The humble cosmopolitan : rights, diversity, and trans-state democracy (Book, 2020) [WorldCat.org]
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The humble cosmopolitan : rights, diversity, and trans-state democracy
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The humble cosmopolitan : rights, diversity, and trans-state democracy

Author: Luis Cabrera
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2020]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Cosmopolitanism is said by many critics to be arrogant. In emphasizing universal principles and granting no fundamental moral significance to national or other group belonging, it wrongly treats those making non-universalist claims as not authorized to speak, while treating those in non-Western societies as not qualified. This book works to address such objections. It does so in part by engaging the work of B.R.  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Cabrera, Luis, 1966-
The humble cosmopolitan
New York : Oxford University Press, 2020.
(DLC) 2019034418
Named Person: B R Ambedkar; B R Ambedkar; Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Luis Cabrera
ISBN: 9780190869502 019086950X 9780190869519 0190869518
OCLC Number: 1114047140
Awards: Winner of Honorable Mention from the International Studies Association International Ethics Section Best Book Award.
Description: xix, 340 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: Introduction: Claims of cosmopolitan arrogance and humility --
Configuring cosmopolitan humility --
Addressing claims of cosmopolitan arrogance --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: Luis Cabrera.

Abstract:

"Cosmopolitanism is said by many critics to be arrogant. In emphasizing universal principles and granting no fundamental moral significance to national or other group belonging, it wrongly treats those making non-universalist claims as not authorized to speak, while treating those in non-Western societies as not qualified. This book works to address such objections. It does so in part by engaging the work of B.R. Ambedkar, architect of India's 1950 Constitution and revered champion of the country's Dalits (formerly "untouchables"). Ambedkar cited universal principles of equality and rights in confronting domestic exclusions and the "arrogance" of caste. He sought to advance forms of political humility, or the affirmation of equal standing within political institutions and openness to input and challenge within them. This book examines how an "institutional global citizenship" approach to cosmopolitanism could similarly advance political humility, in supporting the development of input and challenge mechanisms beyond the state. It employs a grounded normative theory method, taking insights for the model from field research among Dalit activists pressing for domestic reforms through the UN human rights regime, and from their critics in the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party. Insights also are taken from Turkish protesters challenging a rising domestic authoritarianism, and from UK Independence Party members demanding "Brexit" from the European Union-in part because of possibilities that predominantly Muslim Turkey will join. Overall, it is shown, an appropriately configured institutional cosmopolitanism should orient fundamentally to political humility rather than arrogance, while holding significant potential for advancing global rights protections and more equitable rights specifications"--

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In the face of rising populist authoritarianism in various parts of the globe, Luis Cabreras important new book forcefully argues for renewed attention to the project of extending rights-based Read more...

 
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