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How to build a great screenplay : a master class in storytelling for film

Author: David Howard
Publisher: New York : St. Martin's Griffin, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st St. Martin's Griffin edView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Acclaimed University of Southern California screenwriting teacher David Howard has guided hundreds of students to careers in writing for film and television. Drawing on decades of practical experience and savvy, How to Build a Great Screenplay deconstructs the craft of screenwriting, and carefully reveals how to build a good story from the ground up. Howard eschews the "system" offered by other books, emphasizing  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Howard
ISBN: 0312252110 9780312252113 031235262X 9780312352622
OCLC Number: 977721093
Description: xvi, 445 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Story and Storytelling --
The Story --
The Chronology of Events --
A Crucial Paradox --
Life Is What Happens --
The World of the Story --
Collisions --
Where's the Antagonist? --
Characters' Baggage and Unfinished Business --
Lightning, Decisions, and Protagonists --
Character Arc --
What If This Story Were a Fairy Tale or Myth? --
The Audience's Fragile Involvement --
The Telling of the Story --
The Seamless Dream --
The Intended Impact --
Camera as Storyteller --
Genre, Style, and Tone --
Separation of Experience and Knowledge --
Hope versus Fear: The Creation of Tension --
The "Game" of Storytelling --
Building Stories --
The Creation of Drama --
Main Character or Ensemble Story? --
Protagonist and the Creation of Story --
Worthy Antagonist --
Supportive and Reflective Characters --
Tension from First to Last --
Actions and Goals --
Character Arc --
Pivotal Decisions --
Time Compression and Intensity --
The Possible and the Impossible --
Building from the Ground Up --
Main Character's Passion --
Objective and Subjective Drama --
Theme --
Backstory --
What's at Stake? --
Six Types of Characters --
Carpentry and Craftsmanship --
Creating the Audience's Experience --
Immediacy and the Sense of Here and Now --
Exposition --
Rising Action --
Point of No Return --
Willing Suspension of Disbelief --
Demonstration versus Explanation --
Number of Clearly Definable Characters --
Character Motivations --
Subtext --
Recapitulations --
Dealing with Coincidence --
Creating Living Characters --
Inner Life and Character Attitude --
Protagonist and Antagonist --
Secondary Characters --
Underlying Motives --
Time and Storytelling --
Screen Time and Drama --
Time and Complexity --
Action Time --
Amount of Story and Screen Time --
Real Time versus Screen Time versus Time Frame --
The Simplest Use of Time --
Why Alter Simple Chronology? --
Time and the Lives of the Characters --
Objective Time and Subjective Time --
Basic Dramatic Structure --
What Is Drama? --
The Three Acts --
The Beginning: Engaging the Audience --
The Middle: Elaborating and Extending the Engagement --
The End: Releasing the Engagement --
The Writer's Relationship to the Acts --
Sequences --
From Acts to Sequences --
The Elements of a Sequence --
Special Needs of the First Sequence --
Pretitle Sequences and Codas --
Crucial Moments --
Crucial Moments in the Main Character's Life --
Crucial Moments in the Telling of the Story --
Subplots --
The Role of Subplots --
Subplot Characters --
Beginning, Middle, and End --
Resolution of Subplots and Main Plot --
How to Weave in Subplots --
The Classical Screenplay Structure --
Main Character's Undisturbed Status Quo --
Creating the Dilemma --
Elaborating on the Dilemma and the World of the Story --
First Potential Breakthrough --
Main Subplot and Main Character --
Greatest Exertion --
False Resolution --
Final Test of Character and True Resolution --
Typical Placements and Proportions --
Relationships of Midpoint, Culmination, and Resolution --
Where Does "Climax" Fit In? --
Beyond Classical Dramatic Structure --
The Single Unbreakable Rule of Drama --
Anything But Classical Screenplay Structure --
Being Different --
Breaking the Form --
Storyteller Intentions and Priorities --
The Limits of Classical, the Beginnings of Revolutionary --
Are All "Revolutionary" Films Revolutionary? --
Mainstream Experiments in Storytelling --
A Few Lessons from Past Experiments --
Storytelling Myths, Legends, and Lies --
How to Shake Up Classical Structure-and Why --
Why Some Stories Can't Be Classically Told --
The Physics of Drama --
How to Stir the Pot --
Cost-Benefit Analyses with Rule-Breaking --
Using the Rules to Break the Rules --
Clarity and Obscurity --
Writing and Work Strategies --
Before the First Draft --
What Keeps the Audience in Their Seats --
Consider the Audience's Position --
The First Draft --
The Sequence Breakdown --
The Step Outline --
Writing the First Draft --
After the First Draft --
Clarifying Your Theme --
Rewriting --
Know Your Long Suit and Short Suit --
Dramatic Instincts.
Other Titles: How to build a screenplay
Responsibility: David Howard.
More information:

Abstract:

Deconstructs the craft of writing for film, and reveals: story arc; plotting and subplotting; classical vs revolutionary screenplay structure; tone, style and atmosphere; the use of time; and the  Read more...

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"How to Build a Great Screenplay" is insightful, riveting, clear, concise and to the point. It's a screenwriter's screenwriting book packed with practical as well as theoretical insights. If you're Read more...

 
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