Humanesis : sound and technological posthumanism (eBook, 2013) [WorldCat.org]
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Humanesis : sound and technological posthumanism
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Humanesis : sound and technological posthumanism

Author: David Cecchetto
Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [2013]
Series: Posthumanities, 25
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Humanesis critically examines central strains of posthumanism, searching out biases in the ways that human-technology coupling is explained. Specifically, it interrogates three approaches taken by posthumanist discourse: scientific, humanist, and organismic. David Cecchetto's investigations reveal how each perspective continues to hold on to elements of the humanist tradition that it is ostensibly mobilized  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Document, Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: David Cecchetto
ISBN: 9780816676446 0816676445 9780816679638 0816679630
OCLC Number: 1228577245
Description: 1 online resource (vii, 210 pages :) illustrations.
Contents: 1. From Genes to Memes: Ollivier Dyens and the Scientific Posthumanism of Darwinian Evolution --
2. Dark Matters: An Eidolic Collision of Sound and Vision --
3. N. Katherine Hayles and Humanist Technological Posthumanism --
4. Tlie Trace: Melancholy and Posthuman Ethics --
5. From Affect to Affectivity: Mark B.N. Hansen's Organismic Posthumanism --
6. Skewed Remote Musical Performance: Sounding Deconstruction --
Conclusion: Registration as Intervention: Performativity and Dominant Strains of Technological Posthumanism.
Series Title: Posthumanities, 25
Responsibility: David Cecchetto.

Abstract:

"Humanesis critically examines central strains of posthumanism, searching out biases in the ways that human-technology coupling is explained. Specifically, it interrogates three approaches taken by posthumanist discourse: scientific, humanist, and organismic. David Cecchetto's investigations reveal how each perspective continues to hold on to elements of the humanist tradition that it is ostensibly mobilized against. His study frontally desublimates the previously unseen presumptions that underlie each of the three thought lines and offers incisive appraisals of the work of three prominent thinkers: Ollivier Dyens, Katherine Hayles, and Mark Hansen. To materially ground the problematic of posthumanism, Humanesis interweaves its theoretical chapters with discussions of artworks. These highlight the topos of sound, demonstrating how aurality might produce new insights in a field that has been dominated by visualization. Cecchetto, a media artist, scrutinizes his own collaborative artistic practice in which he elucidates the variegated causal chains that compose human-technological coupling. Humanesis advances the posthumanist conversation in several important ways. It proposes the term "technological posthumanism" to focus on the discourse as it relates to technology without neglecting its other disciplinary histories. It suggests that deconstruction remains relevant to the enterprise, especially with respect to the performative dimension of language. It analyzes artworks not yet considered in the light of posthumanism, with a particular emphasis on the role of aurality. And the form of the text introduces a reflexive component that exemplifies how the dialogue of posthumanism might progress without resorting to the types of unilateral narratives that the book critiques. "--

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