he began to realize the very deep differences in these two dissimilar cultures and our own as to how each viewed time, space, bargains and other aspects of daily communication. While serving in the army during World War II, he perceived how the formal army culture differed from the informal one, adding further weight to the new theories he was developing. Working for the State Department under President Truman, he trained foreign service officers who were being sent to underdeveloped countries. Hall's message to them--that there were profound disparities in the attitudes of different cultures toward time, space and relationships--was considered almost heretical at the time. Today, Hall's books are required reading for the Peace Corps. With charm, warmth, and wit, Ned Hall tells of years filled with adventure, glory, pain and disappointment, discovery and achievement. Throughout his life and in the pages of his autobiography, he incorporates his belief that decoding hidden meanings will help people to discover "the anthropology of everyday life.""@en ;
   schema:description "The Missouri River -- The extension of steamboating from St. Louis to Fort Benton -- The expansion of steamboating on the Upper Missouri, 1861-1864 -- The peak of St. Louis dominance of trade on the Upper Missouri, 1865-1869 -- Sioux City replaces St. Louis as headquarters from Upper Missouri navigators -- The rise of steamboat ports above Sioux City, 1873 -- Yankton-Bismarck steamboat men -- Yankton and Bismarck as steamboat ports, 1873-1879 -- Bismarck as the last important steamboat port on the Upper Missouri River, 1880-1885 -- The last years of commercial navigation on the Upper Missouri, 1885-1936 -- The role of the federal government in Upper Missouri steamboating."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/2058892> ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:isSimilarTo <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/614462272> ;
   schema:name "A history of steamboating on the Upper Missouri River."@en ;
   schema:productID "1089383" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1089383#PublicationEvent/lincoln_university_of_nebraska_press1962> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#Agent/university_of_nebraska_press> ; # University of Nebraska Press
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780803201002> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1089383> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#Agent/university_of_nebraska_press> # University of Nebraska Press
    a bgn:Agent ;
   schema:name "University of Nebraska Press" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2058892#CreativeWork/steamboating_on_the_upper_missouri_river> # Steamboating on the Upper Missouri River.
    a schema:CreativeWork ;
   schema:name "Steamboating on the Upper Missouri River." ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1132384> # Steam-navigation
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Steam-navigation"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1240244> # Missouri River.
    a schema:Place ;
   schema:name "Missouri River." ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/28378105> # William E. Lass
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Lass" ;
   schema:givenName "William E." ;
   schema:name "William E. Lass" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780803201002>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "0803201001" ;
   schema:isbn "9780803201002" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/614462272>
    a schema:CreativeWork ;
   rdfs:label "History of steamboating on the Upper Missouri River." ;
   schema:description "Online version:" ;
   schema:isSimilarTo <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1089383> ; # A history of steamboating on the Upper Missouri River.
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.