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Humes A Treatise of Human Nature.

Author: Wright, John P.
Publisher: Cambridge University Press 2009.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40) presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic resource
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Wright, John P.
OCLC Number: 741249914
Description: 1 online resource (316)
Contents: Cover --
Half-title --
Series-Title --
Title --
Copyright --
Dedication13; --
Contents --
Preface --
Acknowledgments --
Abbreviations --
WorKs BY Hume --
Works By Other Writers --
Chapter 1 The author and the book --
1. Reflections on the road from London to Bristol --
2. Stoic reflections, a 8220;new Scene of Thought8221; and the 8220;Disease of the Learned8221; --
3. Formal education and self-education --
4. Humes early writing --
5. Bristol and the advice of the physician --
6 Humes 8220;retreat8221; in France and the writing of the treatise --
7. Hume in london: revision and publication of books 1 and 2 --
8. Return to Scotland: hutchesons criticisms and the revision of book 3 --
9. The 8216;failure of the treatise and the task of a modern reader --
Chapter 2 First principles --
1. Humes foundational project: contrast with that of descartes --
2. Humes conception of philosophy and its methods --
3. The association of ideas --
4. Causes of association: imagination, brain traces, and the mind/body union --
5. Perceptions and external objects: humes indirect realism --
6. Impressions and ideas --
i) Impressions --
ii) Ideas --
7. Simplicity and complexity --
8. Ideas as copies of impressions: the copy principle --
9. Reason: philosophical relations and separations --
i) Reasoning and philosophical relations --
ii) The separability principle: conceptual possibility --
iii) Separation of perceptions themselves and the solid principle --
10. Conclusion: imagination and humes science of human nature --
Chapter 3 Causation --
1. 8220;Of knowledge and probability8221; --
i) Knowledge and insight --
ii) Probability --
iii) Humes notion of reasoning in general --
2. Preliminary examination of the impression of causation --
3. The causal maxim and Humes rejection of indeterminacy in nature --
4. The inference from the observed to the unobserved --
i) 8216;Experience and the nature of Humes problem of induction --
ii) The inference from the observed to the unobserved is not based on reason --
iii) Custom and association are the cause of the inference: Humes critique of Locke --
iv) Reasoning about causes --
5. Belief --
i) The nature of belief --
ii) The causes of belief: mental mechanisms --
iii) The effects of belief --
6. The subjective origin of the idea of necessary connection --
i) The impression of necessity --
ii) Humes two definitions of cause: defining causation in terms of regularity of objects or the determination of the mind --
7. Skepticism concerning causation --
8. The natural supposition of objective necessity --
i) Projection --
ii) The natural supposition of inseparability --
9. Conclusion: humes rejection of occasionalism, and the inadequacy of our ideas --
Chapter 4 Skepticism --
1. 8220;Of scepticism with regard to reason8221; --
2. 8220;Of scepticism with regard to the senses8221; --
i) The roots of skepticism with regard to the senses: 8220;a few ... experiments8221; --
ii) We have no legitimate idea of body --
iii) Constancy and coherence --
iv) Imagination as the source of belief in body: coherence and the mental inertia principle --
v) Imagination as the source of belief in body: coherence and the identity substitution principle --
vi) The primacy of common sense belief: it is not a 8220;natural belief 82.

Abstract:

David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40) presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, as well as his arguments showing why we are nevertheless psychologically compelled to accept such beliefs. The book will be a valuable guide for those seeking to understand the nature of modern skepticism and its connection with the founding of the human sciences during the Enlightenment.

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