How we know what isn't so (eBook, 2014) [WorldCat.org]
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How we know what isn't so
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How we know what isn't so

Author: Thomas Gilovich
Publisher: [Place of publication not identified] : Free Press, 2014.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Thomas Gilovich offers a wise and readable guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life. When can we trust what we believe'that "teams and players have winning streaks," that "flattery works," or that "the more people who agree, the more likely they are to be right"'and when are such beliefs suspect' Thomas Gilovich offers a guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life. Illustrating his points with  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Gilovich
ISBN: 9781439106747 1439106746
OCLC Number: 893161891
Notes: Title from resource description page (Recorded Books, viewed October 13, 2014).
Description: 1 online resource
Responsibility: Thomas Gilovich.

Abstract:

Thomas Gilovich offers a wise and readable guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life. When can we trust what we believe'that "teams and players have winning streaks," that "flattery works," or that "the more people who agree, the more likely they are to be right"'and when are such beliefs suspect' Thomas Gilovich offers a guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life. Illustrating his points with examples, and supporting them with the latest research findings, he documents the cognitive, social, and motivational processes that distort our thoughts, beliefs, judgments and decisions. In a rapidly changing world, the biases and stereotypes that help us process an overload of complex information inevitably distort what we would like to believe is reality. Awareness of our propensity to make these systematic errors, Gilovich argues, is the first step to more effective analysis and action.

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