"Hybrid" carbon pricing : issues to consider when carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems interact (eBook, 2009) [WorldCat.org]
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"Hybrid" carbon pricing : issues to consider when carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems interact

Author: University of Ottawa. Sustainable Prosperity.
Publisher: Ottawa, Ont. : Sustainable Prosperity (University of Ottawa), ©2009
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Two differennt types of carbon pricing are emerging in Canada: carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems. In a few jurisdictions, those systems are poised to interact. The consequences of such a "hybrid" approach have not been closely considered. This report seeks to anticipate some of those issues and to consider how problems might be avoided.
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: University of Ottawa. Sustainable Prosperity.
OCLC Number: 427513804
Description: 1 online resource (13 pages : table, graph
Contents: What issues arise when cap-and-trade systems and carbon taxes interact? --
Issue 1: price interaction --
Issue 2: revenue recycling and adverse impacts --
Issue 3: international alignment --
Alignment through equivalent prices --
Alignment through equivalent reductions --
Alignment through intensity-based caps --
Alignment of specific industry targets across jurisdictions --
Mass market emitters, offsets and cap and international alignment --
Conclusion --
Notes --
About the author.
Responsibility: [Sustainable Prosperity].
More information:

Abstract:

Two differennt types of carbon pricing are emerging in Canada: carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems. In a few jurisdictions, those systems are poised to interact. The consequences of such a "hybrid" approach have not been closely considered. This report seeks to anticipate some of those issues and to consider how problems might be avoided.

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