How the gospels became history : Jesus and Mediterranean myths (eBook, 2019) [WorldCat.org]
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How the gospels became history : Jesus and Mediterranean myths

Author: M David Litwa
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2019]
Series: Synkrisis.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
A compelling comparison of the gospels and Greco-Roman mythology which shows that the gospels were not perceived as myths, but as historical records Did the early Christians believe their myths? Like most ancient--and modern--people, early Christians made efforts to present their myths in the most believable ways. In this eye-opening work, M. David Litwa explores how and why what later became the four canonical  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Litwa, M. David.
How the Gospels became history.
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2019]
(DLC) 2018964308
(OCoLC)1089495118
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: M David Litwa
ISBN: 9780300249484 0300249489
OCLC Number: 1111801550
Description: 1 online resource (ix, 298 pages)
Contents: Frontmatter --
CONTENTS --
Introduction. The Gospels, Mythography, and Historiography --
Chapter One. Jesus Myth Theory --
Chapter Two. A Theory of Comparison --
Chapter Three. Incarnation --
Chapter Four. Genealogy --
Chapter Five. Divine Conception --
Chapter Six. Dream Visions and Prophecies --
Chapter Seven. Magi and the Star --
Chapter Eight. Child in Danger, Child of Wonder --
Chapter Nine. The Righteous Lawgiver --
Chapter Ten. Miracles --
Chapter Eleven. The Pharmakos --
Chapter Twelve. Empty Tombs and Translation --
Chapter Thirteen Disappearance and Recognition --
Chapter Fourteen. Ascent --
Chapter Fifteen. Eyewitnesses --
Conclusion. The Myth of Historicity --
Notes --
Index of Subjects --
Index of Modern Authors --
Index of Ancient Sources
Series Title: Synkrisis.
Other Titles: Jesus and Mediterranean myths
Responsibility: M. David Litwa.
More information:

Abstract:

A compelling comparison of the gospels and Greco-Roman mythology which shows that the gospels were not perceived as myths, but as historical records Did the early Christians believe their myths? Like most ancient--and modern--people, early Christians made efforts to present their myths in the most believable ways. In this eye-opening work, M. David Litwa explores how and why what later became the four canonical gospels take on a historical cast that remains vitally important for many Christians today. Offering an in-depth comparison with other Greco-Roman stories that have been shaped to seem like history, Litwa shows how the evangelists responded to the pressures of Greco-Roman literary culture by using well-known historiographical tropes such as the mention of famous rulers and kings, geographical notices, the introduction of eyewitnesses, vivid presentation, alternative reports, and so on. In this way, the evangelists deliberately shaped myths about Jesus into historical discourse to maximize their believability for ancient audiences.

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"Litwa offers a philosophically sophisticated yet immanently accessible explanation of the relationship between history and myth in the early Christian gospels."-Clare K. Rothschild, author of Paul Read more...

 
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